Tuesday, July 31, 2012

halloumi, cucumber, watermelon, and fennel seed salad

By Julie


I'm done! I'm done I'm done I'm done! No more 60 hours/week at my desk job plus the many other hours I put into Gathered! That really took it out of me. I felt like I was back in school, what with all of the 5 hour/night sleeps. Bleh, I do NOT do well with that. Some people seem to. I suppose there's a bit of variation among people, but I'm betting that they are just used to subsisting on a general level of Suck. So when level Suck is elevated to Suck Less after they get 6 hours of sleep, they think "hm, this is nice". Whereas me, I'm at level Awesome for most days and level Suck Less feels like level Total and Complete Shit.
Despite being a mega crab, I still made this lovely salad. Just for you. And me, because I ate lots. And because I needed another excuse to put more watermelon into my life. It's not even good this time of year. Not stopping me. One day, possibly this summer, I will make it my goal to eat an entire watermelon. The only hindrance to completing that goal is self respect. Bah. Halloumi , as I've mentioned before is wonderful. So, so wonderful. In general, I'm rather cheese indifferent. I don't not like it, but like, cubes of cheese on a cheese tray don't do much for me. I'll eat all of the grapes in the middle, but yeah. Browned cheese, on the other hand. OH HELLO. It's the best. Then, if the cheese happens to be deliciously salty, then HELLO AGAIN! I LOVE YOU! A deliciously salty, browned, sheep's milk cheese? YES PLEASE!
I switched gyms. I didn't want to switch, I just couldn't hack the long drive anymore. Initially I lived closer to the gym's original location, but then I moved east and then they moved west, and then my new job isn't convenient to it at all. And I just hate driving so much; I want to bike. So, bleh. It felt like moving to a new school, or how I imagine moving to a new school would have felt like back in grade school. Sad. So now I go to mega gym. It's real fancy. And one of the owners just won the Southwest CrossFit Regionals (the other came in 6th). So, we'll see. So far I really miss my old gym and all my friends. This one's much more serious. I'm not sure they appreciate my hilarity and antics. Then again, perhaps I'll benefit from some strictness.
Although I really like the simplicity of this salad, you could get creative. Sub cumin seeds for the fennel seeds, mint for the tarragon, use blackberries for the watermelon, add tomatoes, red onions, etc. Definitely try it as is, because it's really awesome, but just sayin'. The halloumi is worth it. I mean, I guess you could do feta. And not pan fry it. And make me cry. That's fine. The proportions of each ingredient are kind of up to you. I like more watermelon and cucumber to cheese, but Joe would have preferred a salad composed of nearly entirely cheese. Fancy that.
halloumi, watermelon, and cucumber salad
adapted from Ripe, by Cheryl Sternman Rule

2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, pressed or minced
2 teaspoons fennel seeds
8 ounces halloumi, sliced lengthwise into 1/3 inch slices
2 cucumbers
1/4 - 1/2 watermelon, cut into 3/4 inch cubes
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh tarragon

1. Whisk the vinegar, oil, and garlic together in a medium serving bowl. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

2. In a small, dry skillet, toast the fennel seeds over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes, shaking around a bit, until fragrant. Put into the dressing bowl.

3. With the same skillet, heat to medium high. Add the halloumi and brown for about two minutes per side. Set aside.

4. Cut the cucumbers in half lengthwise. Using a small spoon, scrape the seeds out. The slice them widthwise into 1/2 inch thick slices and add to the serving bowl.

5. Add the watermelon cubes and tarragon to the serving bowl. Tear the cheese into pieces, add to the bowl, and toss everything to coat.

Adjust any seasonings to taste and serve! Or eat right out of the bowl...
This was originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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Saturday, July 28, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Philosophy in Action Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday morning's episode of Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio, I'll answer questions on the morality of cloning, hypocritical allies, standards of beauty, capitalism and serving others, and more with Greg Perkins.

  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 29 July 2012, 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: Philosophy in Action's Live Studio

This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: The Morality of Cloning: If cloning humans were possible, would it be wrong? Most people think that cloning humans, if possible, would be terribly immoral and creepy. What are their arguments? Are those arguments right or wrong? Also, would cloning a person without his or her consent be some kind of rights violation?


  • Question 2: Hypocritical Allies: What should you do when your allies are exposed as hypocrites? Just because a person advocates good ideas doesn't mean that he practices them. For example, a defender of free markets might use zoning laws to prevent the construction of a new building on land adjacent to his home, an advocate of justice and independence as virtues might condemn and ostracize people who disagree with him on trivial matters, and an advocate of productive work might sponge off friends and relatives. When you discover such behavior in your allies, what should you do? Should you attempt to defend them? Should you try to keep the hypocrisy quiet? Should you condemn them? Should you say that "nobody's perfect"? What's fair – and what's best for your cause?


  • Question 3: Standards of Beauty: Isn't beauty in the eye of the beholder? In your November 13th, 2011 webcast discussion of aesthetic body modification, you rejected the idea that beauty is just a matter of personal taste or cultural norms. What's your view – and why?


  • Question 4: Capitalism and Altruism: Is capitalism altruistic? Some people attempt to defend capitalism and free markets on altruistic grounds. Under capitalism, they say, a successful businesses must serve the needs of its customers. Hence, capitalism promotes altruism. Is that true? Is it an effective way to defend capitalism?
After that, we'll tackle some impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

To join the live broadcast and its chat, just point your browser to Philosophy in Action's Live Studio a few minutes before the show is scheduled to start. If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat.

If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio from the episode posted here: Q&A Radio: 29 July 2012.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts every Sunday morning and Wednesday evening. For information on upcoming shows and more, visit the Episodes on Tap.

I hope that you join us on Sunday morning!

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Friday, July 27, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #121

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Adam Farrah presents Surviving in Our Age of Digital Distraction posted at Practical Paleolithic, saying, "A blog post that explores the topic of healthy, Paleo living in an always-on, digital, distraction-filled world..."

Ute presents Nom nom! Paleo Pancakes posted at Grokette's Primal Musings, saying, "I'm posting a delicious coconut pancake recipe from FastPaleo, that I tweaked just a bit."

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Paleo Asparagus, Mushroom & Pork Stirfry, A Quick Meal Idea posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Everyone has those days when they just don't want to cook. This recipe makes it easy - just cut up the ingredients and throw everything into a skillet...Done! Paleo Cooking has never been so easy or satisfying!"

Brittney Beckham presents Virality = GIVEAWAY posted at CrossFit + Paleo = A Winning Combination, saying, "Directions for a GIVEAWAY of Practical Paleo ( a brand-new Paleo informational cookbook that will be coming out soon!!!)."

Nell Stephenson presents Gluten is A Very Bad Idea for All of Us posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "A review of the toxicity of gluten for everyone!"

Blair presents A Toast To Tej posted at The Found Link, saying, "Tej, the ancient Ethiopian intoxicant, is a honey of a wine. The process of production is basic fermentation and the crucial additive is a quantity of stems from a specific African shrub."

Riki Shore presents Souvlaki Lamb Burgers posted at Three Squares, saying, "Lemony and garlicky lamb burgers won't disappoint at a summer BBQ or as an easy weeknight meal."

Fatisfied presents Dogs in a Pig's Blanket posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "With the laziness of Summer days, what a relief it is to remember this quick fix fare."

Miki Ben-Dor presents The obesogenic effect of non-evolutionary "strange' foods posted at Paleostyle, saying, "Spreadbury's interesting recent hypothesis regarding acellular starch has incited me to Improve my evolutionary based hypothesis as to why the world is getting obese"

Rafael B., PhD presents ¿Que comían nuestros antepasados? posted at Coma Mejor (eat better), saying, "In spanish, COmbine your Paleo life with spanish!!!! What do uor ancestors ate? (que comian nuestros antepasados)"

Kris presents Why Are Seed And Vegetable Oils Bad For You? The Shocking Truth posted at Kris Kris, saying, "Why are seed and vegetable oils bad for you? The shocking truth about these "foods" and how they lead to disease by overloading us with Omega-6 fats."

Susie T. Gibbs presents Nekkid Potstickers - Paleo Comfort Food posted at Fluffy Chix Cook, saying, "Avoid the pitfalls of soy, sugar, and high glycemic carbs lurking in Asian foods prepared in restaurants by making this easy dish at home. Eat Nekkid Potstickers on their own or in served in a lettuce cup and you'll never miss that high carbage wrapper."

Megh presents Botulism-Free Garlic Oil posted at Yolks, Kefir, & Gristle, saying, "How to have your garlic and enjoy it to with FODMAPs sensitivity."

Peggy Emch presents The Primal Parent Maternity Photos posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "What does a Pregnant Primal mama look like? Check out my maternity photos!"

Christian presents The Stress That is Killing You posted at The VitalObjectives Blog, saying, "I have created a PDF poster which explains the connection between chronic stress (life stress, as well as "hidden" stress factors, such as food sensitivity) and virtually any kind of health problem."

Penny McIntosh presents In Search of REAL Food posted at Health Coach Penny, saying, "Watch this short video of my attempt to find REAL food in my neck of the woods."

Amy Kubal presents What The "Paleo" World Eats: Paleo In Pictures posted at Robb Wolf, saying, ""Check out what real Paleo eaters buy at the grocery store each week. It's paleo in pictures!"

Shantel presents Making Kombucha Pt.1 posted at Urban Cave Girl, saying, "Making some home brewed kombucha."

Max Ungar presents Top 10 Primal Dorm Room Must Haves posted at Caveman College, saying, "A great packing list for primal college kids!"

Jedha presents 7 Simple Paleo Diet Tips posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach, saying, "A few simple tips that people commonly stumble on. Usually it's the simple things that can bring more success."

Amy Marrero presents Why Organic and Grass-Fed Really Matter posted at Paleosophy, saying, "A high level overview of the nutritional differences between organic and grass-fed food versus conventionally farmed; and why it's worth the extra money for your overall well-being."

Victoria presents Liver and Lipids posted at Principle Into Practice, saying, "Research exploring fatty liver disease has gone on for decades, yet the information gleaned about the effects of different fats on disease progression seems all but forgotten. Which lipids do livers thrive on, and which make livers sick?"

Patty Strilaeff presents Roasted White Tomato and Tomatillo Salsa posted at following my nose, saying, "An attempt to keep tomatillos from taking over my kitchen."

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents What is Stevia and Why You Need to Know posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "What is Stevia? We provide you with a wealth of accurate Stevia information and guidelines. Read this article now to learn more."

Todd Dosenberry presents Chocolate Covered Bacon posted at Primal Toad, saying, "Chocolate + Bacon = Love. It's a sexy combo that is nearly impossible to resist. Have you tried it yet?"

Tony Federico presents How to Make Offal Awesome posted at Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Offal (organ meats) have gotten a bad rap, but that trend is reversing. A whole new generation (who was possibly spared bad early experiences) is rediscovering the joys of offal cooking! Plus, a recipe for Liver & Onions & Bacon (oh my!)"

Douglas Robb presents Just Say NO to Bread Back posted at Health Habits, saying, "Bread Back is defined as 'the loaf of back fat between a woman's bra and her underwear' (ref: 30 Rock) - Wanna guess how to defeat the dreaded Bread Back???"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Thursday, July 26, 2012

Beware "Gluten Free" Labels

By Diana Hsieh

Recently, I ran across this article from Experience Life: Be Cautious of Gluten-Free Labels:

Think you can have your gluten-free cake and eat it, too? Not so fast. Despite the hundreds of products that sport gluten-free labels, the FDA has no official standards to regulate the claim. For those striving to limit their gluten intake, that lack of regulation can be frustrating. But for those with celiac disease, hypersensitivities to cereal grains, or certain autoimmune diseases like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (in which the body mistakenly attacks the thyroid), a “gluten-free” food with traces of gluten can pose a serious health threat. Fortunately, new rules likely to be unveiled later this year should clear up the confusion.

As it stands now, the FDA only requires companies to state whether common allergens, such as wheat or nuts, are ingredients in a product. Labeling regulations are lax for products potentially cross-contaminated with allergens during the manufacturing process — something that happens frequently in facilities that process a wide variety of foods. That means small quantities of gluten can easily sneak into products labeled “gluten-free.”
The article holds out the hope in the form of FDA regulations, but I don't think that's the answer for people with Celiac or severe intolerances. Labels may not be accurate, often due to cross-contamination. A 2010 study found that many "inherently non-gluten grains" contained significant amounts of gluten:
Twenty-two inherently gluten-free grains, seeds, and flours not labeled gluten-free were purchased in June 2009 and sent unopened to a company who specializes in gluten analysis. All samples were homogenized and tested in duplicate using the Ridascreen Gliadin sandwich R5 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with cocktail extraction. Thirteen of 22 (59%) samples contained less than the limit of quantification of 5 parts per million (ppm) for gluten. Nine of 22 (41%) samples contained more than the limit of quantification, with mean gluten levels ranging from 8.5 to 2,925.0 ppm. Seven of 22 samples (32%) contained mean gluten levels >/=20 ppm and would not be considered gluten-free under the proposed FDA rule for gluten-free labeling. Gluten contamination of inherently gluten-free grains, seeds, and flours not labeled gluten-free is a legitimate concern.
For people with severe reactions to gluten, the solution should include avoiding all grains, I think. As the Experience Life article says at the end:
In the meantime, you can eliminate the guesswork by avoiding processed foods whenever possible. “The best way to avoid gluten is to eat products that aren’t manufactured,” says Korn. “Most natural, non-grain whole foods, such as vegetables, fruits, meats, legumes and fish, are inherently gluten-free.”
Gluten is everywhere, particularly when eating out... and those "gluten-free" cookies and cupcakes are just increasing the risk of accidental exposure.

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Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Death of a Crock Pot

By Earl3d

It feels like the end of an era.


My trusty old Crock Pot has finally bit the dust.  I don't know exactly what happened, but this morning while putting it away I noticed a hairline crack extending clear across the bottom of the heavy ceramic bowl and up the side.  The crack may have been there for some time, and might even be perfectly harmless, but I'm not particularly inclined to continue using it in its present state.  

It had been on a bit of a slow decline for a while now.  A couple of years ago I made the mistake of putting the lid in the dishwasher, causing the knob to warp. Then the screw that held the (still somewhat functional) warped knob in place, removed for cleaning, went into the garbage disposal, thus dispensing with any further use of the knob. This was provided an unexpected improvement in the form of a steam vent, via the now permanently exposed hole in the lid. I used it this way for a while, until I dropped and shattered the glass lid, sometime earlier this year.  

After that I was using a salad-sized plate for a lid, but now, finally, it's time for a whole new unit.

The Crock Pot was a gift from my mom in the early 2000's. I used it only occasionally before going paleo. After that transition, it became an indispensable part of my kitchen arsenal, and throughout 2011 it got its heaviest workout ever.  At the beginning of that year, I used it to make lots of tendon stew and bone broths while I was recovering from surgery on a tendon in my left hand. Later that fall, it ran nearly constantly, stewing up pig feet, which were the only thing I could get my dear old hound Todd to eat in his final stages of terminal cancer. I nearly threw it out after that, but in time the unpleasant associations with that episode faded to where I could make use of it once again, without being upset by it.

And so now, having properly eulogized my cherished slow cooker, it goes off to the rubbish bin, to be returned to the earth whence its raw materials originated. I will toss it into the black bin with a salute of "Thank Capitalism" in my heart.

I've decided to upgrade with my next slow cooker purchase. The old one was a basic round 4-quart model; I think I will replace it with a 6-quart oval one. I was a bit surprised by all the choices available on Amazon, and after a bit of looking it has come down to a choice between these:
Rival Crock Pot, 6-qt. with locking lid, $37.99 on Amazon.com

Hamilton Beach, 6-qt. with locking lid, programmable timer,
and temperature probe, $49.99 on Amazon.com


Cuisinart, 6.5-qt. fancy rectangular slow cooker, $99.95 on Amazon.com

I suspect I'll end up with the Hamilton Beach, even though it seems like a betrayal to not stick with the Rival Crock Pot brand. I like that it's programmable, with start time and stop time; it has a warming mode to keep your dinner hot without overcooking it; and I really like the temperature probe for roasts and such.  All that for fifty bucks seems like a pretty good deal, and Rival doesn't have one with the temperature probe at all, that I can find. The Cuisinart looks great (a very important consideration in my household), but has almost half as many 1-star reviews on Amazon as it has 5-star reviews, and that's a terrible ratio.

Thankfully, I had just finished a big batch of carnitas when the crack was discovered. I should be up and running with the new 'Pot by next week. As sad as I am to see the old Crock Pot go, I recently discovered nirvana in the form of braised lamb shanks (at the Elephant Bar in Burbank), and can't wait to get my hands on my new, bigger, programmable, temperature-probing slow cooker and give them a try at home!

Thus, the end of an era, and the beginning of a new one.

Cross-posted from Creatures of Prometheus

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Tonight: Dr. Paul Hsieh on Surviving Socialized Medicine

By Diana Hsieh

In tonight's episode of Philosophy in Action Talk Radio, I'll interview my own Dr. Paul Hsieh on surviving socialized medicine. That might be of interest to some of you, hence, this announcement!

  • What: Philosophy in Action Talk Radio: Surviving Socialized Medicine

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh, with Dr. Paul Hsieh, plus live callers

  • When: Wednesday, 25 July 2012, 6 pm PT / 7 pm MT / 8 pm CT / 9 pm ET

  • Where: Philosophy in Action's Live Studio
With ObamaCare confirmed by the Supreme Court, what can a person do to preserve his health under America's increasingly socialized system of medical care?

Dr. Paul Hsieh is a physician in practice in South Denver. He is the co-founder of Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine (FIRM). He has written nearly 100 op-eds, mostly on health care policy, as well as articles for The Objective Standard. He blogs offbeat tech news at GeekPress.

To join the live broadcast and its chat, just point your browser to Philosophy in Action's Live Studio a few minutes before the show is scheduled to start. By listening live, you can call the show with your questions and experiences, as well as post comments and questions in the text chat.

If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio from the episode posted here: Talk Radio: 25 July 2012.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts every Sunday morning and Wednesday evening. For information on upcoming shows and more, visit the Episodes on Tap.

I hope that you join us tonight!

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Saturday, July 21, 2012

Preview: Sunday Q&A Radio: Expressing Love, Security Flaws, Happiness, and More

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday morning's episode of Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on expressions of love, exposing security flaws, the nature of happiness, the importance of a candidate's views on abortion, and more with Greg Perkins. Don't miss this engaging hour-long discussion on the application rational principles to the challenges of real life!

  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio Show

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 22 July 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live
This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: Expressions of Love: What do you think of the "Five Love Languages"? The basic idea of the "Five Love Languages" is that every person has "a primary way of expressing and interpreting love," and that "we all identify primarily with one of the five love languages: Words of Affirmation, Quality Time, Receiving Gifts, Acts of Service, and Physical Touch." What do you think of this concept? Do you think that a person's "love language" might be connected to his personality traits?


  • Question 2: Exposing Security Flaws: Is it moral to post information on security flaws that can help criminals better commit crimes? Some people publish information on how to pick locks or how to bypass computer password protection programs. Yes, sometimes this information might be used by good people to better protect themselves, but it's likely that criminals will use it to commit crimes, perhaps crimes that they'd not have attempted otherwise. Can the person posting the information rightly say, "This information can be used for both good or bad purposes, and I'm not morally responsible for what someone else chooses to do with it"?


  • Question 3: The Nature of Happiness: What is happiness? When philosophers such as Aristotle, John Stuart Mill, Immanuel Kant, and Ayn Rand speak of happiness, what do they mean? Is happiness just a fleeting sensation of pleasure? Or is it something more enduring and stable?


  • Question 4: The Importance of a Candidate's Views on Abortion: How important are a political candidate's views on abortion? Why should we be worried about a political candidate's bad views on abortion if their views on other issues like economics are generally good? After all, as US President, Mitt Romney couldn't outlaw abortion even if he wanted to. But a good or bad President could have a tremendous good or bad effect on our economic liberties. Conversely, President Obama wants to keep abortion legal but that positive pales in significance to his terrible negative views on economics. Shouldn't a candidate's views on economics be more important at present than their views on abortion?
After that, we'll tackle some impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 22 July 2012. From that page, you can post comments on the questions before or after the broadcast.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live every Wednesday evening and Sunday morning. Take a peek at the Episodes on Tap for the scoop on upcoming shows!

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, newsletter, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to any past episode or question. And visit the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming episodes.

I hope that you'll join us on Sunday morning!

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Friday, July 20, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #120

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Beth Mazur presents If not nanny state, then what? posted at Weight Maven, saying, "I don't think nanny state is the way to go to address obesity, but not for the reason you might think."

Julie Campbell presents watermelon gazpacho posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "this is an awesome twist on summery gazpacho."

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Paleo BLT Sandwich with Egg and Mayo, A Complete Breakfast or Lunch posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Nothing better than a delicious BLT on fluffy Paleo Bread! Great for breakfast or lunch or on the go! Our sandwiches are to die for!"

Megh presents Recovering from Vegetarianism: Post-Vegetarian Guilt posted at Yolks, Kefir, & Gristle, saying, "How do we handle the (usually self-imposed) guilt that often comes from eating meat when we've told ourselves for so long not to?"

Douglas Robb presents WHEN you Eat can make you Fat posted at Health Habits, saying, "Modern science is finally catching up with the fact that obesity is much more than calories in vs. calories out. Part of that equation - what you eat - is the reason why Paleo eating is growing in popularity at an unprecedented rate. Another factor - when you eat - is being addressed by the research cited in this article."

Susie T. Gibbs presents Tuesday Taco Nites for Paleo Pleasure posted at Fluffy Chix Cook, saying, "Low carb crunchy taco shells put the FUN back into FUNctional foods! Eat tacos like you mean it - knife and fork optional. Too often when making the switch to a paleo lifestyle, we miss out on the crunch factor and also on the habitual component of eating - such as picking a hamburger or taco up with our hands to eat it. Crispy taco shells take care of both of those challenges and bring satisfaction."

Fatisfied presents Contrology posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "A video sampling demonstrating the use of Contrology- the study of (muscle) control."

Diana Hsieh presents My Thyroid and Adrenal Update: Steady on 3 Grains posted at NoodleFood, saying, "Here's my long-overdue update on my thyroid (good) and my adrenals (not so good)."

Neely Quinn presents Are Sweet Potatoes Paleo? posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "A question that often comes up in the Paleo world..."

Peggy Emch presents Why It Sucks to Be Pregnant in America posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "I'd rather be pregnant in a tribe, in the dirt somewhere."

Nell Stephenson presents From Vegan to Paleo; Someone Like Me posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson.

Blair presents Tokelau's Tree of Life posted at The Found Link, saying, "Being able to grow little else besides coconut, the Tokelau islanders make the most of what's available to them."

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents The Truth behind Negative Calorie Foods posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "We provide you with a wealth of information on whether or not, negative calorie foods really do exist. Read this article now to learn more."

Max Ungar presents Mark Sisson Exchange posted at Caveman College, saying, "An awesome interview with Mark on staying primal in college!"

Warren Wilkinson presents A Nutrition Comparison of 5 diets posted at Plate Smarter, saying, "What is the nutritional profile of a single meal? I've compared meats with meats, and vegetables with vegetables. Now let's see the overall vitamin, fat, and mineral difference between a Steak & salad, a vegan meal, and a McDonalds Big Mac combo."

Amy Kubal presents Pale-'O'-lympics: Go for the Gold posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Do you have the mind and attitude of a champion? Find out if you've got what it takes to take home the gold!!"

Crystal Meadows presents Paleo, Shmaleo posted at Against the Grain, saying, "Don't do anything "because the caveman did it". Think for yourself!"

Nicole Markee presents Intermittent Fasting posted at Astrogirl's Adventures, saying, "I have never had anything nice to say about IF in the past, but it seems to be a much different thing for me now that weight loss is not my goal."

Hadass Eviatar presents Thoughts on Mayonnaise, Paleo and Local Eating posted at My Coat of Many Colours.

Cavechic presents Tea and the paleo diet posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "What is the best way to enjoy tea and still stick with your paleo diet? Stop by and find out."

Amy presents Paleo vs. Atkins posted at Paleosophy, saying, "Many people who don't know much about Paleo ask me if it's just another version of Atkins and my answer is always that it's very, very different. This post is an easy way to explain the difference to even the most skeptical critic."

Suz Crawt presents Paleo Weight Loss posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "Breaking through the weight loss plateau on a Paleo Diet"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Monday, July 16, 2012

The Stress That is Killing You

By Christian Wernstedt

[Originally posted over at the VitalObjectives Blog]


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Saturday, July 14, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Philosophy in Action Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday morning's episode of Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on multiculturalism and tolerance, speaking out against bigotry, acting out emotions versus acting on emotions, justified war, and more with Greg Perkins. Don't miss this engaging hour-long discussion on the application rational principles to the challenges of real life!

  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio Show

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 15 July 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live
This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: Multiculturalism and Tolerance: What's wrong with multiculturalism? Many people think that "multiculturalism" just means being tolerant of people with different cultural practices than your own. Is that right? What is multiculturalism? What are some examples of it? What's wrong with it, if anything?

  • Question 2: Speaking Out Against Bigotry: When should a person speak up against bigotry toward gays? My boyfriend and I were at a party at the home of one of his coworkers. One person at the party started using offensive homophobic slurs, so I asked him not to use that kind of language. He persisted, and the conversation escalated into an argument. My boyfriend did not take a position, and he later said he “didn’t want to get involved” and that it had been “none of my business” to stick my neck out against the bigot. I believe that silence implies acceptance. Though there may not be a moral obligation to intervene, it still seems like the right thing to do. What is the moral principle behind this? Is it important enough to end a relationship over?

  • Question 3: Acting Out Emotions Versus Acting On Emotions: What's the difference between acting on emotions and acting out emotions? Emotions sometimes cry out for bodily expression, such as hitting something when you're angry. Is "acting out emotions" in that way a form of emotionalism? How is it different, if at all, from acting on emotions?

  • Question 4: Justified War: When would a free society go to war? What would the attitude of a rights-respecting country be toward war? When would the country go to war – or not? How would wars be funded and manned? Is isolationism or interventionism the proper approach?
After that, we'll tackle some impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 15 July 2012. From that page, you can post comments on the questions before or after the broadcast.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live every Wednesday evening and Sunday morning. Take a peek at the Episodes on Tap for the scoop on upcoming shows!

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, newsletter, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to any past episode or question. And visit the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming episodes.

I hope that you'll join us on Sunday morning!

Read more...

Friday, July 13, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #119

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Cavechic presents We are go for kraut! posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "It worked! I have sauerkraut! Stop by and check it out."

Suz Crawt presents 319 Paleo Foods -- The Definitive Paleo Food List posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "The definitive list of allowed Paleo foods..."

Peter Ballerstedt presents Eating Right on the Road posted at Grass Based Health, saying, "Maintaining my way of eating while traveling for business presents some challenges. Here's some tips and observations."

Nicole Markee presents Elimination Diet posted at Astrogirl's Adventures, saying, "My ALCAT tests explained why a paleo diet didn't have any effect on my chronic skin problems."

Warren Wilkinson presents The Regulations that Create Factory Pig Farms posted at Plate Smarter, saying, "In this post I look at the nature of Pig farming and the tendency for it to be controlled or regulated by government. This regulatory environment doesn't ensure safety, instead it ensures an inferior and inhumane product."

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Paleo Teriyaki Sauce, For Teppanyaki or Hibachi Meats & Vegetables posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Our new Paleo Teriyaki sauce is great on almost anything! From salmon to shrimp, sea scallops to skirt steak and chicken! We even like it for mixed vegetables. This Hibachi/Teppanyaki - style condiment is perfect for any meal."

Nell Stephenson presents Accommodating Guests Who Are Not Paleo posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson.

Megh presents You Want Me to Put Lysol WHERE?!?! posted at Yolks, Kefir, & Gristle, saying, "Some thoughts on the origins of damaging hygienic practices in the early 20th century."

Kristen presents Refreshing the Kitchen posted at Authentic Plate, saying, "Going off track isn't the end of the world, it's being able to get back on that's important."

Kris presents Food Companies Have Blood on Their Hands. . . Childrens' blood posted at Kris Kris, saying, "Food companies market junk towards children, products they know are extremely unhealthy. Then they sponsor the organizations that tell us how to eat."

Laurie Donaldson presents OMG Purple Smoothie posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "If you freeze some of this, you can have it as ice cream later!"

Neely Quinn presents Q&A: Are Sweet Potatoes Paleo? posted at Paleo Plan.

Julie Campbell presents watermelon rind pickles posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "a traditional summer pickle - lots of sugar, yes, but it's a summer treat!!"

Max Ungar presents The Turkish Getup posted at Caveman College, saying, "A great explanation/tutorial video complete with workout suggestions, movement overview, and fun challenges for any level."

Blair presents Greens of the Sea posted at The Found Link, saying, "Using sea vegetables to fortify your internal ocean."

Fatisfied presents Economizing Coconut posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "I prefer the consistency of my variation as it is more appropriate for my uses and I get 4 or more jars for the price I was paying for 1."

Amy Kubal presents Water, Water Everywhere: Let's Get 'High(Hy)'-Drated. . . posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Confused about how much water you should be drinking? Float on over and check out this info!"

Susie T. Gibbs presents Okra and Tomatoes - Steamy Summer Lovin' posted at Fluffy Chix Cook, saying, "Summer in the South can be defined by the steamy co-mingling to okra and tomatoes. Okra, the often misunderstood and maligned, blends with tomatoes, onion and bacon to form a rich and hearty stew that will have you dreamin' of summer!"

Amy presents Primal Life Organics- An Amazing Paleo Skincare Line posted at Paleosophy, saying, "What's the point of eliminating toxins from your diet, if you put them right back in through your personal products? Primal Life Organics has created an amazing line so you don't have to worry anymore."

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents Green Coffee Beans -- Weight Loss Supplement? posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "We provide you with a wealth of information on how Green Coffee Beans are Promoting Weight Loss. Read this article now to learn more."

Peggy Emch presents Hypnobirthing - Hypnosis for Childbirth posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Labor doesn't have to be excruciating. Intense, yes. Sensational and powerful, definitely. But bitterly painful, no. Hypnotherapists would even go so far as to say that it doesn't have to be painful at all."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Thursday, July 12, 2012

My Progress as a CrossFit Outlaw

By Jenn Casey

(This post was originally posted at my blog, Rational Jenn, on July 11, 2012, under the title CrossFit Update. Some relevant facts about me: I'm 41, a homeschooling mom of three kids, and have been doing CrossFit since September 2010 as a way to recover from my previously sedentary lifestyle.)

It's been a while since I've documented my CrossFit progress, so here goes!

I'm about six months into The Outlaw Way, and I still really really enjoy it. This programming is great for me, because of all of the focus on Olympic lifting and building strength in general, as well as short-ish met-cons (when we have them).

There's a terrific interview with Rudy Nielsen (who I call "Mr. Outlaw") at Again Faster that came out just yesterday. There are 15 Outlaws competing at The CrossFit Games (starting--surprise!--today!), one of whom happens to go to the same gym I do, which turns out to have been a lucky happenstance for little old me, because otherwise I'd probably be at a CF gym that follows the more traditional programming.

I have been working very hard over the last six months, and I think I have a lot to show for it. Here are some recent accomplishments.

New Personal Records (PRs):


  • Deadlift: 255# (there's a video of this on my FB page--let me know if this link works)
  • Bench Press: 120#
  • Squat: 215#
  • Press: 80#
  • CrossFit Total (Squat plus Press plus Deadlift): 550
  • Run 400m: 1:37 
  • Run 1 mile: 9:20 (believe me when I say this is truly unprecedented)
  • 5K: 31:45 (previous PR was 35:22 I think)
  • Box Jump Height: 24" (you don't know what it cost me to try for that, but I'm glad I did)
  • Strict Dead-Hang Unassisted Pull Up: 1 (believe me when I say this was truly impossible)


There are lots and lots of things I can do now, such as double unders (more than one in a row--I'm working to get to 10 in a row), and strict toes-to-bar, and handstand push ups (still not quite to depth, but I'm getting better), and turkish get ups (super fun), and I even climbed the rope a bit!

My Olympic lifts are coming along nicely, though I haven't hit any PRs in weight in a good long while. I'm still at 90# for snatch (power snatch), and 125# for (power) clean and jerk. So that might not sound impressive on the surface.

HOWEVER, my technique and form is miles ahead of where it was. I think of Oly lifting like I remember practicing musical instruments. We do drill after drill after drill in Outlaw, five days a week. So I'm practicing constantly, and I think that is what leads to improvement in Olympic lifting. So we are doing high pulls and heavy pulls and stop pulls, snatches and cleans off boxes of differing heights, split jerks and push jerks. Sometimes we put these moves all together; sometimes not. And though I haven't hit any max weight PRs, I am doing these drills at progressively heavier and heavier weights, and that is no small accomplishment.

Here I am doing a couple of clean and jerks back in May:











And here is a snatch:











It's really a lot like practicing scales and finger exercises on the piano. Each exercise focused on a different aspect of technique, and practicing them (though the repetition was sometimes dull) was the way to improve your technique overall. So when you played the piece you were working on, you were that much better.

I love the Oly drills. It's the first thing we do each day. It requires so much more thoughtful attention than I ever imagined. It's as much a mental exercise as it is a physical one. When my brains are turned on, I generally lift better. When I can't settle down and focus, I'm a complete spaz. I love it so much! I really need to take more videos of my lifts, since that really helps, too, to observe one's technique.

I finally got lifting shoes, about a month ago. I decided that if I was going to be serious about all of this lifting, then I needed to break down and get the ugliest shoes known to humankind to wear while lifting. I like them a lot, though they took some getting used to. In other equipment acquisition news, I also got a jump rope, which I'm hoping will help my double under efforts. At the very least, it will be nice not to have to spend 10 minutes adjusting the gym ropes to my height (apparently I'm one of the shortest people at the gym and only Amazon giants use the gym ropes).

I am still holding my own, old lady non-young-whippersnapper that I am. After that initial adjustment period, I don't have tons of residual DOMS and I haven't managed to hurt myself. I've been getting semi-regular sports massages and that is lovely. I have had a few spectacular Oly lift fails (always fun in a crowded gym full of spectators!), but I am choosing to look at those fails as "opportunities to learn how to get out of the way of the bar more quickly." :D

So what's next? I originally gave myself 5-6 months of trying The Outlaw Way to see if I liked it and if I got results. And the verdict: I like it and I get results! So I am sticking with it for the foreseeable future.

I signed up for the Festivus Games, a CrossFit competition for beginner and intermediate people (Festivus, the competition for the rest of us, get it?) and that will be August 4. I'm nervous/excited because this will be my first foray into CF competitions (not counting The Open I guess). No matter how I do, though, it'll be more interesting than running a 5K, that's for sure.

A bunch of us from ATLOS (join us!) will be doing the Gladiator Rock'n Run in September. It will be my first mud run/obstacle course event, and having lots of fun people to go with will make it an awesome experience!

And later in September, I will be taking the Level 1 CrossFit certification class! There are two reasons I'm going for the L1--first, I'm just interested in what they have to say and what I can learn. The main reason is that it's a prerequisite for the CrossFit Kids certification class that I'll be taking in October!

I'm excited about being able to teach some CFKids classes at some point in the future, and I need to get these certs out of the way in order to do that. I don't have immediate plans to teach, but I think the CFKids market is exploding and there will be lots of opportunities in my area. It will not be something I can do full-time at first, but my kids are only getting older (sigh) which means I will one day be able to--gasp!--leave them at home for a couple of hours while I go out and do something. So these classes will be, I hope, an investment in my future, both short-term and long-term.

I have some specific personal CrossFit goals and stuff, too. I'd like to get 10 double unders in a row at some point in my life. I want to do a strict pull up each day so I don't forget how, and to build strength so that one day I will be able to do two, and then three, etc. A sub-30 minute 5K would be amazing, and I think that is a goal within reach. I want to increase my numbers on my lifts, too--I truly think it's possible that I could a 300# deadlift one day (I did get 270# a few inches off the ground the night I got my PR). That will be a fun goal to work toward! And I will get a 95# snatch--even if it's a power snatch--I WILL get that one day.

So that's where I am with CrossFit these days! Still loving it, having fun, enjoying the effects on my health and the shape of my muscles. Look me up on Fitocracy if you want to chat about daily workouts and goals and Oly lifting in a more detailed way. And check out this Outlaw stuff--it's totally awesome!

Here's a recent picture of me and my seven year old daughter, showing off our muscles (and a bit of The World's Ugliest Bathroom here at Wildhaven):

We rock, don't we?

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Monday, July 09, 2012

My Thyroid and Adrenal Update: Steady on 3 Grains

By Diana Hsieh

My last thyroid report was just about a year ago. So wow, it's time for an update!

As of last July, I'd just seen a new doctor -- Dr. Juetersonke in Colorado Springs. He was willing to raise my dose of desiccated thyroid from 2 grains to 3 grains -- even though my TSH was already too low by conventional standards -- based on my persistent symptoms of hypothyroidism, plus my low Free T3 and Free T4. (Even when I was seriously mentally and physically disabled by hypothyroidism, my TSH was never terribly high -- just 3.23. So that I'd need to keep a lower-than-usual TSH isn't too surprising.)

The results of that increased dose to 3 grains were excellent. My thyroid symptoms vanished, and they've not returned. My lab values are good too, and they're stable. Happily, my thyroid antibodies (particularly Antithyroglobulin Ab) have fallen from a high of 123 to within the normal range. Hence, I hope to be able to stay well on 3 grains of desiccated thyroid for the foreseeable future.

Here were my labs from 21 December 2011, after 6 months on three grains of desiccated thyroid:

  • TSH = 0.009 uIU/mL (normal range .3 to 3.0)

  • Free T3 = 4.0 pg/mL (normal range 2.0 to 4.4)

  • Free T4 = 1.18 ng/dL (normal range .82 to 1.77)

  • Antithyroglobulin Ab = 31 IU/mL (normal range 0 to 19)
Here were my lab results from 21 June 2012, after a year on three grains of desiccated thyroid:
  • TSH = 0.010 uIU/mL (normal range .3 to 3.0)

  • Free T3 = 3.4 pg/mL (normal range 2.0 to 4.4)

  • Free T4 = 1.19 ng/dL (normal range .82 to 1.77)

  • Antithyroglobulin Ab = 29 IU/mL (normal range 0 to 40)
Also, I'm still taking high-dose iodine -- 12.5 mg per day at present -- because I've found that my menstrual cycles will not happen without it. I've never had any ill-effects from high-dose iodine, as some people with Hashi's do, and I wonder if that's because I've always taken 200 mcgs of selenium with it. (I've read that the bad reaction of some people with Hashi's to iodine might be due to selenium deficiency, not the iodine per se.)

Alas, I've not had such great success with my adrenal insufficiency. I've gone from two adrenal supplements per day a year ago up to three, down to two, down to one, down to zero, up to one, and now up to two. My recent increase is partly due to a less potent batch of pills than before. (That's a common problem.) However, it's also just too damn easy for me to push myself into sheer exhaustion. If I combine too much exertion with lack of sleep -- as almost always happens when I travel -- I'm toast. The result is feeling sleepy and unmotivated from morning until night, even on a good night of sleep. In my recent appointment, Dr. Juetersonke gave me some suggestions for dealing with that better, so hopefully I'll get that sorted out soon.

Oh, and I should mention that my elimination diet for gut repair is still ongoing and still working. I've kept off the ten pounds that I lost early in the diet without any trouble. I'm tolerating a wider range of foods, including beef and some dairy. I'm not out of the woods yet, but the path that our own Christian Wernstedt of Vital Objectives laid out for me is working well.

Overall: YAY, I'M PRETTY DARN GOOD!

Read more...

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Hsieh Forbes OpEd: Is President Obama's Prostate Gland More Important Than Yours?

By Paul Hsieh

Forbes.com has just published my latest OpEd, "Is President Obama's Prostate Gland More Important Than Yours?"

My theme is that you should enjoy the same freedom to make medical decisions as President Obama.

Snarkier version of the theme: "Medical freedom for me, but not for thee."

Here is the opening:

When President Obama turned 50 last year, he made an "informed patient request" for a PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) test. This is the blood test routinely used to screen men over 50 for possible prostate cancer. The President received his PSA test. But under ObamaCare, you may not be able to.
Now that ObamaCare has been upheld by the Supreme Court, all of its major provisions will be in force, not just the controversial “individual mandate.” This includes government medical practice guidelines that will affect millions of Americans...
(Read the full text of, "Is President Obama's Prostate Gland More Important Than Yours?")

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Saturday, July 07, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Philosophy in Action Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday morning's episode of Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on the validity of psychic powers, managing office politics, responsibility for wrongdoings of friends, the cost of freedom, and more with Greg Perkins. Don't miss this engaging hour-long discussion on the application rational principles to the challenges of real life!

  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio Show

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live
This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: The Validity of Psychic Powers: Are psychic powers bunk? A friend convinced me to join him in visiting a psychic for a tarot card reading. Although I am opposed to mysticism, I didn't mind going and thought it would be funny. I was surprised to find this psychic knew things about me that (while vague) were very accurate descriptors, and could not have been known from my appearance (nor prior knowledge since it was an impromptu visit). It seems highly unlikely they could have guessed (and have guessed so accurately) correct character traits, issues and feelings. Is this evidence in favor of psychic powers? Or have I been mislead?


  • Question 2: Managing Office Politics: How can a person effectively manage office politics? In almost any job, the internal politics of the company can be overwhelming. If you speak out, you can be embroiled in conflict and drama. If you stay silent, the pushy people will have their way, often for the worse. What should a person do who wants to actually work?


  • Question 3: Responsibility for Wrongdoings of Friends: Am I responsible for the actions of my friends? Suppose that a friend of mine does something that others find objectionable. Am I obliged to state my opinion of what my friend did? If I refuse to state an opinion, should others assume that I endorse my friend's actions? In general, should we expect people to speak out if they object to what others do? When is a person obliged to speak in protest?


  • Question 4: The Cost of Freedom: Shouldn't freedom be "free"? I often hear the bromide "freedom isn't free," or some variation of it, such as, "there's a price for freedom." But isn't freedom actually free? A person acts by right in pursuing his own life and happiness, and criminals do not have any right to coerce or threaten others. If freedom is the political expression of rights in a social or political context, it follows that there should be no "cost" to exercising one's rights. It isn't a sacrifice to not violate others rights, since respect for them is a selfish virtue, nor would it be a sacrifice to voluntarily fund a proper government that protects one's rights, since the benefit outweighs the cost. Am I correct in thinking freedom, properly understood and protected, is indeed free, or not? If I am, what do people mean when they say, "freedom isn't free," and what's the proper response?

After that, we'll tackle some impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 8 July 2012. From that page, you can post comments on the questions before or after the broadcast.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live every Wednesday evening and Sunday morning. Take a peek at the Episodes on Tap for the scoop on upcoming shows!

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, newsletter, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to any past episode or question. And visit the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming episodes.

I hope that you'll join us on Sunday morning!

Read more...

Friday, July 06, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #118

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Wenchypoo presents Taking My Delusions One More Step Off the Commercial Grid posted at W9sdom From Wenchypoo's Old Bat Cave, saying, "I got lambasted by liberals for mentioning gardening as a solution to the SNAP funds loss, as SNAP covers garden seeds."

Julie Campbell presents curry apricot relish posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "a lovely summer relish using fresh, seasonal apricots."

Holly presents Bison Sweet Potato Chili posted at Holly Would If She Could, saying, "Need to work on your game? Well, your game cooking, that is...check out this nutrient dense chili recipe perfect to cook up on a Sunday and enjoy all week long."

Kris presents Is Eating Too Much Protein Bad For You? The Not-So-Bitter Truth posted at Kris Kris, saying, "Is eating too much protein bad for you? This is a common myth in health and nutrition circles, let's take a look at the evidence and see if it's true."

Blair presents Pro to the Pros posted at The Found Link, saying, "Julie Burns, MS, RD, CCN; nutritionist to the 2010 Stanley Cup champs advocates Weston A. Price principles, connecting to our hunter and gatherer past, and eating real food (clean protein, higher fat, and lower carbs) for optimal sports performance."

Ute presents Pork Tenderloin and Asparagus posted at Grokette's Primal Musings, saying, "A delicious and easy recipe, that is always a big hit around here."

Neely Quinn presents Our Mostly Paleo Wedding posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "Our guests enjoyed fantastic Paleo foods and they hardly knew the difference!"

Susie T. Gibbs presents Year Round Comfort - Turkey Meatloaf is Perfectly Paleo posted at Fluffy Chix Cook, saying, "Mushrooms and veggies replace the bread filler from Mama's old meatloaf. Flavor explosion and moist meatloaf are the results of losing the grains and gaining the veggies. The slimmed down version gives comfort in every bite and won't leave you stuffed and bloated."

Laurie Donaldson presents July, July! posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Garden update (and yes, I eat potatoes sometimes)."

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Paleo Red White & Blue Fruit Pizza, A treat for a 4th of July Picnic posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This recipe for dairy free fruit pizza is great for any cookout, picnic or get together! Its simple to make and refreshing on a warm summer day. Looking for more block party recipes? We got you covered with our Sweet Potato Salad, Chicken Salad, Pulled Pork and more!"

Susan Holland (MeJane) presents Eggs Eggs abd Marrowbone posted at weightless in Water/ Paleo, saying, "Will eggs, eggs and marrow bone make your old man blind? Hah!"

Nell Stephenson presents Umami Paleo? posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Can Umami be incorporated into a Paleo Lifestyle?"

Fatisfied presents Zuke Noodles posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "No more soggy lasagna!"

Megh presents Recovering from Vegetarianism: Digesting Meat posted at Yolks, Kefir, & Gristle, saying, "Have you ever struggled with digesting meat? What has helped you?"

Peggy Emch presents Don't Overcook Your Meat! posted at The Primal Parent.

Max Ungar presents "Spaghetti with Basil Pesto" posted at Caveman College, saying, "A delicious summer recipe! This Basil pesto will send your mouth into a daze with its tangy, delicious garlic! Great for any primal summer barbeque!"

Brittney presents Crockpot Honey Apple Pork Loin posted at CrossFit + Paleo = A Winning Combination, saying, "A crockpot experimentation ended up being a fabulous meal! Enjoy! Also, if you're interested in my slightly modified take on PaleOMG's Double Chocolate Energy Bites check out this link! http://mycrossfitpaleojourney.wordpress.com/2012/07/03/double-chocolate-energy-bites/"

Amy Kubal presents The Heat Is On! Keep Your Food Safe posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Picnics, BBQ's and summer fun - it's all great until... E. Coli, 'Sal'monella and 'Liz(s)'teria show up. Keep your food safe!"

Amy Marrero presents The Low Fat Fallacy, Part II posted at Paleosophy, saying, "Many people living a Paleo lifestyle often get the objection that they eat too much fat and cholesterol. The post explores the health benefits of both, specifically how eating fat and cholesterol promotes optimal health."

Victoria presents Natural movement and thoughts on rehab posted at Principle Into Practice, saying, "The idea of practicing natural, human, movement, has become increasingly popular in the fitness world through programs such as MovNat. Could the world of physical rehabilitation benefit from considering evolutionary and instinctive movements as well?"

Jedha presents Paleo Ketchup Alternative. Sweet Bell Pepper Sauce! posted at Paleo Diet Blog, saying, "An easy sweet, delicious sauce to eat instead of ketchup. Enjoy :)"

Marc presents REAL Tomato Sauce posted at Feel Good Eating, saying, "Make yourself some REAL tomato sauce. Easy recipe, unbelievable flavor."

Tony Federico presents Pemmican-Inspired Breakfast Bowl posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Instead of listing "ingredients" why don't we list what's really in our food?"

Todd Dosenberry presents Why the Australian Aborigines Primitive Tribe Fascinates Me Beyond Belief posted at Primal Toad, saying, "I loved reading Nutritional and Physical Degneration and learning about the Primitive tribes that Dr. Price studied. The Autralian Aborigines are my favorite. Learn more about them inside my blog post."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Thursday, July 05, 2012

tinga de pollo y chorizo

By Julie

I'm so ethnic. Fresh off some tacos de buche from Friday night, I was still in the mood for Mexican the next couple days. Since I don't know where to get pig stomach, I settled for making the lowly chicken thigh. Kind of a sorry follow up. Fortunately, this dish turned out really good and if I do decide to venture down Federal Boulevard someday to find some pigs' stomachs in some terrifying meat market, I think they will work well with this tinga.
This dish is also for my lovely friend Rachel, who was looking for some one-pot chicken dishes. I used two, but you could do it with one...and a bowl. She also wanted vegetables in it, and there aren't a ton in here (sorry I'm falling short), but you could add green or red peppers, summer squash, winter squash, or whatever. I probably should have used pumpkin instead of potatoes because I have two sugar pumpkins sitting on my kitchen table, one of which is looking like it wants to get squishy kind of soon. I also have a Cinderella pumpkin on my front porch that I bought on super sale from Whole Foods that I should try roasting. It's really, really big so it might be stringy? I don't know, has anyone eaten one before?? What are they like?
Speaking of stomachs and such, I was in Boston last weekend and went to the inimitable Toro again with my besty Samantha. I was in town for the memorial service for my cousin, Elaine Campbell Lowe. Without wanting to really get into details, it was sad and awful and I'm not sure it's even completely sunk in. I catch myself thinking about our weekend brunches that we'd have when I lived there and I think how it'd be nice to have them again if I ever move back. I guess I just have some memories frozen from before I moved away that still feel current. I ended my trip with an all-too-brief visit with Samantha, and at Toro we ate the disgustingly amazing marrow dish. Be on the lookout, I hope, for another recreation dish from there. Bone marrow with oxtail marmalade. The marmalade moniker seems a little cheap - it's not marmalade, it's braised meat with not a speck of citrus to be found, according to some recipes I've come across - but it was awesome and I want to try making it.
tinga de pollo y chorizo
adapted from a bunch of places, serves about 6

2 1/2 lbs chicken thighs, skin-on and bone-in
6 cups water or chicken broth
2 small yellow onions, quartered
2 teaspoons salt (if you're using water, or if your broth is unsalted)
3 garlic cloves, unpeeled
1 14-oz can fire-roasted tomatoes
2 chipotle chiles, either canned or dried, more if desired
1 teaspoon oregano (preferably Mexican)
1/2 lb uncooked chorizo, casings removed or bought in bulk
1 lb russet potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

1. In a large stock pot, add water/broth, chicken, 1 onion, and optional salt and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Boil covered for 10 minutes, then remove from heat and let sit for another 10 minutes.

2. Transfer the chicken to a plate or cutting board and remove the skin and any big chunks of fat. Shred the meat from the bone, set aside. Discard skin and bones.

3. While the chicken is cooking, heat a well-seasoned cast iron pan over medium heat (or gack! a non-stick) and brown the other onion and garlic cloves for about 5 minutes, turning to brown all sides.

4. Transfer the browned onion and garlic (peel the skin off first) to a blender, along with the can of tomatoes, chipotles, and oregano. Blend until smooth.

5. In the stockpot with the remaining broth, add the potatoes and boil for about 10 minutes, until just getting tender. Scoop out 2 cups of broth with a measuring cup and then drain the rest of the broth from the pot (save for your next soup). Add back in the 2 cups to the potatoes.

6. In that same cast iron that you browned your aromatics, reheat over medium heat and add the chorizo to brown. Gently break it up a little bit - it's nice to have somewhat larger chunks and not completely crumbled.

7. Reheat the big pot over medium and dump in the chorizo, chicken, and blended sauce. Stir and let simmer on low for 10 or more minutes, letting it get to a nice thick consistency.

Note: You can do this in a slow cooker with a few modifications. You're probably still gonna want to brown the vegetables before puréeing. You could also brown the sausage if you want that extra bit of flavor, though it's not necessary, depending on how much time you have.


So pour the blended sauce in the slow cooker, along with the chicken (remove the skins), sausage, potatoes, and 2-3 cups chicken broth. Cook on high for 4 hours, or low for more. Shred the chicken before serving, and discard the bones.

Serve this with avocado slices, some queso añejo, cilantro, or whatever else you like.

This is Elaine, on a fun outing to the best park in Boston. Love you.

This was originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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