Saturday, June 28, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Thursday evening, 3 July 2014: Dr. Paul Hsieh on "Understanding the Three Languages of Politics"

I'll interview physician and activist Dr. Paul Hsieh about "Understanding the Three Languages of Politics" on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 3 July 2014.

How many times have you been in political discussions with friends where you find you're talking past one another? You'll make points they consider irrelevant, whereas they'll focus on issues you consider nonessential. Such problems can be overcome, at least in part, using Arnold Kling's concept of the "Three Languages of Politics." Paul Hsieh will explain how freedom advocates (e.g., Objectivists and better libertarians), conservatives, and liberals tend to use three vastly different metaphors in political discussions, which can create unintentional misunderstandings and miscommunications. He will also discuss how to frame discussion points so they better resonate with those speaking the other "languages" without compromising on principles.

Dr. Paul Hsieh is a physician in practice in South Denver. He is the co-founder of Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine (FIRM). He has written scores of op-eds, mostly on health care policy, as well as articles for The Objective Standard. He blogs offbeat tech news at GeekPress.

The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 3 July 2014. The podcast will be posted later that evening. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

22 June 2014: Q&A on Egoism, Drunk Driving, Curbing Dogs, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Does egoism suffer from 'one thought too many'? Should driving drunk be illegal in a free society? Do dog owners violate rights by allowing their dogs to poop on others' lawns?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

26 June 2014: Q&A on Rapid Fire Extravaganza

I answered 20 questions from the Rapid Fire Queue on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio.

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including the full list of questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, June 27, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #219

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Eileen Laird presents Easy Shrimp Ceviche posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "I have a great recipe for you today: (1) It's cool and refreshing on a hot summer day. (2) It's quick to prepare. (3) It's nutrient dense and helps balance your omega 3:6 ratio in the right direction. (4) And it's made with sustainable ingredients. Enjoy!"

Kris Gunnars presents 20 Mainstream Nutrition Myths (Debunked by Science) posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Mainstream nutrition is full of all sorts of nonsense. Here are 20 nutrition myths that have been debunked by science and plain common sense."

Kevin Geary presents The Dark Side of Birth Control posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Take a listen to find out about the dark side of birth control with podcast guest Michael McEvoy."

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #144: Butter, exercise and AIP, MCT oil/Bulletproof coffee, sweet drinks on the 21DSD, and skin help posted at Balanced Bites , saying, "Butter, exercise and AIP, MCT oil/Bulletproof coffee, sweet drinks on the 21DSD, and skin help!"

Sabine presents Eggplant Lasagna posted at CaveFood Kitchen, saying, "Going Paleo doesn't mean you'd have to go without this Italian Classic!"

Kris Gunnars presents 6 Proven Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar (No. 3 is Best) posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Apple cider vinegar is incredibly popular in the natural health community. Here are 6 proven ways that it can benefit your health."

Ruth presents To Sea Salt or not to Sea Salt? posted at Paleo Diet Basics, saying, "Have you switched to sea salt? Should you? Does it really make a difference?"

Kevin Geary presents The #1 Obstacle to Success You Face Every Single Day posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Understanding evolutionary mismatch is one of the keys to shifting perspective. Read on to find out about the top three evolutionary mismatches!"

Carmen Eat Joy presents Amazingly Bakeable Chocolate Chips posted at Carmen Eat Joy, saying, "So a HUGE amount of paleo recipes use Enjoy Life choc chips in them. They are not easy to get down in Australia unless we order them online, and plus I would really prefer just to make them myself. So much nicer and then you know exactly what went into them!"

Meghanne Reburn presents Bulletproof Coffee and Pregnancy posted at CaveGirl Plus One, saying, "This week Meg, the Paleo Midwife responds to a reader question and explores the risks and benefits of Bulletproof coffee drinking during pregnancy. Grab a mug and enjoy this weeks post."

Eileen Laird presents 50 Paleo AIP Condiments posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "Condiments are a great way to add some quick and varied flavor to your meals, and when you're following the paleo autoimmune protocol (AIP), that can be a little tricky. The vast majority of condiments contain ingredients not allowed on the AIP. So, what to do? No worries...I've got you covered with a great list of AIP-friendly recipes."

Amy Kubal presents Robb Wolf Podcast with Amy Kubal posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "We laughed, we cried, we recorded a podcast. Enjoy!"

Nell Stephenson presents Super Food, Or Just Food? posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo Expert Nell Stephenson writes about how so many things in today's diet are not actually food and why we don't need 'super food'."

Paul Jaminet presents Seth Roberts: An Appreciation posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "My tribute to Seth Roberts, a true scientist."

Jennifer Brand aka Alliefitfoodie presents Chocolate, I heart you posted at Alliefitfoodie, saying, "I love chocolate. And it can be good for you! I realize this isn't huge news to those of us in the loop, but this is my own take/one aspect of it I researched."

Salixisme presents Beef Jerky - Paleo/AIP posted at Salixisme - Paleo Living, saying, "This beef jerky is AIP-Paleo, and contains no nightshade spices. Despite this, it still tastes AMAZING!"

Salixisme presents Turmeric Coconut Cod with Mushrooms posted at Salixisme - Paleo Living, saying, "The turmeric gives the fish a beautiful yellow colour and a subtle flavour while the coconut milk makes a creamy sauce."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Monday, June 23, 2014

The Vibram Settlement

By Tom G Varik

Cross-posted from WoPSR.net.

If you’ve been in the paleo community for a while, you’re probably seen a pair of Vibram FiveFingers toe shoes. You may even own a pair, or, like me, eight. And you may have also have heard that Vibram have settled a class action suit for $3.75m. There are quite a few nasty, mean-spirited articles out there on the Internet shouting “I told you so,” claiming this settlement proves barefoot running and minimalist shoes were stupid ideas all along, and laughing at those of us who are and continue to be quite happy with our purchases. I won’t link to them here. You can find them on your own if you want.

If you bought a pair of FiveFingers after March 2009, you’re part of the class, and you may already have received notice. You can check the settlement website to see the eligibility criteria and file a claim.

But before you do, here are a few things you should know.

Read more...

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 22 June 2014: Q&A on Egoism, Drunk Driving, Curbing Dogs, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 22 June 2014.
  • Question 1: Egoism and One Thought Too Many: Does egoism suffer from "one thought too many"? Bernard Williams argues that utilitarianism suffers from a problem of inappropriate motivation in which a person has "one thought too many" before acting morally. So, for example, a good utilitarian must calculate whether the general welfare is served by saving a drowning child before jumping into the water. A truly good person, in contrast, simply jumps into the water to save the child without that calculation. Wouldn't this same objection apply to even rational, benevolent egoism? Or are those extra thoughts between situation and action actually rational?
  • Question 2: Drunk Driving: Should driving drunk be illegal in a free society? Should the government of a free society forbid and punish people for activities potentially harmful to others when they've impaired their judgment via drugs or alcohol? Basically, should driving or shooting a firearm while drunk be illegal? Or should such decisions be left entirely to the discretion of private property owners? Also, given that the government owns the roads today, are laws against drunk driving unjust?
  • Question 3: Dogs Versus Private Property: Do dog owners violate rights by allowing their dogs to poop on others' lawns? I live in a residential urban area along with many dog owners. On a daily basis, I observe those dog owners allowing their dogs to defecate on other peoples' lawns. I view this action as a trespass and violation of property rights, whether or not they pick up afterward. (For those who believe that picking up after your dog mitigates the trespass, would you let your child play on that spot afterward?) I don't believe that property owners should have to create fences, hedges, or other structures to prevent this trespass. On several occasions, I have asked owners not to let their dogs poop on the front lawn of our apartment. I have received various responses from polite acquiescence to incredulousness. Many dog owners seem to feel a sense of entitlement about using others' property without permission. Isn't that wrong? Would you agree that it is the sole responsibility of the animal owners to care for their pets without violating the rights of the people around them? What, if any, recourse would property owners have in a free society against blatant repeat offenders of this principle?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 22 June 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.

Thursday morning, 26 June 2014: Q&A on Psychological Egoism, Atlas Shrugged, Enjoying the Moment, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday morning, 26 June 2014.
  • Question 1: Psychological Egoism: Isn't everyone selfish? If you dig deep enough, everyone seems to be selfish. I work because that's easier than being a welfare queen. But a college student might cave to his parents about his choice of career because that's easier than standing up for himself. Even the nun who seems to sacrifice everything is doing what she enjoys most and thinks best by her own religious standards. So isn't true altruism impossible? Isn't everyone selfish?
  • Question 2: The Purpose of Atlas Shrugged: Was Atlas Shrugged written to save America? Recently, I ran across this comment on the internet: ""Saving America wasn't the point of Atlas Shrugged, that's not the happily ever after it proposes in the end. It chronicles the main characters getting over that misguided mission and why." Two questions come to mind: (1) What was Ayn Rand's purpose in writing Atlas Shrugged? And (2) Do you think that being inspired to "save America" after reading "Atlas Shrugged" is misguided?
  • Question 3: The Limits of Generosity: How much generosity is too much? Generosity seems like a trait that would fit well into your theory of moral amplifiers. But how does one best deal with someone who is being overly generous? I recently relocated to a new city and one of my coworkers with whom I am friendly has really gone above and beyond trying to help me get settled. She is constantly offering to help, lend me things, or even give me things to make life easier. I appreciate her offers and turn down many of them as politely as I can. But I struggle to find the right balance of accepting her generosity in due proportion to our friendship. She seems to be fairly wealthy, so I don't think her offers are sacrificial in any way, my issue is that we are friends, but not close enough friends to justify the incessant barrage of motherly offerings. Through consistent communication about what I am willing to accept and what I won't – and also owing to actually getting settled in the new city – she's backed off a bit. More broadly, how would you recommend dealing with this sort of problem? How can a person make sure not to make this mistake of being overly generous?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Thursday, 26 June 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts

The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

15 June 2014: Q&A on Stand Your Ground Laws, New Objectivists, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Are 'stand your ground' self-defense laws proper? What advice would you give to a new Objectivist?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.
19 June 2014: Chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Three" I discussed "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Three" with listeners on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio: "What does Thomas Nagel's control condition for moral responsibility really mean? Does it set an impossible standard? Have others noticed and capitalized on this problem? I answered these questions and more in this discussion of Chapter Three of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame." You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more.

Recent Blog Posts

Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed. If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 15 June 2014: Q&A on Stand Your Ground Laws, New Objectivists, Curbing Dogs, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 15 June 2014.
  • Question 1: "Stand Your Ground" Laws: Are "stand your ground" self-defense laws proper? Should a potential crime victim in reasonable fear of of his life be required to attempt to withdraw from a confrontation when possible? Or is it proper to allow him to "stand his ground" and use a firearm to kill the assailant?
  • Question 2: Advice to New Objectivists: What advice would you give to a new Objectivist? At ATLOSCon, you led a discussion on "What I Wish I’d Known as a New Objectivist." Personally, I wish I could tell younger self that the term "selfish" doesn't mean the "screw everyone else, I'm getting mine" behavior that most people think it means. Other people will use the term that way, and trying to correct them is an uphill battle not worth fighting. I'd tell my younger self to just use a long-winded circumlocution to get the point across. What other kinds of obstacles do people new to Objectivism commonly encounter? What advice would you give to new Objectivists to help them recognize and overcome those obstacles?
  • Question 3: Dogs Versus Private Property: Do dog owners violate rights by allowing their dogs to poop on others' lawns? I live in a residential urban area along with many dog owners. On a daily basis, I observe those dog owners allowing their dogs to defecate on other peoples' lawns. I view this action as a trespass and violation of property rights, whether or not they pick up afterward. (For those who believe that picking up after your dog mitigates the trespass, would you let your child play on that spot afterward?) I don't believe that property owners should have to create fences, hedges, or other structures to prevent this trespass. On several occasions, I have asked owners not to let their dogs poop on the front lawn of our apartment. I have received various responses from polite acquiescence to incredulousness. Many dog owners seem to feel a sense of entitlement about using others' property without permission. Isn't that wrong? Would you agree that it is the sole responsibility of the animal owners to care for their pets without violating the rights of the people around them? What, if any, recourse would property owners have in a free society against blatant repeat offenders of this principle?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 15 June 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.

Thursday evening, 19 June 2014: Chat about "Discussion of Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Three"

I'll chat about "Discussion of Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Three" with listeners on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 19 June 2014.

What does Thomas Nagel's control condition for moral responsibility really mean? Does it set an impossible standard? Have others noticed and capitalized on this problem? I will answer these questions and more in this live discussion of Chapter Three of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame.

The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 19 June 2014. The podcast will be posted later that evening. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

8 June 2014: Q&A on Disabled Children, Muslim Immigrants, Cashier's Mistake, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

How can a disabled person overcome a toxic childhood? Does the lack of respect for rights among some Muslim immigrants justify banning all Muslim immigrants? Is it wrong to remain silent when a cashier makes a mistake in your favor?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, June 13, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #218

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Kris Gunnars presents 11 Proven Health Benefits of Chia Seeds posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Chia seeds are among the most nutritious foods on the planet. Here are 11 health benefits of chia seeds that are supported by science."

Kevin Geary presents Is Starbucks Healthy? posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Taking a closer look at different Starbucks products to determine if they meet our standard for healthy food and beverage choices."

Eileen Laird presents Eating Disorders and the AIP: A Conversation with Stefani Ruper posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "The paleo autoimmune protocol is a powerful tool for healing, but it's also a restrictive diet. Food is an emotional experience for us all, but if you struggle with eating disorders, that's even more true. I've gotten emails from readers asking how they can navigate the paleo autoimmune protocol (AIP) without triggering disordered eating behaviors of their past. I've also seen conversations in the AIP Facebook groups that hint at some people using the AIP as an excuse to eat less. I've personally experienced fear of food, once I learned how it can exacerbate my autoimmune disease. Today, I talk with Stefani Ruper, an expert on disordered eating, on how we can navigate the autoimmune protocol in a way that's healthy both physically and psychologically."

Jennifer Brand (aka Alliefitfoodie) presents Have no fear, fat and cholesterol are here! Really! posted at Alliefitfoodie, saying, "I’ve had some discussions with folks lately about fat and cholesterol. Yes, as a society we are still obsessed with these two very important components of nutrition and body cell composition. In this post I break it down as to why fat and cholesterol aren't the culprits in raising serum cholesterol levels (LDL)."

Meghanne Reburn RM presents I made donuts out of plantains...true story posted at CaveGirl Plus One, saying, "In a rare recipe post, this week, Meg, the Paleo Midwife got funky in the kitchen and made a handful of mini donuts out of simple ingredients. These little gems are great treats when your pregnant or if you are experiencing carb cravings in the first trimester. Hope you enjoy!"

Sabine presents Easy Fish Cakes posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "These fish cakes are easy to make and even the kids will love them!"

Diane Sanfilippo presents FAQs: What Are Safe Cooking Fats and Oils? posted at Balanced Bites , saying, "Curious about what cooking oils are safe to use when cooking? Check out this blog post about my favorite oils to use when cooking."

Meghan Little and Angel Ayala Torres presents Fast Paleo Guacamole, A Fast and Easy Appetizer posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Our Fast Paleo Guacamole is perfect for those days when you need to whip up something amazing quickly! Vegan and ready in under 5 minutes, who knew appetizers could be this easy and delicious?!"

Nell Stephenson presents Call for Action- Your Paleo Support is Needed posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson asks readers to put their money where their mouths are, step up and support the Paleo Menu at the Hyatt next Wednesday at the event she is hosting in conjunction with Paleo Chef Ali at Breeze of the Hyatt Regency in Century City."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, June 07, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 8 June 2014: Q&A on Disabled Children, Muslim Immigrants, Cashier's Mistake, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 8 June 2014.
  • Question 1: Parenting a Disabled Child: How can a disabled person overcome a toxic childhood? I am a fifty-one-year-old woman with several neurological disabilities, and I would have liked to have been reared as a human being. Instead, I was frequently informed (usually by my mother) that I was a "retarded, subhuman spectacle" – a "vegetable," a "handicapped monstrosity," a "travesty of a human being." It was daily made plain to me that I was being reared purely out of my parents' sense of duty, so as not to burden other people with my existence. It was likewise continually made clear to me that, whenever anyone played with me or tried to become acquainted with me, they did this purely out of an imposed sense of a duty to do so: for instance, because they were following a parent's or teacher's commands in order to avoid being punished for avoiding me. My disabilities (dyspraxia, dysgraphia, and severe Asperger's among some others) are not physically visible. However, their effects on my behavior led to my being perceived as retarded despite a tested IQ above 150. (This tested overall IQ, in turn, was although scores on three of the subtests were in the 80-90 range.) By that standard, at least – the objective standard of lacking some reasoning power – I am a handicapped human being. As you know, Ayn Rand points out that no child ought to be exposed to "the tragic spectacle of a handicapped human being." How should this principle have been carried out with regard to me, as a child? Further, the consequences for me of growing up in this way include an immense fear of other people, and a feeling (which I have been unable to change or vanquish) that I am indeed subhuman and should be rejected by anyone I admire, anyone worth dealing with. This feeling persists despite what I rationally consider to be productive adult achievement in the personal and professional realms. So how can I best undo the damage that has been done to my sense of life by my situation itself (being a handicapped human being, and recognizing this) and by how I was reared (which was at least partly a consequence of what I was and am)?
  • Question 2: Muslim Immigrants: Does the lack of respect for rights among some Muslims immigrants justify banning all Muslim immigrants? Sometimes, I hear people say that immigrants from Muslim countries are so illiberal (in the classical sense) that they ought to banned from entering the United States and Western Europe. The anti-immigrationists say that when people from Muslim countries are allowed to reside in the West, such immigrants remain committed to political Islam, honor-kill their own daughters, rape native-born women, and plot to impose sharia law on the West through "stealth jihad." Is the illiberalism of some (or even many) Muslim immigrants grounds for limiting immigration from Muslim countries? What is the proper response to this problem?
  • Question 3: Correcting a Cashier's Mistake: Is it wrong to remain silent when a cashier makes a mistake in your favor? At a popular department store, I wanted to buy two items for $2.94 each and condoms for $14.00. The cashier was about my grandmother's age. She scanned the $2.94 items three times and said the total was $8.82. I knew the price wasn't right, , but I didn't want to say to the elderly woman, "Excuse me, but you didn't scan my condoms." I got a good deal, but I think that was somewhat immoral on my part. Is that right? What should I have done?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 8 June 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

5 June 2014: Chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Two"

I discussed "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Two" with listeners on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

"What are some of the common proposed solutions to the problem of moral luck? How and why do they fail? I will answer these questions and more in this live discussion of Chapter Two of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame."

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, June 06, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #217

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Ruth presents Problem Solved! Finally a Paleo-Friendly Binder for Meatballs, Meatloaf and Vegetable Patties posted at Paleo Diet Basics, saying, "So you stopped eating grains and you feel better for it, but what can you use in place of flour when making meatloaf, meatballs, hamburgers, or vegetable patties, like these carrot patties or yummy leek patties?"

Ruth presents Paleo Nectarine and Berry Delight posted at Paleo Diet Basics, saying, "Looking for a great summery dessert? The combination of nectarines and mixed berries sautéing in butter makes this a winner!"

Jenn Casey presents 10 Reasons I Might Not Be Eating Paleo posted at Rational Jenn, saying, "I am very committed to eating well, and I do well at eating well! But my commitment to myself is NOT to eat 100% paleo 100% of the time. If you see me eating something off-paleo, here are some reasons why that might be."

Kris Gunnars presents 4 Superfoods That Are Not Paleo posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "It makes no sense to avoid a healthy food just because it isn't paleo. Here are 4 super healthy foods that are not allowed on a strict paleo diet."

Amy Kubal presents What Are You Afraid Of? posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Sugar, gluten, dairy... They're out to get you - or are they??"

Eileen Laird presents Steak Salad with Arugula posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "I used to be someone how could never cook a steak correctly. It would either be overdone or underdone, and when it was an expensive cut, it was very frustrating! Enter the sear and bake method, which is almost foolproof. Throw a perfectly cooked steak on top of a bed of arugula and you have one of my favorite easy meals."

Kevin Geary presents How to Deal with the Challenges of Friends and Family posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Wondering how to deal with friends and family who try to undermine your efforts to be healthier? Check out this audio blogpost for helpful insights on dealing with those who try to sabotage your health efforts!"

Sabine presents Grilled Beef Tagliata posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "A classic Italian dish, always a success!"

Sabine presents Easy Taco Shells posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "Miss Mexican tac's? This might help a little ;-)."

Sabine presents Simple coconut yoghurt posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "Most recipes for home-made yoghurt still call for dairy cultures, but this recipe is guaranteed 100% dairy-free!"

Meghanne Reburn presents Is a Paleo Diet Safe During Pregnancy posted at CaveGirl Plus One, saying, "In this weeks post, Meg, the Paleo Midwife, answers her most frequent question from blog readers. Is a Paleo Diet Safe in Pregnancy?"

Diane Sanfilippo presents Supporting Your 21DSD: 21-Tips for Not-Sweet Sips posted at Balanced Bites , saying, "Looking for ways to spruce up what you drink each day? Here are 21 tips to help. Great for people also doing the 21 Day Sugar Detox!"

Nell Stephenson presents You’re Invited to An Evening of Paleo Haute Cuisine in Los Angeles posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson invites readers to her Paleo Haute Cuisine Event held in conjuction with Hyatt Regency's Paleo Chef Ali of Breeze Restaurant and her Paleo in LA Meet Up Group."

Steve Kirsch presents ApoE, cholesterol and alcohol revisited. An N=1 experiment appears to pay off. posted at The Paleo Drummer, saying, "I quit drinking alcohol for six months, thinking I was being 'healthy," but, when I did, all the "bad" measures of LDL (particle number and small-dense) skyrocketed. When I resumed moderate drinking, they plunged. Because genetics."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Monday, June 02, 2014

10 Reasons I Might Not Be Eating Paleo

By Jenn Casey

Reposted from my blog, Rational Jenn.

As lots of you know, I've been eating paleo/primal/real food for many years now, to the overall benefit of my health, and I am committed to continuing this good eating plan forever and ever.

But, that doesn't mean I eat 100% paleo 100% of the time! If you see me consuming something that is definitely not paleo, here are some reasons why that might be:


1. I'm traveling.

I find it difficult to eat 100% paleo when traveling, for various reasons. So I make travel-related compromises. I will sometimes eat fast food like french fries (made in god-knows-what-kind-of-oil). Generally though, I opt for a salad of some kind, but will usually forget to ask them to leave the cheese off. I won't use unknown salad dressings, so I often end up eating fast food chicken and dry lettuce. Meh. I usually have good snacks with me, too, of course, but sometimes it gets boring eating out of a cooler or only nuts and beef jerky, etc.

For me, travel is stressful enough (I've got kids, duh) so I choose not to add food stress on top of travel stress. 


2. I am eating for joy, usually when I'm on a vacation, at a special event, or at ATLOSCon.

My sister-in-law is about to get married, and you betcha I'm going to eat some wedding cake! (Gosh, I hope they have wedding cake!) When I go to the beach, I love to try crab cakes and other local seafood (fried up in god-knows-what-and-I-don't-care-kind-of-oil). I drink wine, sometimes a LOT of wine (ahem, ATLOSCon).

Sometimes, eating is about taste and texture and celebrating.


3. I am doing a food experiment relating to my physical health.

Lately, I've been experimenting with my calorie intake and macro ratios because I'm in training for a kettlebell competition. I have been trying to consume more calories than I had been, and specifically, I have added in extra carbs post-workout. In addition to sweet potato (my favorite), I've been trying out how rice affects how I feel and/or my training. Oh noes! A grain!!!! I know, think of the children, right? It's actually been working out very well.

The VAST majority of the time, my eating decisions follow from this purpose: feel good and recover well while training hard.


4. I am doing a food experiment relating to my mental health.

Since my food issues have a mental health component due to bad eating habits in the past, I sometimes choose to eat something just to see how my brain handles it. So, at a family event back in the spring, I ate some cupcakes. Like a lot of cupcakes. Then I learned something—I have no self-control when it comes to cupcakes. I have also learned this lesson with candy corn. See? Now I know!

Knowing the kinds of foods that trigger binge eating makes it a million times easier for me to simply avoid going there in the first place. 


5. I am making a conscious compromise on food products/quality due to budgetary reasons.

I would love to serve my family grassfed beef and free range eggs and fresh produce directly from a garden, or at least Whole Foods, every single day.

I have five people to feed, and a finite budget. Sometimes regular grocery store eggs must suffice. Sadly, a personal chef is also currently out of the budget.


6. I am making a conscious compromise on food products/quality due to reasons of convenience.

I would love to serve my family grassfed beef and free range eggs and fresh produce directly from a garden or at least Whole Foods, every single day.

I have five people to feed, a crazybusy schedule, and a distinct lack of gardens filled with fresh produce in my immediate vicinity (same problem with WF). Sometimes, produce from the regular grocery store must suffice. Sadly, a volunteer personal chef is also MIA.


7. I am super hungry due to training (and probably miscalculation of my calories/macros) and need to eat something—anything—NOW, because lives might be in danger.

Referring back to #3—sometimes I miscalculate how much I've eaten/need to eat and I'm really freaking hungry. So I will eat the paleo equivalent of a candy bar (a Larabar). Or coconut milk ice cream. Or even actual ice cream.

Interestingly, though this happens about once a week (I'm still new at this), I haven't noticed any major detrimental effects. And the body count remains at 0, so that's a win.


8. I want to eat cheesecake. Or pizza. Or drink a beer.

When we moved into Wildhaven (our home) two years ago, we ate our first family dinner on the back porch. It was pizza and beer, which, if I'm correct, is the traditional Moving Day meal all across the world. At that point in time, it had probably been six months since I'd had pizza and even longer since I'd had a beer. It was glorious. Okay, yeah, maybe that was a special occasion (or a combination of special occasion and eating for convenience). But here's the thing—sometimes I eat something just 'cause I'm a grownup and I wanna. But I generally take the time to make this decision with my eyes wide open.

Every once in a while, I consciously, deliberately, and delightedly indulge in a mood and eat for joy. No special occasion needed. 


9. One of my kids is sick and I haven't been to the grocery store in a while.

A logistical fail that happens from time to time: one of the kids is indisposed such that I am unable to leave the house. This is inevitably timed for the day I was planning to head to the grocery store. Therefore, I am left with the choice between eating nothing or eating chips and salsa or leftover pizza or something.

John Lennon once sang, "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." Yup.


10. I am eating carelessly and mindlessly.

By far, the least likely reason I might be eating non-paleo food. BY FAR. I have worked hard to overcome bad habits such as stress eating, and if I fall back into such a pattern, I'm home alone or with my family. Really, it's not such an issue any more (knock wood).

It is always best to assume that I know exactly what I'm doing and why in any given food-related moment. 


I hate to feel defensive about what I'm eating, particularly as a non-low-body-fat-American. Happily, it doesn't faze me much any more if I get looks from others. But I've been thinking about this off and on for a while, and see, now I've got a blog post to point people to in the future! :)

Thoughts on this? I can't be the only one out there.

Also, stay tuned for my related post: "X Reasons My Kids Might Not Be Eating Paleo" (the X is because I don't know how many reasons I'll think up just yet)!


Jenn is a homeschooling mom of three, CrossFit Kids coach, kettlebell sport lifter, and all-around awesome person from Kennesaw, Georgia. 

Read more...

Back to TOP