Saturday, June 30, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Philosophy in Action Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday morning's episode of Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on knowing your biological parents, second-hand smoke, changing core beliefs with age, man the rational animal, and more with Greg Perkins. Don't miss this engaging hour-long discussion on the application rational principles to the challenges of real life!

  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio Show

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 1 July 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live


This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: Knowing Your Biological Parents: Do adopted people have a right to know who their biological parents are? Some adopted people want to know their biological parents, and knowing one's family medical history could be important to a person. So does a person have a right to know his biological parents? If so, does that apply to children conceived with sperm or egg donors? Do parents giving children up for adoption or donating reproductive tissue have a right to privacy?


  • Question 2: Second-hand Smoke: It is wrong to inflict second-hand smoke on other people? Although smoking is detrimental to a person's health, whether or not someone smokes is (or should be) a matter of his personal choice. However, what is the proper moral and legal status of "second-hand smoke"? If second-hand smoke contributes to the development of respiratory diseases or if others simply find it noxious, shouldn't people refrain from smoking in public or smoking around people who haven't consented to it? In a free society, would and should most workplaces ban smoking? Could second-hand smoke be considered a tort, such that the state should forbid smoking around people who object to it?


  • Question 3: Changing Core Beliefs with Age: Why are older people less likely to change their core beliefs? Recently, I had a conversation with a long-time committed leftist who "blinked" when confronted with the fact that collectivism always fails, and it fails because the underlying theory is wrong in principle. Many people, particularly older people, are unwilling to reconsider their core views, however. As to the reason why, my hypothesis is that older people have significant sunk costs in their philosophy, such that they could not psychologically survive the realization that they were so wrong for so many decades. Is that right? If so, what can be done to help them change for the better, if anything?


  • Question 4: Man the Rational Animal: What does it mean to say that "man is a rational animal"? The fact that man is a rational animal distinguishes him from all other living entities and makes the whole of philosophy possible and necessary. But, taking a step back, what does it mean to say that man is a (or the) rational animal? What is rationality, not as a virtue, but as the essential characteristic of man?
After that, we'll tackle some impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 1 July 2012. From that page, you can post comments on the questions before or after the broadcast.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live every Wednesday evening and Sunday morning. Take a peek at the Episodes on Tap for the scoop on upcoming shows!

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, newsletter, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to any past episode or question. And visit the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming episodes.

I hope that you'll join us on Sunday morning!

Read more...

Friday, June 29, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #117

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Ute presents The Paleo Bread posted at Grokette's Primal Musings, saying, "My thoughts on the new Paleo Bread, and whether or not this is actually Paleo."

Kris presents A Cure for The Biggest Health Problems in The World is Being Ignored posted at Kris Kris, saying, "I believe there is a natural cure for the biggest health problems in the world. It is scientifically proven, but ignored by the health authorities."

Victoria presents Evolutionary Medicine 101 posted at Principle into Practice, saying, "Thoughts from an evolutionary minded med student on what other med students (and anyone interested in health) should keep in the back of their mind as they think about health and disease."

Blair presents Wee Pee Free-ly posted at The Found Link, saying, "A cycle of sustainability that results in higher yields and nutrient content of garden vegetables."

Fatisfied presents Pickle Chips posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "Wanting something similar to fried pickles but with preservation potential, I found my way to making Pickle Chips."

Bob Massarella presents My Ten Rules for Getting and Staying Fit posted at Primal Sphere, saying, "People often ask me how I keep in shape, what do I do. Well, here is it..."

Susie T. Gibbs presents Fried Green Tomatoes - Perfectly Paleo posted at Fluffy Chix Cook, saying, "This isn't your mama's Paleo! Not a spec of Crisco in sight! All of the comfort. None of the crud! Fluffy Chix Cook delicious comfort food with a Texas twang and maybe a tall tale or two for the funofit. If you don't watch it, you might find yourself sayin' howdy and fixinto!"

Megh presents Recovering from Vegetarianism: A New Series posted at Yolks, Kefir, & Gristle, saying, "I've finally gotten back to blogging and am going to be covering how to recover from vegetarianism in a series of posts. If you are a former vegetarian, what is your story? What was hardest about recovering from vegetarianism?"

Beth Mazur presents Evolutionary Medicine posted at Weight Maven, saying, "the Palo Alto Institute has posted the videos from their recent Evolutionary Medicine seminar. I found the session on behavior to be particularly interesting."

Suz Crawt presents 21 Paleo Lunch Ideas posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "21 Paleo brown-bag lunch ideas"

Sara Hatch presents Update: Experiment of One (Week Two) posted at Edible, saying, "The second update on my Primal Ketogenic diet experiment..."

Rafael presents ¿Por que el trigo no es un buen alimento? posted at COMA MEJOR, saying, "Hi, Rafael from Argentina with a Paleo Post in Spanish"

Tony Federico presents The Paleo Restaurant Project posted at Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Paleo is growing and restaurants have taken notice! Have you spotted a "Paleo" item on your favorite menu?"

Todd Dosenberry presents My Top 10 Reasons Why Your Top 10 Reasons Your Not Paleo Are Flawed posted at Primal Toad, saying, "Ann Marie from Cheeseslave decided to let the world know why she is not Paleo. I'm totally fine with others expressing there feelings. However, I decided to step in because her reasonings are flawed and incorrect. Paleo is NOT low carb and is NOT a fantasy, etc. Paleo is a framework that every individual needs to experiment with and then decided what is best for them."

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Paleo Caesar Salad Dressing, A Creamy Sauce for Salads and Chicken posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This Caesar Salad Dressing is perfect over a bed of Romaine lettuce with our Grilled Chicken and Paleo Croutons recipes! Keepin' it Paleo has never tasted so good!"

Susan Holland (MeJane) presents PALEO: Is it Just Me, or Are Labels Getting Invisible? posted at Weightless in Water, saying, "A remedy for microscopic labels on store products... and a gold mine for paleo products suppliers! MeJane is having brilliant thoughts at the supermarket."

Neely Quinn presents Sleep Part 3: How To Get More of It posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "Some practical advice on how to get more sleep."

Warren Wilkinson presents Not all Organic Eggs are Made Equal posted at Plate Smarter, saying, "After spending 3 times more on organic eggs, I find that they are raised the same as conventional eggs."

Nell Stephenson presents Paleo, Migrains and RA posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "There is a huge disconnect between diet and health issues; this post focuses on Migraines and RA."

Travis Schefcik presents How Toxic Is Sugar posted at Uncommon Wellness, saying, "Enjoy!"

Jim Arthur Van Wyck presents The Paleo Mom.com: Sarah Ballantyne Video Interview posted at Paleo Diet News, saying, "Jim Arthur interviews Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D. about her blog The Paleo Mom. Sarah discusses her 120 pound weight loss, and how the paleo diet was her path to regaining her health."

Adam Farrah presents Crack is the New Yoga??? posted at Practical Paleolithic, saying, "Blog post about pop culture idiocy and New York Magazine's recommendation of Xanax as a "solution" to the stress of modern life..."

The Cavechic presents Christians and the paleo diet posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "Can a Christian eat according to the paleo diet without compromising their faith?"

Melissa Joulwan presents Tuesday 10: Paleo Flavor Boosters posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "Ten tips for quick, easy flavor boosters you can add to meat+veg so you never get bored."

Kelly Bejelly presents Dry Rubbed Oven Baked Spare Ribs posted at A Girl Worth Saving, saying, "A Sugar-Free dry rub that I created for my Oven Baked Spare ribs."

Brittney Beckham presents CrossFIt + Paleo = A Winning Combination posted at Spaghetti with Mildly-Spicy Meatballs, saying, "This is a wonderful original recipe! It's a great comfort food type recipe and will be a go-to for us in the future!"

Penny Price McIntosh presents Raw Milk Farm Video Tour posted at Health Coach Penny, saying, "This is a video of my trip to a local farm that sells raw milk. Sherry the 'milk lady' is a total trip!"

Alison Pierce presents The King of All Beef Stews posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "Beef Bourguignon, a Paleo stew that's humble yet kingly; simple yet complex in flavor."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Monday, June 25, 2012

Pottenger's "Superior Man in Medicine" is Probably You

By Christian Wernstedt

[From the Vital Objectives blog]

In terms of therapeutic doctrine, mainstream medicine has traveled backward since the first half of the 1900s. Pioneers of physiology would roll in their graves if they saw what's going on today.

Physiologist Francis Pottenger ("Symptoms of Visceral Disease", 1919) wrote:

"Though I have devoted myself to the study of diseases of the chest—a so-called -'specialty' —for more than twenty years, experience has led me to see that such a thing as a medical specialty in the accepted sense of the term, can not exist. Diseases can not be divided into those of this and that organ; for the human body is a unit. One part can not be diseased without affecting other parts. No organ can be understood except in its relationship to other organs and to the body as a whole."

Pottenger's view should be trivial to observers of the human body, but modern medical textbooks have become sales catalogs for ultra-compartmentalized pharmaceutical treatments. No wonder, modern medicine has become reduced to emergency intervention or cargo-cult type "prevention" such as cholesterol-supression.

The general public is as mistaken  – just look at how people seek treatments for "the thyroid" or for acne or for headaches or for virtually any issue without realizing that in most cases (outside broken legs) any problem manifest as symptoms or malfunction in a specific organ or tissue is actually rooted in a body-wide problem. (Check out my acne chart for an example of how something that may look like a skin issue is an issue related to just about everything else in the body.)

Pottenger had a grander vision:

"The superior man in the medicine of the future will not be the great laboratory worker, or the man who is known for his studies in metabolism or the expert gastro- enterologist, or neurologist, or surgeon or he who stands preeminently above his confreres in his knowledge of diseases of the heart and arterial system or of the lungs, but the man who recognizes the fact that the truths derived from all of these sources of study and investigation must be interpreted as belonging to the human patient as a whole—in other words the internist who appreciates the unity of medicine. The distinguished specialist will be one who regards his field of study in its intimate relationships to the body as a whole."

Sadly, almost a hundred years later, we are still waiting for Pottenger's vision to become widely accepted.

However, the situation today is worse than only about compartmentalization and anti-physilogic divisions of the body.

Medieval style guild mentality and refusal to integrate new discoveries or observations that don't fit current dogmas are rampant. Specialists in medicine typically have to be kicked and dragged to look at the actual science in their own fields.

Hence we hear hilarious statements such as "gut flora has nothing to do with IBS" or "gluten is only a problem in celiac disease" or "obesity is only about calories in and calories out".

Continuing education for specialists seems to be mostly about skiing and golfing, but even so, relevant scientific papers are only mouse clicks away on the Internet.

The result of this situation is that patients, as well as anyone who is interested in avoiding becoming a patient, have to educate themselves about basic physiology and as well as proper therapeutic principles so that they themselves can be the "superior man in medicine" and take charge of their own health.

Read more...

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Hsieh Forbes OpEd: The Nanny State and Universal Health Care

By Paul Hsieh

The 6/18/2012 edition of Forbes has posted my latest OpEd, "The Dangerous Synergy Between The Nanny State And Universal Health Care".

A couple of excerpts:

The recurring theme: The government must limit our freedoms to limit overall medical costs. But this issue can only arise in “universal” health systems where taxpayers must pay for everyone else’s medical expenses...
It’s a short step from the government assuming responsibility for your diet to assuming responsibility for your overall health. Today, the government decides what you can or cannot eat. Tomorrow, the government decides what medical care you can or cannot receive.
Note that both Democrats and Republicans buy into the notion of limiting freedom to limit global health costs. One of the big proponents of this idea is former GOP Senate majority leader Bill Frist (who is a cardiac surgeon).

I also quoted a section from one of my favorite Bill Whittle's essays, "Freedom":
"The more your government restricts your options, the more you psychologically look to government to keep you safe, fed, clothed, housed and sustained.
(Read the full text of "The Dangerous Synergy Between The Nanny State And Universal Health Care".)

Note: This is my second piece at Forbes, and I'm honored to once again appear on their website.  My first piece was, "Just Who Should Control Your Healthcare Spending?" (5/16/2012).

Read more...

Saturday, June 23, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Philosophy in Action Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday morning's episode of Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on corporal punishment of kids, parenting as a central purpose, compartmentalized cheating, faith in something greater than the self, and more with Greg Perkins. Don't miss this engaging hour-long discussion on the application rational principles to the challenges of real life!


  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio Show

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 24 June 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live



This week's questions are:

  • Question 1: Corporal Punishment of Kids: Is corporal punishment of children ever proper? The 2011 video of Judge William Adams beating his daughter raises the question of whether it's ever necessary or proper to physically discipline children. Does the age of the child matter, particularly given that you can't reason with younger children? Does the amount of force used matter? When does physical punishment violate the child's rights?


  • Question 2: Parenting as a Central Purpose: Can parenting be a central purpose in life? Many people think that only a career can serve as a person's central purpose. They think that a central purpose must be remunerative, and that it can't be merely temporary. Is that right? Can parenting be a person's central purpose, even if only for a few years?


  • Question 3: Compartmentalized Cheating: Is it true that, "if you cheat on your wife, you'll cheat on your business partner"? A few months ago, a Republican presidential candidate said of Newt Gingrich, "if you cheat on your wife, you'll cheat on your business partner." Leaving aside the specifics of any particular politician's personal life, is the broader principle accurate? If you knew that someone cheated on his wife, does that mean he should be regarded as an untrustworthy for a business partnership? Or as morally unfit to be your doctor? Or as unfit to be an elected official?


  • Question 4: Faith in Something Greater than the Self: Doesn't everyone need to have faith in something greater than themselves? Most people have faith in something greater than themselves – whether God, their community, the state, the environment. Doesn't everyone need that, to help steer them in life? Or do you think that's unnecessary or even wrong?



After that, we'll tackle some impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 24 June 2012. From that page, you can post comments on the questions before or after the broadcast.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live every Wednesday evening and Sunday morning. Take a peek at the Episodes on Tap for the scoop on upcoming shows!

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, newsletter, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to any past episode or question. And visit the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming episodes.

I hope that you'll join us on Sunday morning!

Read more...

Friday, June 22, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #116

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Kristjan presents Not Losing Weight on a Low Carb Diet? Here's What To Do posted at Kris Kris, saying, "Not losing weight on a low-carb diet? Many people lose a lot of weight on low-carb, without even trying. If you're not one of them, then read this."

Melissa Joulwan presents Tuesday 10: Badass Burpee Variations posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "The "do anywhere workout," now with added razzmatazz!"

Susie T. Gibbs presents Six Golden Rules To Great Steak posted at Fluffy Chix Cook, saying, "This isn't your mama's paleo! Not a spec of Crisco for this Texas Chix! All of the comfort. None of the crud! Fluffy Chix Cook delicious comfort food with a Texas twang and maybe a tall tale or two for the funofit. If you don't watch it, you might find yourself sayin' howdy and fixinto!"

Warren Wilkinson presents Eat Insects! Have a Cricket Bar posted at Plate Smarter, saying, "Chapul, an Arizona based startup, is looking for $10,000 kickstart dollars to produce cricket bars. 'Kick in' $20 and you'll be the first to receive one. I've already paid!"

Nell Stephenson presents Getting the Timing Wrong posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Another commonly made error by those new to Paleo..."

Suz Crawt presents Paleo Pet Food posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "What a shock to find out how badly pets are fed!"

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents Super Fuel: Foods That Increase Metabolism posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "We provide you with a wealth of information on which foods can easily increase your metabolism. Read this article "Foods That Increase Metabolism" now."

Peggy Emch presents Caring for Premature Infants With Kangaroo Care posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Doctors and hospitals may not offer the best care for preemies. Mothers are usually a whole lot better than incubators."

Crystal Meadows presents Don't Think. Just Lift. posted at Against the Grain, saying, "Sometimes too much thinking can get in the way of a PR. Focus on the lift, not the weight. Better yet, don't think. Just lift."

Diana Hsieh presents Soft Scrambled Eggs posted at NoodleFood, saying, "These super-soft scrambled eggs are so yummy! They're easy, but they take a bit of extra time. Happily, they're worth it."

The Cavegirls presents Pea Shoot and Walnut Pesto posted at Northwest Cavegirls, saying, "I made up this yummy pesto and then thinned it with my favorite apple cider vinegar and a bit of stevia for a lovely pea shoot and walnut pesto vinaigrette for our salad today. MMM mmm, pick up some of these natural treats and make something exciting with them."

The Cavegirls presents Zucchini Pad Thai posted at Northwest Cavegirls, saying, "Just a quick note to say that Pad Thai is super yum with the zucchini noodles toodles, and chicken, yum. Truly, this new thing with these "veggie noodles" really is makin' my day! Give it a try"

Susan Holland (MeJane) presents Paleo: Dim Sum is the Total of Dim Parts posted at Weightless in Water/Paleo, saying, "Hors d'oeuvres as a main course was always a pipe-dream, but now it's a delectable reality! Making canapes from an 'empty" fridge."

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Paleo Thai Mixed Vegetables, A Stir-fry Medley with Thai Sauce posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This recipe is perfect for a quick meal (under 30 from start to finish!) or cleaning out the vegetable drawer before a trip! We love how easy and delicious it is to make good Thai at home!"

Penny McIntosh presents Simple Is Smart posted at Health Coach Penny, saying, "My quick book review of It 'Starts With Food' by Melissa and Doug Hartwig."

Blair presents Longer Telomeres = Longer Life? posted at The Found Link, saying, "Telomeres, Aging, and Cancer Risk... should telomere growth be promoted, thwarted, or held steady?"

Health Freak Eddy presents Optimal Diet Vs Optimal Life posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "Should you really have an optimal diet? is it possible to have both?"

Julia Campbell presents butter posted at the crankin' kitchen, saying, "homemade butter from raw cream! not much of a recipe, but come on. it's homemade butter."

Amy Kubal presents Let Me See Your 'Grill': Barbecuing -- For Better or For Worse? posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Is grilling healthy? Find out and learn how you can make it better!"

Fatisfied presents Mayo Trick posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "This trick amps up the emulsification and promotes creaminess!"

Adam Farrah presents It's Broken posted at Practical Paleolithic, saying, "A blog post about how the Industrial Age and the Assembly Line mentality has been applied to just about everything - and how that's made a mess..."

Beth Mazur presents The Pleasure Trap posted at Weight Maven, saying, "I take a look at the concept of the pleasure trap, the idea that we're essentially wired to eat more and move less!"

Sara Hatch presents Experiment of One Follow-up posted at Edible, saying, "I'm one week into my Ketogenic Paleo/Primal experiment, and I have some observations..."

Tony Federico presents Is Sea Food Better than Steak? posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Until recently, I had never questioned the notion that seafood was "health food" through and through. But is this true? Is sea food "better" than beef?"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Monday, June 18, 2012

Who is Stealing Dad's Testosterone?

By Christian Wernstedt

[This post comes from VitalObjectives . Like us on Facebook for more on hormones. Thank you! /Christian]

[Like us on Facebook for more on hormones.]

Read more...

Saturday, June 16, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Philosophy in Action Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday morning's episode of Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on objectively assessing yourself, friendships at work, keeping up with the news, child labor laws, and more with Greg Perkins. Don't miss this engaging hour-long discussion on the application rational principles to the challenges of real life!

  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio Show

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 17 June 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live
This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: Objectively Assessing Yourself: How can a person objectively assess his own character? If a person has a good character, then he'll recognize that fact. But if a person has a bad character, then he'll probably deceive himself into thinking himself good. So it seems likely that every person will think that he has a good character, even when that's not true. So, is objective assessment of one's own character possible? If so, how?


  • Question 2: Friendships at Work: Is it wrong to be friends with subordinates at work? Work is a place where you have a certain contractual and moral obligation to the company you work for to put the company's interests ahead. With workplace friendships, particularly with subordinates, this can lead to problematic situations, particularly in maintaining a sense of objectivity both to yourself and among your peers and subordinates. There are also problems with the friendship itself; items that you are not supposed to share with subordinates and big events in your friend's life (looking for another job, for example) that either put you in a rough situation or have to be left out of the friendship entirely. Is being friends with someone who is subordinate to you at work practical or moral?


  • Question 3: Keeping Up with the News: Should I keep up with current affairs? As we know, most reporting is pretty bad. In print, and especially on the rolling 24-hour news channels. It's myopic, biased, and lacking in any principled coverage. The reporters are just clueless, and are like children pointing at all the pretty, crazy colors. But there must be some value in reading the paper, right? Or is it only for people in certain intellectual occupations, whose work involves commentary on the world today? I've not followed current affairs for the last few years myself, and I'm happy for it, but do just worry that I'm missing something.


  • Question 4: Child Labor Laws: Should children be protected by child labor laws? Currently, federal and state governments restricts "child labor" in various ways. The US Department of Labor "restricts the hours that youth under 16 years of age can work and lists hazardous occupations too dangerous for young workers to perform." The goal is to "protect the educational opportunities of youth and prohibit their employment in jobs that are detrimental to their health and safety." Is this a proper function of government? Does it violate the rights of parents, children, and/or employers? If so, what's the harm done?
After that, we'll tackle some impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 17 June 2012. From that page, you can post comments on the questions before or after the broadcast.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live every Wednesday evening and Sunday morning. Take a peek at the Episodes on Tap for the scoop on upcoming shows!

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, newsletter, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to any past episode or question. And visit the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming episodes.

I hope that you'll join us on Sunday morning!

Read more...

Friday, June 15, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #115

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Kris presents The 9 Biggest Lies of Modern Nutrition posted at Kris Kris, saying, "I personally believe modern nutrition to be infested with a lot of corruption and misinformation. Here are the 9 biggest lies of modern nutrition."

Amy Kubal presents Paleo Book Review: The Whole9's It Starts With Food posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "This book is a MUST have for all Paleo followers! Solid, sane advice for healthy living!"

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Paleo Chinese 5-Spice Sauce, A Great Grill Marinade or BBQ Dressing posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Let's start grillin for the weekend! Our Chinese 5-Spice Sauce is great as a marinade or BBQ sauce for chicken or pork and sure to please!"

Jedha presents Is Cheese Allowed On Paleo? posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach.

Nell Stephenson presents Paleo Mistake #3 posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Another commonly made Paleo mistake!"

Peggy Emch presents How Motherhood Changes You: Request for Submissions posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Are you a mom? How are you different now than you were before you had children? Please come by and leave a comment.This is research for my book!"

Sara Hatch presents An experiment of one posted at Edible, saying, "Does low carb paleo work for weight loss? I've been following a Paleo/primal diet since 2006, and unfortunately am gaining weight. I have tried all sorts of approaches, trying to hack my problem. More sleep, less fat, more fat, more veggies, more exercise, less exercise, more protein, less protein, no nightshades, fewer calories, Whole30. Whatever. It has been frustrating. I see this experiment as a chance to take a step back and look at this a little more analytically. The one thing that has worked for me in the past was a ketogenic diet, so here is my experiment..."

Susan Holland (MeJane) presents Coconut Fatigue and ... Reduction posted at Weightless in Water / Paleo, saying, "The quest for flour-like alterntives leads to a time honored gourmet solution: Reduction!"

Joe Lindley presents Is this an American Beverage Association ad in disguise? | Food Politics posted at Craving Sugar News, saying, "Beverage companies have lambasted Mayor Bloomberg with a "Nanny" poster to put him on the defensive about his plans to cut back on sugar drink consumption in New York City. It would be amusing if it wasn't such a serious topic."

Diana Hsieh presents Paleo-Friendly Snacks posted at NoodleFood, saying, "Are you looking for some ideas for paleo-friendly snacks, particularly when from home? Look no further!"

Neely Quinn presents Is The Cost of Eating Paleo Worth It? posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "One of the main concerns with going Paleo is always the cost of the food, so I wanted to take a moment to really clear that argument up."

Beth Mazur presents A daily personal health practice posted at Weight Maven, saying, "my favorite part of Abel James' recent conversation with Dan Pardi (of DansPlan.com) is the concept of a daily health practice."

Julie Campbell presents roasted poblano pork burgers with pipián posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "traditional toasted pumpkin seed sauce over spiced pork burgers - i.love.mexican.food."

Ute presents Self Experimentation posted at Grokette's Primal Musings, saying, "I created a blog post about my struggles with sleep, and how I seem to have overcome them, by cutting out dairy."

Patty presents A Wake-up Call from It Starts With Food posted at Following My Nose, saying, "After reading the new book It Starts With Food, we've decided to "dry out" for a while!"

Blair presents Genetic Tenderness posted at The Found Link, saying, "How Gearld Fry is recapturing grassfed beef genetics."

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #41: Women's health, body composition & fat loss posted at Balanced Bites, saying, "Diane and Liz take on the issue of women's body composition on their latest podcast. Topics discussed; Turtle-like metabolism, my "perfect" weight, how do I lose those last 10 to 20 "Vanity pounds"? and stubborn fat."

Cavechic presents Cooking chicken livers posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "Overcoming Western ideas about eating organ meat can be a challenge, but it is healthy for you and a good source of vitamins and minerals missing from most Western diets. Come by for some links to recipes for cooking chicken livers as an inexpensive way to augment your paleo diet journey."

Cavechic presents Chicken livers part 2 posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "I used the, 'dry fry' method for cooking my chicken livers. Come on by and read about how they turned out."

Jennifer Hunt presents Why Do Doritos Locos Tacos Make Me Weak in the Knees? posted at Vibrant Sexy Strong, saying, "Sometimes nutrition knowledge is not enough to keep me from a Doritos Locos Tacos."

Warren Wilkinson presents Vegetable Nutrition Information: Part 1 - Fats posted at Plate Smarter, saying, "I compare the nutritional value of asparagus, avocado, broccoli, carrot, mushrooms, seaweed and squash. I want to see if vegetables really are the nutritional powerhouse I believe them to be. So far I've found that avocado is a lot like chicken -- at least in terms of fat profile!"

Laurie Donaldson presents One year later... posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "One year of strength training."

Peggy Emch presents Red Bell Pepper "Sandwich" posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Red bell pepper makes the best Paleo "bread" ever!"

Tony Federico presents Seafood Free Seared "Ahi" Salad posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Is seafood really a "better" choice than beef?"

Susan Holland (MeJane) presents Hey, Shorty, Not So Fast! (Thanks, Dad) posted at Weightless in Water / Paleo, saying, "My father, my coach, and his valuable reminder: "not so fast."That tip applies to many things, including cooking proteins."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Monday, June 11, 2012

Paleo-Friendly Snacks

By Diana Hsieh

Recently, I received free samples of "That's It" fruit bars. They're just dried fruit -- no sugar, no preservatives, no nothing, except two kinds of fruit per bar. They're really quite delicious, and they make a good on-the-go snack. If anything, they're a bit too easy to eat. (I'm not anti-fruit, but I try to limit my fruit intake, particularly dried fruit.) If you can't find these bars in your local store, you can buy online.

The "That's It" Fruit Bars got me thinking about other easy paleo snacks, particular when I'm out and about. Here's a few items that I like to mix and match:

  • Diced uncured ham

  • Apple

  • Salami

  • Prosciutto ham

  • Macadamia nuts

  • Diced cheese

  • Hard-boiled eggs

  • Dehydrated fruit

  • Dehydrated roasted sweet potato

  • Lara Bars

  • Grape tomatoes

  • Banana

  • Dark chocolate

  • Sweet potato

  • Chicken breast

  • "That's It" Fruit Bars

  • Greek yogurt
As for the sweet potato and chicken breast: I always keep small portions of them frozen for when I need a full meal while in town, particularly after my SuperSlow workouts.

I'll roast about 20 pounds of sweet potatoes, cool them and remove their skins, and then pack 5 oz into each sandwich bag. I throw all the sandwich bags into a gallon-sized freezer bag, then store that in the freezer. I do the same for sous-vide chicken breast. (That freezes and thaws very nicely.) Then, even if I'm in a big rush, I can grab a sandwich bag of sweet potato and a sandwich bag of chicken for a decent meal.

As for my dehydrated fruit and sweet potatoes, I'll save that for a future post.

What are your favorite paleo-friendly snacks?

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Saturday, June 09, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Q&A Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In the next episode of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, I'll answer questions on staying objective, deliberately unhealthy choices, consuming celebrity news, refuting Marxist arguments, and more. Join us for this lively hour of applying rational principles to the challenges of real life!

  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio Show

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 10 June 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live


This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: Staying Objective: How can a person be certain of his own objectivity? It's often difficult to stick to the facts in reasoning, and it's even harder to make sure that you're focused on all and only the relevant facts. How can a person know that he's being objective – as opposed to relying on unwarranted assumptions, ignoring relevant facts, or rationalizing what he wants to be true?


  • Question 2: Deliberately Unhealthy Choices: Is it moral to smoke, drink, or eat unhealthy foods if one recognizes the costs of doing so? Suppose a friend makes a deliberate decision to eat foods he know to be unhealthy (such as frequent sugary desserts). He knows that it might harm his health, but he says that the personal enjoyment and satisfaction outweigh the risk of shortened lifespan and possible future harmful health effects. In other words, he claims he is making a rational choice to maximize his overall happiness. If he's truly weighed all the relevant factors without evading the consequences and makes an informed choice to eat those desserts – or engaging in similar unhealthy choices such as drinking or smoking to excess – can that be moral?


  • Question 3: Consuming Celebrity News: Is consuming celebrity news self-destructive? Is there anything wrong with being interested in celebrities and entertainment news? Does "celebrity culture" foster destructive values in people?


  • Question 4: Refuting Marxist Arguments: How can I effectively counter Marxist economic arguments? My family and friends often advocate Marxist economic ideas – for example, that wealth should be redistributed according to need, that corporations and corporate profits are evil, and that rich people have too much money. How can I best respond to these arguments?
After that, I'll answer a set of impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 10 June 2012. From that page, you can post comments on the questions before or after the broadcast.

Also, be sure to Connect with Us via social media, newsletter, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to the audio from whole episodes or just selected questions. And visit the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming broadcasts.

I hope to see you in the chat on Sunday morning!

Read more...

Friday, June 08, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #114

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Julianne presents Extra Virgin Olive Oil - Or is it? European supermarket oils are rancid and fail the EVOO test posted at Julianne's Paleo & Zone Nutrition, saying, "A New Zealand Consumer TV programme, decided to quality test EVOO oils from supermarkets in New Zealand following reports from studies in Australia and California that showed 80% and 69% respectively were not in fact EVOO quality. The results showed all were below standard."

Julianne presents Paleo Nutrition Seminar Auckland New Zealand posted at Julianne's Paleo & Zone Nutrition, saying, "I've scheduled a paleo nutrition seminar in Auckland New Zealand. Please pass this on to anyone in the vicinity - I'd love to have them (or you) participate."

Warren Wilkinson presents What 'Free Range' really means in Chicken Hatcheries and Egg Production. posted at Plate Smarter, saying, "Modern chicken farming has produced a fowl that lives a life very different than its ancient ancestors. Unfortunately, industry terms like 'free run', 'free range' and 'organic' mean pretty much nothing."

Meghan Little & Angel Ayala Torres presents Paleo Tomato Sauce with Mushrooms, An Italian Sauce for Spaghetti posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This spaghetti sauce is so good, you'll want to put it on everything! Try it with Spaghetti Squash and our delicious Meatballs for the best dinner in town!"

Hadass Eviatar presents Spring Paleo Manitoba Supper posted at My Coat of Many Colours, saying, "Spring and summer are precious in Manitoba, where there is snow on the ground six months of the year. Lovely local produce makes a great supper."

Joe Lindley presents Why one meat producer says a burger should be as expensive as lobster posted at Craving Sugar News, saying, "This is an interesting perspective (from a grass-fed beef meat producer) on how the typical hamburger you find in the grocery store is produced. A bit unsettling..."

Beth Mazur presents Dr. Vera Tarman on food addiction posted at Weight Maven, saying, "I found Sean Croxton's podcast with Dr. Vera Tarman on food addiction to be very interesting. Here are some highlights."

Penny Price McIntosh presents Paleo Bumper Stickers Available Now posted at Health Coach Penny, saying, "As Will Ferrell exclaimed in 'Elf', "I'm in love, I'm in love and I don't care who knows it". Tell the world you speak Paleo with these stick figure bumper stickers."

Riki Shore presents Cumin and Citrus Roasted Carrots posted at Three Squares, saying, "Roasted lemon and orange juice add a refreshing note to roasted carrots. Great with fish, beef or chicken."

Nell Stephenson presents Paleo Moms & Babies posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo moms & babies both benefit!"

Diana Hsieh presents Institute for Justice Fights for Free Speech Rights of Paleo Blogger posted at NoodleFood, saying, "The Institute for Justice is defending the free speech rights of one of our own: Steve Cooksey. He's been targeted by North Carolina regulators for advocating a low-carb paleo diet to diabetics like himself."

Health Freak Eddy presents Ultimate one rule diet posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "The twist is its not a diet, or a rule"

Health Freak Eddy presents The Real Cost Of Being Fat posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "This really makes you realise how bad its getting"

MeJane (Susan Holland) presents PALEO: Transition, eh? posted at Weightless in Water/ Paleo, saying, "As a "newbie" to the Paleo/primal diet, I am at a plateau, otherwise named a transition. It's a puzzling time for me, and I am wondering how others moved through this little knothole. "

Peggy Emch presents History and Benefits of Fermented Foods posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "How to make kombucha. What types of fermented foods other cultures eat. And what good fermented foods are for our bodies."

Neely Quinn presents Is Paleo Good for Menopausal Women? posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "I think it sucks that Paleo has become so intertwined with the CrossFit scene that a 50 year-old woman doesn't think it would be good for her. People of all ages, including babies, children, adults, and the elderly, can and do benefit from eating Paleo."

Tony Federico presents The Caveman Kettlebell Challenge posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Take the Caveman Kettlebell Challenge (CKC) and find out your score! Are you a "green smoothie" or an "alpha auroch"?"

Fatisfied presents Livin' is Easy posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "Summertime offerings... G(row)IY and sweetening with Stevia, a good read, A course in Critter Processing, and Moonshine."

Laurie D. presents It is summer now posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Some of the first bounty from the garden..."

Warren Wilkinson presents Healthy Meals from Healthy Foods: Foods with Protein Part 1 - Fats posted at Plate Smarter, saying, "An exploration of the Omega 3 and Omega 6 fat profile of several household meats. With pretty graphs!"

Penny Price McIntosh presents The Truth Will Piss You Off posted at Health Coach Penny, saying, "This post is an apology to all my past clients who I subjected to the low calorie, low fat, high carb, do more, eat less, stay hungry...LIE."

Amy Kubal presents New!! 'Only Paleo' App: The Place To Go When You Want To Know posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Do you have "Is it Paleo?" food questions? Now "there's an app for that!""

Chris Tamme presents HFCS Goes Toe to Toe with Cane Sugar posted at Primal Roar, saying, "The Cron Refiner's Association is picking on, what should be, an ally."

Jedha presents How To Make Poached Eggs posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach, saying, "Sounds like a simple thing to do but surprisingly heaps of people don't know how to make poached eggs. In today's cooking show Paul shows you how super simple it really is. Enjoy :)"

Victoria presents Speed Dating for Medical Students posted at Principle into Practice, saying, "The trials and tribulations of an evolutionary-minded future physician as she tries to figure out how to combine evolutionary principles and modern practice. "

Cavechic presents Beware of wolves posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "Not every action take for the sake of good health is effective. Laws were passed in New York recently that are completely ineffective. A smoke and mirrors attempt to pretend to care about the health of Americans. "

Cavechic presents Kraut 2.0 posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "My first batch of sauerkraut did not turn out. Find out why it failed and alternatives for those who do not wish to make their own. "

Alison Pierce presents Lyon-Style Chicken with Vinegar Sauce posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "A Paleo recipe that builds pan sauce prowess -- a classic culinary technique used in restaurants the world over but in too few home kitchens."

Alison Pierce presents Episode 9 - Mount Vernon Farm posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "This video episode takes you to Sperryville, Virginia, to see black Angus cows, Tamworth pigs, and laying hens up close and personal. Learn about a modern farmer's journey from chef to steward of land & livestock."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

late summer greens sauté

By Julie

I get so excited when I see big, gorgeous bunches of crisp local greens for sale at my grocery store. Despite my best intentions to stick to my grocery list, I usually ignore the quantity "1" next to "bunch of greens" and start piling an assortment into the cart. Turnip, mustard, collards, kale, swiss chard, spinach... I just love them all! What I don't love? Preparing them to cook. I dread it. So each night I open the fridge door and see them all in there becoming sadder with each passing day.
I saw this little recipe and it gave me just enough motivation to break out all of my colanders, bowls, and the world's largest sauté pan. I typically don't do too much to my greens when I cook them. Just a little salt, pepper, and oil is all I really require, or a little citrus. Seeing apple cider vinegar, shallots, and crushed red pepper was just the little extra addition to my simple greens that was needed to spur me into action. I mean, it's now officially fall! I made winter squash! So cider vinegar and shallots are totally in order.
Do you chop up stems when you make greens? You should! I know, it's yet another annoying step to preparing them, but you get so much more bang for your buck. Plus, they taste good and add a little textural difference. If you're making rainbow chard, they look pretty too. As for which greens to use in this recipe, I think it's kinda nice to use two different bunches. I used kale and spinach, so two mild ones. Next time I might try using a bitter green and chard. It doesn't really matter, they all have their differences but will all work with the simple ingredients in this recipe. 
The addition of butter is really pretty awesome at the end here. I guess that's a stupid statement. If you're looking for something to serve this with, it's pretty versatile. Something easy (since you'll be sick of washing, stemming, chopping, ripping) like a pork chop, or fancier like meat loaf. Is meat loaf fancy? I think it's kind of a reject valium-laced-1950s-mom dish, but whenever I make it it's consistently like the greatest thing I've ever eaten. I'll put the recipe up some time this winter I predict. It's a hunk of bacon and beef and pork and dates and carrots and celery and onions. I love it.

late-summer greens sauté 
adapted from Bon Appétit

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 thinly sliced shallots, about 1 cup
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 large bunches of greens (I used kale and spinach), stems removed and thinly chopped, leaves torn
2-4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
coarse sea salt, freshly ground pepper

1. Heat oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add shallots and garlic. Cook, stirring often, until they're softened, about 5 minutes.

2. Add red pepper flakes and stir for about 1 minute.

3. Dump in your chopped stems and cook for about 6 - 7 minutes.

4. Add leaves, in large handfuls if they won't all fit at once. Stir around until they're just wilted, about 5 minutes.

5. Stir in vinegar. Start with a small amount and increase if desired. You'll kick yourself if you over-vinegar right off the bat.

6. Add butter and stir around to melt it. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Oh yum. Now it's time to go out and buy more large quantities of greens, because this will be gone in one fell swoop.

This was originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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Tuesday, June 05, 2012

Soft Scrambled Eggs

By Diana Hsieh

I love sous vide scrambled eggs, but they're a bit of a bother to make. Today, however, I tried these slow-cooked scrambled eggs by Gordon Ramsey:



They're really easy to make, and the result is about as close to sous vide scrambled eggs as possible. Since dairy and I are enemies right now, I made them using ghee, and I omitted the glob of whatever-dairy-that-was at the end. I used truffle salt, which is pure awesome on scrambled eggs. Also, I made them in a regular pan (i.e. not non-stick), and that worked okay. Obviously, I recommend omitting the toast.

Read more...

Sunday, June 03, 2012

Institute for Justice Fights for Free Speech Rights of Paleo Blogger

By Diana Hsieh

Recently, I learned that the Institute for Justice (IJ) has taken the case of paleo blogger Steve Cooksey. He's in trouble with North Carolina regulators who wish to suppress his freedom of speech. I couldn't be more delighted, as the case combines two of my great loves: paleo and free speech.

IJ made an awesome video summarizing the case:



For more information on the case, see this page. The press release says:

Can the government throw you in jail for offering advice on the Internet about what people should buy at the grocery store?

That is exactly the claim made by the North Carolina Board of Dietetics/Nutrition. And that is why today diabetic blogger Steve Cooksey of Stanley, N.C. has teamed up with the Institute for Justice (IJ) to file a major First Amendment lawsuit against the State Board in federal court.

In December 2011, Steve Cooksey started a Dear Abby-style advice column on his blog to answer reader questions. In January 2012, the North Carolina Board of Dietetics/Nutrition informed Steve that he could not give readers personal advice on diet, whether for free or for compensation, because doing so constituted the unlicensed, and thus criminal, practice of dietetics.

The State Board also told Steve that his private emails and telephone calls with friends and readers were illegal. The Board also ordered him to shut down his life-coaching service. Violating the North Carolina licensing law can lead to fines, court orders to be silent and even jail.

"You don't need the government's permission to give someone ordinary advice," said IJ Senior Attorney Jeff Rowes. "North Carolina cannot require Steve to be a state-licensed dietitian any more than it can require Dear Abbey to be a state-licensed psychologist."

This lawsuit seeks to answer one of the most important unresolved questions in First Amendment law: When does the government's power to license occupations trump free speech?

"Advice is protected speech," said IJ attorney Paul Sherman. "Just because the government can license certain types of expert professional advice doesn't mean the government can license every type of advice."

Steve Cooksey began offering dietary advice because he is concerned about America's diabetes epidemic. Over 25 million Americans have diabetes, including approximately 800,000 in North Carolina. The human and financial toll is staggering. Diabetes is now a leading cause of stroke, blindness, kidney failure requiring transplantation, and amputation. Because diabetes is a condition of elevated blood sugar, Steve advocates eating foods that keep blood sugar low.

After being diagnosed with Type II diabetes, Steve did research and learned that the high-carb/low-fat diet his doctors recommended to him may not be best for diabetics because carbohydrates raise blood sugar. He adopted the low-carb "Paleolithic" diet of our Stone Age ancestors: fresh veggies, meats, eggs and fish, but no sugars, processed foods or agricultural starches.

Steve lost 78 pounds, freed himself of drugs and doctors, normalized his blood sugar and feels healthier than ever. He believes a low-carb diet is the simplest, cheapest and most effective way to treat diabetes. This goes against the conventional wisdom promoted by licensed dietitians, which advocate a high-carb diet and drugs to lower blood sugar.

"Diabetics need access to information from all points of view, including those that challenge the conventional wisdom," said IJ client Steve Cooksey. "We cannot let government licensing boards censor the Internet and chill our speech."

For more on today's lawsuit, visit www.ij.org/PaleoSpeech. Founded in 1991, the Virginia-based Institute for Justice is a national public interest law firm that fights for free speech and economic liberty nationwide.
This case has huge implications for every advocate of paleo and other non-standard diets. Yet the principle is broader: every person has a right to express and advocate his own views, even when that person is not licensed by the state.

If you want to contribute to Steve's fight against these government censors, please support the Institute for Justice by a donation!

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Saturday, June 02, 2012

Philosophy Weekend: Q&A Radio Preview

By Diana Hsieh

In my live Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio on Sunday morning, I'll answer questions on responding to irrational discussion tactics, what to do if ObamaCare is upheld, taking criticism well, United States as a Christian nation, and more. Join us for this lively hour of applying rational principles to the challenges of real life, where you can share your thoughts and ask questions in the text chat!

  • What: Live Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio

  • Who: Diana Hsieh (Ph.D, Philosophy) and Greg Perkins

  • When: Sunday, 3 June 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET

  • Where: www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live
This week's questions are:
  • Question 1: Responding to Irrational Discussion Tactics: How should a person respond to another's irrational discussion tactics? What should one do when engaged in an intellectual conversation with someone where you're trying to advance your ideas, but the other person has irrational, or even outright dishonest conversation techniques? Such techniques include frequent interruption, talking over you, giving arbitrary time limits for answers before arbitrarily ending the conversation or moving on, and so forth. All of these tactics make it difficult to fully explicate your position or even get full sentences out. In a one-on-one, unobserved conversation, I know it's obvious that one should simply not deal with this person, for they're obviously not listening if they utilize these habits so regularly and frequently. So my main concern is in those cases when you happen to be talking to an irrational conversationalist where other people are observing, such as in a classroom or meeting where you might want to continue the conversation in hopes of reaching the audience instead. In such cases, what should one do?

  • Question 2: What To Do If ObamaCare Is Upheld: What should we do if the Supreme Court upholds ObamaCare? The Supreme Court of the United States will be determining the constitutionality of ObamaCare in a matter of weeks. While it is likely that at least part of it will be struck down, the court might uphold some or all of it. If that happens, what should liberty-loving Americans do? Would we have any recourse? Would it be time to break out the pitchforks and torches?

  • Question 3: Taking Criticism Well: How can a person learn to take criticism well? Some people don't take kindly to criticism, even if offered in a benevolent and constructive way. Why are some people intolerant of criticism? Why is that a problem? How can such people learn to take criticism better? How can others deal with someone overly sensitive to criticism without compromise or dishonesty?

  • Question 4: United States as a Christian Nation: Is the United States a Christian nation? People often claim that the United States is "a Christian nation." What do people mean by that? Why does it matter? Is it true or not?
After answering those questions, I'll answer a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you attend live, you can share your thoughts and ask questions in the text chat. If you miss the live broadcast, you'll find the audio recording of the whole episode, as well as individual questions, posted to the episode's archive page: Q&A Radio: 3 June 2012.

Also, don't forget to Connect with Us via social media, e-mail, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Show Archives, where you can listen to the audio from whole episodes or just selected questions. And visit to the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming broadcasts.

I hope to see you in the chat on Sunday morning!

Read more...

Friday, June 01, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #113

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Jedha presents Buy Paleo Foods Online #1 posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach, saying, "Each week I'll highlight an online store to help provide resources for people. I'll be helping to save people time by providing lists to all their paleo foods. "

Fatisfied presents Giving It Up (a copy of Sweet Potato Power) For Your Love... posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "Sharing your love of sweetpotatoes could win you a copy of Ashley Tudor's new book... plus the nesting of sweetpotato slips, grilled sweetpotato planks, and sweetpotato soap!"

Alison Pierce presents The Chorizo Torpedo posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "Was feeling a little feisty the other morning, contemplating wrapping chorizo in bacon... and ended up with a final product we dubbed The Chorizo Torpedo. With photos and step-by-step instructions!"

Alison Pierce presents Episode 8 - Slow-Cooked Pork Roast with Apples & Onions posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "This recipe gets dinner prepped and slow-cookin' in less than five minutes. It utilizes a less-expensive cut of pork for tons of flavor and leftovers without breaking the bank."

Health Freak Eddy presents No Carbs After 6 Nonsense posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "Yes it can work, but is there a better method?"

Miki Ben-Dor presents Why we gain weight and how to loose weight - the evolutionary answer posted at Paleo Style, saying, "Our body may be smarter than we think, Understanding on the deepest level why body weight changes and how to better control weight the way evolution intended. "

Neely Quinn presents Are Coconut Oil, Saturated Fat, and Cholesterol Really Ok? posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "Still wondering if all that saturated fat and cholesterol are going to clog your arteries? "

MeJane (Susan Holland) presents The Un-hunter Syndrome posted at Weightless in Water/ Paleo, saying, "As a Paleo greenhorn I ran into an "issue" that I talk about for any others who want a slant on hunting for dinner."

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents Sugar Addiction - Top of the Most Wanted List posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "We provide you with a wealth of information detailing all the ill effects of sugar and sugar substitutes."

Amy Kubal presents No Whey!! 'Powder-Free', Convenient Post Workout Fuel Options posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "100% "Powder-Free" Post Workout Fuel - no shaker bottle required!"

Nell Stephenson presents Chick'n Fillets, Tofurky and a Cheese Style Wedge posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Fake Vegan Meats...All wrong!"

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #39: Adrenal Fatigue Part 2 posted at Balanced Bites, saying, "Diane and Liz Discuss many questions surrounding Adrenal Fatigue."

Joe Lindley presents The Skinny on Obesity (Extra): Four Sweet Tips from Dr. Lustig - UCTV posted at Craving Sugar News, saying, "Dr. Lustig offers some frank and practical tips on on how to avoid sweets in this extra video he added to his 7-video series, The Skinny on Obesity by the University of California TV channel. It is well worth your time - not only for the value of the tips, but for the tone of his delivery."

Lea @ PaleoSpirit presents Paleo and the City: Greensquare Tavern posted at Paleo Spirit, saying, "Paleo dining in New York City: Review of Paleo-friendly, "farm to table" restaurant Greensquare Tavern in the Flatiron District."

Peggy Emch presents Could You Really Live the Primal Life? posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "How happy would I be without mounds of paper to write on and stacks of books to read? How free would I feel without my piano to pour my soul into? How would I feel if I never read another theorem and couldn't keep up on the direction mathematics takes? How Primal am I really?"

The Lazy Caveman presents When Paleo Isn't Enough, Part I posted at The Lazy Caveman, saying, "What do you do when your real food diet isn't working for you like it's supposed to?"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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