Monday, April 30, 2012

The Ethics of Eating Meat

By Jeremy Brunson

At the end of March through the beginning of April, The New York Times Magazine put out a call for essays of less than 600 words that were to explain the ethics underlying the use of animals for food by humans.  I sent in a submission, but it was not chosen to be among the finalists.  Viewing them, it is not difficult to understand why--I actually address the source and purpose of ethics and identify what immorality consists of, while the finalists present guilt-riddled, emotionalist autobiographies.

My essay is below.  Though I don't give explicit credit in the essay, my understanding of the role of ethics in man's life was greatly clarified and accelerated by studying and mentally "chewing" the works of Ayn Rand.  (See: "The Objectivist Ethics")

The Ethics of Eating Meat

That some species of animals live by eating other species of animals is evident to any honest person who has spent time observing nature.

Man is also a species of animal, though he is unique in the kingdom.

Like any animal, man is an autonomous organism.  As such, his fundamental goal is to maintain his own existence.  Like those animals that possess it, consciousness is his primary tool, but he is unique in that his is volitional--that is, he possesses free-will.

The manner by which man is to sustain himself does not come to him automatically (by instinct) as it does for other species. Man must discover how to achieve his survival, painstakingly and projected over the course of a life-time, by using his faculty of reason to identify the facts of reality, to evaluate them as beneficial or detrimental, and to act accordingly. Formalized, this process is the science of ethics.

From an objective morality, the notion of "inter-species justice"--that it is unjust for one species (homo sapiens in particular) to destroy another species in the kingdom--as suggested in the article announcing this competition, confuses the purpose of the virtue of justice.  An act of justice applies to a man granting sanction or condemnation for the ideas and actions of other moral actors, i.e. of other rational beings, i.e. of other men.

This is not to say, however, that man cannot be immoral when acting to consume lower, non-rational animals as food.

He could display immorality as follows:
  • Suppose the field of biology discovers evidence that meat seriously thwarts his health, or he has a known medical condition that precludes him eating meat, or he learns that a recently purchased meat product is tainted or improperly prepared--to consume meat then, he must forgo the virtue of honesty by the vice of ignoring pertinent facts.
  • Or, suppose that he steals another man's steak, or he demands that others should give him steak or subsidize his farm by force of government because he is unwilling or unable to do so on his own and, besides, he or the "public" needs it--here, he eschews the virtue of productiveness by attempting to escape that effort by violating the rights of other men through initiating force against them.
  • Or, suppose he is a farmer who feeds his livestock biologically unsuitable material, keeps them confined to disease-ridden pens, thereby committing them to endless suffering until their slaughter--in doing this, he flouts the virtue of integrity for the depravity of condemning life as such to utter misery.
  • Or, suppose that he knows of the joy and invigoration that meat consumption brings him (the sensual pleasure, the physical vitality, and the mental clarity) yet he turns away from it for precisely these reasons--doing so, he rejects the virtue of pride for the sin of sacrificing the good for being good.
(These are a meager few of infinite possibilities, of course, and each scenario mentioned above likely involves rejecting additional virtues, too.)

In short, man's primary vice is to willfully evade reality. To determine whether he acts viciously regarding meat requires a great deal of knowledge about the context of his action: his character, his tastes and why he holds them (from reason? from authority? from whim?), the extent of his knowledge, his health, his environment, etc.

Broadly speaking in summary, raising or hunting animals for the purpose of eating their flesh can be a perfectly moral activity--as moral as any other activity man might undertake in pursuit of his life, health, and happiness.
(This was originally posted at my blog.)

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Saturday, April 28, 2012

Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

In my live Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday morning, I'll answer questions on the wrong of utilitarianism, the morality of government jobs, planning in advance, padding your resumé, and more. As always, it's on Sunday, 29 April 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live. Please join us for this hour of lively discussion, where we apply rational principles to the challenges of living virtuous, happy, and free lives!

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: The Wrong of Utilitarianism: What's wrong with utilitarianism? The basic principle of utilitarianism is "the greatest happiness for the greatest number." What's wrong with that as a moral standard? Should't a person act for the good of society?

  • Question 2: The Morality of Government Jobs: Is it moral to work for the IRS? Is it morally wrong to work for government agencies like the IRS (or equivalent tax bureaus), IAS (Indian Administrative Services), or the EPA? I'm an advocate of free markets. Would I be a hypocrite to work for such illegitimate government agencies?

  • Question 3: Planning in Advance: How much advance planning is optimal? Some people like to plan everything well in advance, while others prefer to allow events to unfold and make decisions on the fly. Is one approach better than the other? How much does it depend on the circumstances? How can people with difference preferences coordinate comfortably?

  • Question 4: Padding Your Resumé: Is doing activities just to pad your resume dishonest? Some people work on mastering playing the violin, competing in tennis tournaments, learning calculus, and other activities – not because they have any interest in them or because they think they might develop an interest once tried, but rather because they think these activities will look good on an application or resumé. Is that dishonest? Is it unwise?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you can't attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as audio-only podcasts by subscribing to our RSS Feeds. You can also listen to full episodes or just selected questions from any past episode in the Webcast Archive, including questions on paleo, nutrition, and health. Finally, don't forget to submit and vote on the questions that you'd most like me to answer from the ongoing Question Queue.

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Video: Poking Fun at Friends' Ideas Online

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Philosophy in Action Webcast, I discussed poking fun at friends' ideas online. The question was:

Is poking fun at people's ideas on social media rude, offensive, or otherwise wrong? For example, is it proper to make jokes about Jesus, Obama, or environmentalism on Facebook - knowing that some of your Facebook friends are Christians, Democrats, or environmentalists? Should those people be offended? Should a person limit himself to serious arguments?
My answer, in brief:
Facebook and other online media are like a large cocktail party with everyone talking. Don't rush around seeking out conflict, but rather seek out positive values.
Here's the video of my full answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends via social media, forums, and e-mail! You can also throw a bit of extra love in our tip jar.

Join the next Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live.

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, e-mail, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Webcast Archives, where you can listen to the full webcast or just selected questions from any past episode, and our my YouTube channel. And go to the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming webcast episodes.

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Friday, April 27, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #108

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Melissa Joulwan presents Costa Rican Ceviche posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "I learned how to make ceviche from a Nicaraguan chef during our recent trip to Costa Rica. It's the perfect summer dish!"

Crystal Meadows presents Life: Unplugged. posted at Against the Grain, saying, "A 21-Day Sugar and Media Detox. Try it for yourself sometime!"

Joe Lindley presents The Skinny on Obesity Episode 2: Sickeningly Sweet posted at Craving Sugar, saying, "This is the 2nd video in the Skinny on Obesity series developed by the University of California TV channel (UCTV). In this episode, Dr. Robert Lustig, Pediatric Endochrinologist – University of California, San Francisco, and Elissa Epel, Center for Obesity Assessment, Study, and Treatment – University of California, express their concerns about the unique and devastating impact of sugar."

Miki Ben-Dor presents Physicist Richard Feynman on the “science” of nutrition posted at Paleo Style, saying, "Last year I attended a lecture by Professor Joanne Slavin, the chairwoman of the “carbohydrates and proteins” section of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. She admitted that there was no scientific justification whatsoever for the committee recommendations. Feynman knew it 20 years ago..."

John A. Heatherly presents When Barefoot Running Was A Necessity posted at The Blog of Author John A. Heatherly, saying, "Please enjoy this Excerpt and Reference material from THE CAVE AND THE SEA, A NOVEL!"

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Angel's Perfectly Poached Eggs posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Angel's perfectly poached eggs are a staple food in our home. We eat them for breakfast, or use them to top asparagus and steaks. This recipe is great because it makes perfect eggs every time. No more guessing about timing...so you can concentrate your efforts on enjoying your meal!"

Amy Kubal presents The "Additive Effect": Artificial is NOT Intelligent posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "The not so sweet truth about artificial sweeteners - from Sweet N' Low to Stevia."

Kristjan presents Why is Wheat Bad For You? The Bitter Truth Revealed posted at Kris Kris, saying, "Why is wheat bad for you? This article explains the bitter truth about how wheat may damage your intestine, harm your cholesterol and make you fat."

Riki Shore presents Porterhouse Steak posted at Three Squares, saying, "Nothing's easier than steak for a quick and flavorful midweek meal. This cooking method is foolproof - producing delicious results every time."

Ana J presents Eating out to lower your cholesterol posted at Whole Life Diets, saying, "Eating out Paleo at popular restaurants and also to lower your cholesterol."

Jedha presents Nuts & Paleo. How Much Can You Eat? posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach.

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents The History of Broccoli posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "The history of broccoli is as rich as it’s deep green color. Evolving from a wild cabbage, broccoli’s origin dates back thousands of years."

Fatisfied presents Rabbit Habit posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "Crockpot Roasted Rabbit... with current trending toward local, unprocessed, and sustainable food, eating a rabbit might become a..."

Peggy Emch presents Which Fats to Eat, How, and Why, and How to Buy Olive Oil posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "My brother kept telling his friend not to heat peanut oil so hot for cooking but his friend didn't believe him since the only reason he could give was, "because my sister said so." So he asked me for the straight dope. This week's post is our conversation about it."

Sean Booth presents Diet Tweaks or Eating Disorder? posted at Old Fashioned Upgrades, saying, "At what point does changing your diet become unhealthy? Is there such a thing as tweaking too much?"

Nell Stephenson presents Food and Politics posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson.

Penny McIntosh presents The Poison in Peanuts posted at Health Coach Penny, saying, "A friend of mine in Georgia, who leases his land to a peanut farmer, noticed the farmer was burning something at the end of each row he planted. It was the empty bags of peanut seeds. My friend was able to salvage a label from the ashes and emailed it to me. Shocking."

Neely Quinn presents Homemade Sweet Potato "Chips" posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "Neely's favorite carb-a-licious snack recipe."

Suz Crawt presents Paleo Meets Vegan posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "What happens when you meet some Vegans on a Paleo conference..."

Chris Tamme presents I Have a Crush on Weston A. Price posted at Primal Roar, saying, "My take on Weston A. Price and his book "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration". Also my results after 6 months of supplementation with FCLO and HVBO."

Alison Pierce presents Episode 7 - Meat Sauce posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "How to put together an easy meat sauce, then pair it with roasted spaghetti squash or layer it into a gluten-free, Paleo-friendly eggplant lasagna. Alison also discusses doubling or tripling this benchmark recipe and freezing for later use."

Arsy presents Pork Chops w/ Spiced-Rhubarb Chutney posted at Rubies & Radishes.

Paul Jaminet presents Are Low Doses of Niacin Dangerous? posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post is the second in a series looking at whether fortification of food with micronutrients (folic acid, niacin, iron) has been harmful."

Laurie Donaldson presents GF Chocolate Chip Cookies That Don't Taste Like Crap posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Self-explanatory title :P"

Lea @PaleoSpirit presents The Hunger Games Lamb Stew with Dried Plums posted at Paleo Spirit, saying, "Paleo Lamb Stew with Dried Plums recipe based on the dish described in the book "The Hunger Games"."

The Cavechic presents A crazy week posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "Lactic fermented foods...the, 'new' super food?!"

Douglas Robb presents Paleo Dessert Recipes – Vol. 1 posted at Health Habits, saying, "For all you Paleos with a sweet tooth"

Tony Federico presents US Wellness Meats $100 Giftcard Giveaway posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "What does living "primally" mean to you? Share your thoughts and you'll be entered to win a US Wellness Meats giftcard along with some other sweet Primal schwag!"

Health Freak Eddy presents Nutritious Chocolate Cake: 2 ingredients, 5 minutes posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "I know I rarely do recipes, and Im certainly no fan of cheating your way through paleo with dessert alternatives, but I had to share this simple and delicious innovation which I enjoy from time to time."

Cavegirl Stephanie presents Health Stuff - What's the Scoop? posted at Northwest Cavegirls, saying, "Cavegirl Stephanie discusses her take on a few popular Paleo reads including those written by Gary Taubs, Sean Croxton, and Stephen Guyenet. She also does a Round-up and discussion of a few articles on Paleo Body Image starting with PaleoParent's recent post on "The Fattest People in Paleo" (who we love, by the way!)."

Angie presents Great Wolf Lodge - Paleo Style posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying, "Angie gives us a rundown on her recent family vacation to Great Wolf Lodge including how to eat and exercize paleo-style while on vacation."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Healing from Injury

By Diana Hsieh

Broken Arm

The Modern Paleo Question of the Week is:
Have you injured yourself since eating paleo? What did you injure? How did you do it? Also, what did you do to recover more quickly and fully?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Thursday, April 26, 2012

How to Peel an Apple Like a Boss

By Diana Hsieh

This video makes me want to work on my knife skills!

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Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Chocolate Review: Divine's 70% Mint

By Benjamin Skipper

Time for another foray with my favorite class of herbs, mint. As you might know, mint chocolate is positively one of my favorite foods period, and in assessing companies I am always naturally tempted to select their mint offering. At my nearest World Market I got my hands on Divine's 70% mint dark chocolate. Admittedly I am not particularly enthused by this company, but mint is mint.

The thing that strikes me as odd is that they didn't advertise, at least on my package, that they added crystallized, minted sugar for a more crispy texture, as that seems it would be an important facet to note about the bar. I was surprised to come across the snowflake-like bits in the gradient after wondering what the crunch was all about. But anyhow, the bar is only mildly minty with an unpleasant bitter grassy theme, with the chocolate being virtually undetectable. The grassy notes are not at all tasty like New Tree's, making me feel as if I had eaten some from the yard. The bar smells of mint and grass, and looks dusty, smeared, and even has scratches on the back, though snaps with a sturdy sound. The melt is just okay, as it seems to be predominantly crunchy with some crystal-like crisp from the sugar clumps.

I deplore those angled lines used as the decoration. Why bother if so little effort is to be exerted? At least I really enjoyed the gold wrapper: It reminds me so much of wealth, money, and the good things in life. The cloth-like texture almost makes me want to keep it.

I leave disappointed. It's not all that minty, the grass is yucky, and the chocolate just isn't there. It seems to be a continuing problem with mint chocolates in that they're either not minty enough, have terrible additional attributes (like the rye taste in Theo's), or overwhelm the chocolate. To date I maintain the opinion that Endangered Species offers the best mint bar out there, with the mint being of just the right intensity, in perfect balance and harmony to a chocolate that can hold its own. In second place I would suggest New Tree's 73% mint, for while the mint is milder it does have a delicious grassy tone, and the green tea extract never fails to make my head feel all cool inside, my favorite aftereffect to a mint experience. This Divine bar just doesn't do well, so don't seek mint fulfillment here.

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Sunday, April 22, 2012

Hsieh PJM OpEd: Free Market Lessons from Contraception Fight

By Paul Hsieh

PJMedia has published my latest piece, "Free Market Lessons from Contraception Fight".

I discuss how the controversy over contraception coverage has made apparent three lessons about America’s current health care system and why we need free-market health care reforms:

1) Health insurance should be uncoupled from employment.
2) Mandated benefits will become political footballs.
3) We must fight for freedom as a principle.
For more details on each of these three points, read the full piece.

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Saturday, April 21, 2012

Videos: The Morality of Breaking the Law and Vigilantism

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Philosophy in Action Webcast, I discussed the morality of breaking the law and vigilantism in two questions. The first question was:

When is it moral to break the law? Laws should be written to protect individual rights. Unfortunately, many laws today violate rights. When should I abide by a rights-violating law, and when is it proper to break it?
My answer, in brief:
A person does not have any moral obligation to submit to violations of his rights. However, the proper course – whether complying with the law, breaking the law overtly, or breaking the law covertly – depends on the particulars of the situation. Mostly, get legal advice first!
Here's the video of my full answer:
The second question was:
Where is the line between justice and vigilantism? When is it moral to take the law into your own hands – meaning pursuing, detaining, and/or punishing criminals as a private citizen? Suppose that you know – without a shadow of a doubt – that some person committed a serious crime against you or a loved one. If the justice system cannot punish the person due to some technicality, is it wrong for you to do so? If you're caught, should a judge or jury punish you, as if you'd committed a crime against an innocent person?
My answer, in brief:
The vigilante is not an agent of justice, but a threat to innocents and to the foundations of civilized society.
Here's the video of my full answer:
If you enjoy these videos, please "like" them on YouTube and share then with friends via social media, forums, and e-mail! You can also throw a bit of extra love in our tip jar.

Join the next Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live.

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, e-mail, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Webcast Archives, where you can listen to the full webcast or just selected questions from any past episode, and our my YouTube channel. And go to the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming webcast episodes.

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Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post a link to The Objectivist Roundup. The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

Erosophia hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

Also, in my live Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday morning, I'll answer questions on responsibility, obligation, and duty, stockpiling medication, poking fun at others' ideas, encouraging friends to be more purposeful, and more. As always, it's on Sunday, 22 April 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live. Please join us for this hour of lively discussion, where we apply rational principles to the challenges of living virtuous, happy, and free lives!

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: Responsibility, Obligation, and Duty: What is the difference between responsibility, obligation, and duty? Often, people use these terms interchangeably. What's difference between them, if any?

  • Question 2: Stockpiling Medication: Is it wrong to stockpile medication now in the event of an economic crash in the future? We are concerned that increasing economic troubles will raise the prices of some prescription and over-the-counter medications, and make them hard to find in the future. Is it okay to start a stockpile of some medications (most of which have a long shelf-life)? In the case of prescription medications, is it okay to exaggerate to our doctors or play "musical pharmacies" in order to obtain more medication?

  • Question 3: Poking Fun at Others' Ideas: Is indirectly poking fun at a person's ideas rude or otherwise wrong? Is posting jokes, pictures, articles, or expressing views that might offend others – including friends and family – rude, offensive, or just in bad taste? For example, is it proper to make jokes about Jesus, Obama, or environmentalism on Facebook – knowing that some of your Facebook friends are Christians, Democrats, or environmentalists? Should a person limit himself to serious arguments?

  • Question 4: Encouraging Friends to Be More Purposeful: How can I encourage my friends to be more purposeful and passionate? I have been certain about my life's purpose – in terms of what career and personal creative works I'd like to pursue – from a young age. I've had friends who are above-average in their academic and career work, and who explore various hobbies, but they do not pursue those activities with eager passion. They say that "do not know what they want out of life" and have not "found their calling." What is at the root of uncertainty about one's purpose? Is there a moral breach involved? How can I motivate, encourage, and inspire my friends?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you can't attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as audio-only podcasts by subscribing to our RSS Feeds. You can also listen to full episodes or just selected questions from any past episode in the Webcast Archive, including questions on paleo, nutrition, and health. Finally, don't forget to submit and vote on the questions that you'd most like me to answer from the ongoing Question Queue.

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Friday, April 20, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #107

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Diana Hsieh presents The Battle of the Bulge posted at NoodleFood, saying, "Watch a hysterical video on a 1940's fitness craze for women -- and then read two great posts on women and body fat."

Joe Lindley presents The Skinny on Obesity Episode 1: An Epidemic for Every Body posted at Craving Sugar, saying, "Millions watched Dr. Robert Lustig’s Interviews on CBS, ABC, and Fox TV about Sugar and how it poses a serious risk to our health. This topic is rapidly gaining attention, as it should. Sugar is toxic. Millions are Craving Sugar every day – asking why and what to do about it. The University of California has taken a significant step forward by preparing a 7-part video series on this issue to explain it fully for the American public and the world."

Nancy Atwell presents Hands-On Eating: The Importance of Finger Food posted at Eating Modern Foods with an Ancestral View, saying, "The tactile enjoyment of eating with your hands may be one element of food binges/snacking."

Ana J presents How to actually lower your cholesterol posted at Whole Life Diets, saying, "New ebook about how to lower your cholesterol in just a few short weeks using the Paleo diet!"

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Sweet Grilled Pineapple with Puerto Rican Rum posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "The weather is getting warmer and its time to start thinking of standing out from the crowd at your next backyard BBQ. This recipe for Sweet Grilled Pineapple is just perfect for summer get togethers and beach days! The coconut crystals and cachaca (Puerto Rican Rum) put an instant caramelization on the fruit, and the coconut water fills it with electrolytes, which is perfect for those sunny days!"

Jedha presents Paleo Is Not About 6 Pack Abs Or The Tightest Ar**! posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach, saying, "This article was inspired after reading the story of the Paleo Parents receiving criticism even though Stacy has lost 135 pounds. We all need a reminder that paleo is not just about who has the best body, it's a bout much more than that! "

Nell Stephenson presents Not Craving Anything posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "When followed correctly, there is no craving anything on Paleo!"

Kristjan presents 13 Ways Coffee Can Improve Your Health posted at Kris Kris, saying, "Despite what you may have heard in the past, coffee consumption has a wide range of health benefits. Here are 13 ways it can improve your health."

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents Low Mercury Fish – Which Fish Are Safe For Consumption posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "We clear the murky watery debate with detailed information on low mercury fish. Which fish should be eaten and which fish one should look to avoid."

Health Freak Eddy presents The 5 Reasons We Are Fat posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "We have all read a lot and learnt as we become more involved in the paleo lifestyle. There are some key reasons out there especially within paleo circles to suggest why the health of the population is so bad. When people ask what the biggest problems are, these are my 5. Do you agree?"

Alison Pierce presents Episode 6 - Green Beans Three Ways posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "We show you three quick & easy ways to tackle vegetables on a busy night: roasting (Bacon-Roasted Green Beans), steaming (Asian-Style Green Beans), and blanching (Green Beans with Lemon-Shallot Compound Butter)."

Tony Federico presents Primal Chefs - Making the Case for a Cooked Ancestral Diet posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "While we often discuss the merits of "man the hunter" vs "man the gatherer", perhaps we should be exploring "man the cook" instead. "

Neely Quinn presents Intermittent Fasting Part 1: Why? posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "Max Shippee of CrossFit 1440 discusses why you'd want to use intermittent fasting to lose weight, lean out, increase your insulin sensitivity, and more."

The Lazy Caveman presents In Search of the Perfect Human Diet Review posted at The Lazy Caveman, saying, "I sat down with a plate of ribs and got around to reviewing this film from CJ Hunt. It's a solid film with a lot of Paleo super stars, but should be viewed more as a prequel than a standalone film."

Kelly Bejelly presents Paleo Salmon Cakes posted at A Girl Worth Saving, saying, "An easy, inexpensive salmon cakes recipe."

Crystal Meadows presents Paleo Perplexity posted at Against the Grain, saying, "What's so perplexing about Paleo?"

Angel & Meghan presents Paleo Shrimp and Whitefish Ceviche, A Chilled Snack with Ginger posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This amazing combination of seafood in a perfectly executed vinaigrette will be a delight for the hot summer days to come."

Fatisfied presents Egging You On posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "Continued chronicle of laying at home, the origins of egg consumption, how eggs moderate inflammation, and Peck-a-Page."

Beth Mazur presents Healthy Lifestyle Habits and Mortality in Overweight and Obese Individuals posted at Weight Maven, saying, "a new study links healthy habits and a significant decrease in mortality regardless of BMI."

Meghan Little & Angel Torres presents Paleo Sautéed Zucchini and Summer Squash, A Seasonal Spring Side posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Our paleo sautéed zucchini and summer squash, a seasonal spring side, is made with dairy-free and grain-free ingredients. Try with our BBQ chicken or classic rib eye steak, you can't go wrong!"

Brittney Beckham presents Motivational Monday posted at Journey to a Healthier Lifestyle, saying, "This is just one of my posts in my Motivational Monday series! It's about excuses."

Stephanie presents Whole Chicken in the Crockpot posted at Northwest Cavegirls, saying, "Cavegirl Stephanie discovers cooking a chicken WHOLE in the crockpot and shares what you can do with said chicken."

Peggy Emch presents My Dad Died of Alzheimer's Last Week and It Wasn't My Business to Save Him posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "While we see people around us suffering, sometimes we have to realize that we cannot help. Some people want to change their diets and some just don't. I always thought I could have helped my dad but it just wasn't my place."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: CSA

By Diana Hsieh

CSA Haul 2/18

The Modern Paleo Question of the Week is:
Have you ever subscribed to a CSA? If so, would you recommend it to others or not?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Wednesday, April 18, 2012

microgreens salad with garlic mustard vinaigrette

By Julie

Every year I get so into spring. Like, so freaking motivated. Maybe even more motivated than I was in January to erase the disgusting damage I did by shoveling handfuls of Christmas cookies in my mouth two times a day (maybe three, I'm sure there were breakfast cookies in there somewhere). But motivated in a different way - motivated in a productive, gorgeous-weather-induced energized kind of way. I suppose spring cleaning is a cultural emblem of the season for a reason. So, there's a raised bed vegetable garden in the works (despite my decision to forgo it last year) and I have grand visions of growing rows and rows of lovely vegetables. In reality, I'll probably kill them all. I hate Denver.
Microgreens are so trendy. I'm embarrassed to post about them. I promise I won't post about them when my garden is full of them. Even if that's probably as far as my veggies will grow since they'll soon after wither away for lack of water and blaringly awful sun. Sometimes I like trendy things, though. I wish I could prove that I was into them before they were trendy, but I can't always. DAMMIT. In any case, I love little microgreens - the little baby plants that are so wonderfully peppery and bite-y. This cute market near my house carries them in big ziplock bags and you can find flowers strewn in them. So perfectly spring. The flowers are both sweet and super spicy. And then putting them in a salad makes you feel like your life will be practically perfect in every way.
So my new job is going pretty well. I'm still glowing from the novelty of benefits after not having really any for a couple years. There's a gym on campus that I'm psyched about and I've somehow gotten three people who want to train under my expert tutelage. Ha. I also get to go on walks - whether it's to various buildings for work purposes, or just to take a break and do a 1.5 mile loop around the campus. Easy to please, I guess. I missed walking so much. I never got to walk in my last job. Except for occasionally when I'd just leave and walk over to the animal shelter across the street. Those were terrible ideas. I almost got a cat every time. THEY NEEDED ME.
While not the most original recipe around, this salad is just kind of an inspiring welcome to spring produce recipe... and, isn't it nice to be reminded of how good salads are? I suppose you could have been eating salads during the winter, but bleh, those don't really count. I hope you can find microgreens around. It's getting a little late for them - I'm struggling to be timely with my blog posts. I'm actually feeling a little overwhelmed with everything that I need and want to do. Like really, majorly overwhelmed. I try to do too much. Sigh.

microgreens salad with garlic mustard vinaigrette

microgreens, from a variety of plants - arugula, mizuna, lettuces, radishes, etc.
romaine or red leaf lettuce
scallions or chives, finely chopped
pecans, roughly chopped
ricotta salata, optional or any other salty cheese you like

dressing
1/4 cup olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons dijon mustard
coarse sea salt and freshly ground pepper

To make the dressing, heat the olive oil over low heat and add the garlic. Cook the garlic for 5 - 7 minutes, until the garlic is very lightly turning brown, but don't over cook it!! Remove from heat and let cool for a bit. Whisk in the mustard and salt and pepper to taste.

Wash and dry microgreens and lettuce (be careful with any flowers!). Rip lettuce into bite sized pieces and rip microgreens in half if they're kind of long.

Toss the greens with the green onions and pecans. Drizzle with dressing and top with some shaved cheese and more coarse sea salt and pepper if you want.

Gorgeous! I hope spring is motivating you to be wonderful!

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Starting Over with CrossFit — Safely

By Trey Peden

I mentioned back in January that I was heading back to CrossFit, but this time at a new gym. There were several reasons I wanted to go to a different gym. 1) My old gym was kind of pricey compared to others I'd found. 2) My old gym is pretty much like working out outside. I have no problem with cold weather, but when it starts getting hot, I start freaking out. I hate hot weather! 3) I wasn't super keen on the coaching style. It was thorough, but I felt a bit stifled.

Anyway, I did get through the new gym's "onramp" program. They knew I'd done CrossFit before, and while my form is just OK, it clearly shows that I've received some good training in the past. So I wasn't surprised to receive a low level of instruction for onramp. When I started back in on the regular classes, I was surprised that the level of coaching was still very low. I couldn't tell if this was out of apathy or ignorance, but I saw some people doing lifts in a way that, frankly, scared me. I made a point of practicing my Burgener Warm-Ups on my own, but there really isn't a lot you can do on your own if you're just a beginner weight lifter like me. I knew it was risky, but I figured I would stick with this gym for a little while and re-evaluate.

Well, I managed to convince my boyfriend that he should try CrossFit and so he signed up for the onramp classes at that same gym. Unfortunately, they "flunked" him. (!!!) When I asked him to tell me what all he did in his classes he described the same basic things that I did, which means he received little to no actual instruction on proper form and movement. This shocked me and explained a lot. At least they had the good sense to express some concern about his ability to participate in the full CrossFit classes without correcting some of his movements, but they wanted to charge him extra to make up for their lack of ability to instruct him or outline a means of progressing toward the proper form.

So, I told him about my old gym and we decided to head over to check it out. They invite everyone to observe a class, ask lots of questions, and get a clear sense of how things work before you sign up for classes.

I was pleasantly surprised. First of all, the gym has grown quite a bit over the last year. The owners work really hard to make it a good gym, so it is good to see them succeed even if I didn't think it worked well for me initially. Second, they changed some of their approaches to the training and re-worked the method a little bit in a way that -- although their previous approach did not disagree with me -- I think will be very good. They've changed their pricing and now there are more options, flexibility, and it's even cheaper for the BF and I to go together. I've also learned that I prefer to work out in the morning, which kind of changes things in a number of ways I don't care to get into here.

Monday night, we started their beginners class and it was AMAZING.

I have to say: having good coaches and instructors for weight training makes a huge difference. Total game changer. And at my new old CrossFit gym, they are top-notch, can't-be-beat.

In this one class -- a class I've now taken three times with three separate instructors -- I got some new tips on improving my front and back squats as well as my overhead squat, tips on things I just hadn't learned to focus on before. This morning, I have no unpleasant soreness in my back or knees in spite of having done a zillion squats the other night. (I do have some minor muscle soreness elsewhere, but it's completely manageable.)

So, anyway, I just wanted to say that if you're checking out new CrossFit gyms, you should insist that they let you watch a class so you can gauge the type of coaching and instruction they offer. It will make a huge difference in your safety and fitness!

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Tuesday, April 17, 2012

The Battle of the Bulge

By Diana Hsieh

Clearly, we paleo women need to stop lifting heavy weights and start this 1940's workout routine! (Really, it's hysterical!)



On the plus side -- definitely no pun intended -- these women look so much healthier than today's stick-figure models!

For more on women and weight, I'd recommend reading Why Women Need Fat by Melissa McEwen and I'm OK, You're Fat by Crystal Meadows.

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Monday, April 16, 2012

The One About the CrossFit Open

By Jenn Casey

(Originally posted at my blog Rational Jenn on March 29, 2012.)

Yeah, so, I did the CrossFit Open this year and I am here to tell you all about it.

I am SO happy I did it--for a $20 registration fee, I got a little taste of what CrossFit competition is like, a good sense of what I am truly capable of at this point in my life/CrossFit career, and an overwhelming feeling of camaraderie with the awesome people I was cheering on at my gym and far away (and they cheered me on, too). A bargain for $20.

And I wasn't even going to sign up originally. I knew I'd be doing the Open WODs as part of the Outlaw Way programming that I follow at my gym, so I figured I might as well save my $20. But--and this could just be the way my psychology works--there was something about forking over that money that made it REAL. That made me want to not miss a single Open WOD. I think I tried harder each time, because this was a REAL CrossFit competition, damnit, and I'm nothing if not up for a competition.

And I wasn't alone--many of my fellow gymmates did the Open, too. It was fun to go check out our team scores and know that my efforts contributed to our overall performance. And, like most things CrossFit, it was fun to share our misery and triumphs during the experience. "Couldn't get that 61st snatch on 12.2? Totally understand." And "Did you hear so-and-so PR'd her push press during 12.3? Awesome!"

Really. So. Much. Fun. Way more fun than running a 5K. Even if you do that with friends, it's not the same. They aren't cheering for you along the way as you get to the 150th wall ball, and you aren't encouraging them as you are judging their burpees. And there is certainly a sense of accomplishment at the end of a 5K, and often a t-shirt, but it takes a LOT longer (for me) to finish a 5K, and it's A.) boring old running (or walk-bouncing if I'm going uphill, heh), and B.) that's it. With the Open, there was another WOD to look forward to for FIVE weeks! Yes, I'm aware of how insane that might sound. I'm not hating on all you lovely 5K-10K-MillionK people--if that's what you love, oh, please do it. But I love CrossFit way more than running.

My one reservation about officially signing up for the Open was that it would trigger my Perfectionism Monster. But the Monster must be on vacation, or sufficiently subdued these days. I felt competitive, but not perfectionisty. My whole attitude throughout the whole thing was "Let's see what I can do!" and "I got this." and "Wow, I did better than I thought!" And therefore, the Open experience makes me more confident about trying a local Masters or scaled competition. Because, you know, I got this.

How did I do? You may be interested to learn that I finished in 704th place in the South East region (that's for individual women). I'm not exactly sure how many women competed in my region, but I think I landed solidly in the middle somewhere, maybe last third or something. Which I am THRILLED with.

My scores (for full descriptions of each Open WOD, you can go here and click on the tabs):

12.1 82 burpees in 7 minutes. I kept a nice steady pace and didn't have to stop and rest. I'd done 100 burpees in 8:07 a month before, so 82 was a little short of my goal of 86. I considered redoing this WOD, but decided not to, because I was a bit worried about awakening the Perfectionism Monster (and this was supposed to be fun, after all), and also, frankly, because it's, you know, burpees. Duh.

12.2 60 snatches. Okay, so my 1RM is 90#, so I knew it was pretty unlikely I'd get that 61st snatch. However, I optimistically set out the weights for the 100# snatch in the event I had time to try. And I ALMOST had time to try. I had a good 40 seconds left when I failed the 60th snatch (ARGH!) and had to regroup for about 20 seconds in order to find the strength to get to 60. By then I was out of time to set up for 100 and try for it. SO CLOSE. And I was super proud of my 60.

12.3 200 reps. WAY higher than I thought I could do. Keep in mind, box jumps still freak me out mentally (I did step-downs off the box) and I'd only just gotten real live toes-to-bars the month before. And after all that, it was the push press that slowed me down. Funny, huh? You know there's something crazy when the box jumps are the easiest part of the WOD.

12.4 182 reps. I sighed a little when I saw double-unders finally show up on an Open WOD. It's not that I can't do them, but . . . I really can't quite do them consistently. I've only recently achieved the ability to do one at will on purpose, and have been working on stringing them together, which for me goes like this: single-double-single-single-double-etc. But hey, I figured I'd get at least ONE DU if I had time after the wall balls. And I had about 2.5 minutes after the wall balls (which I got to throw at a 9' target for the first time--I had to actually jump many times!). It was the cheering, and the feeling of competition, and I think I was in the zone, and somehow managed to pull off 32 DUs (and goodness knows how many singles). Lots of people were cheering me (I was the only person in the gym doing the Open and so I had a personal audience) and it was super fun! :D

12.5 5 reps. I knew we'd have pull ups on the Open, and I knew I'd get a low score on that WOD. I only got my first unassisted pull up ever on February 20th, a month ago! But when I saw it was chest-to-bar pull ups?!?!?!? Oh holy cow. My plan was to get my three thrusters and then spend the rest of my 7 minutes trying for a C2B pull up. I wanted to go down swinging, you know? And I managed to get TWO. So my measly 5 on this WOD includes a PR, so I am not at all sad about it. In fact, I'm just tickled!

Here's the thing, they structured these workouts so that the vast majority of participants could accomplish something, even if it was only a few reps. And that was pretty clever, I think. It was a great way to make the competition achievable for the likes of regular people like me, and competitive for those going on to Regionals and the Games (like this guy who was part of Team CrossFit Kennesaw). There was, as it turned out, literally only one skill I would not have been able to pull off had I made it that far in that WOD--a muscle up. But that was buried deep into 12.4. I hope the CrossFit Games peopleguys keep this kind of structure for future Opens, because it would have been no fun at all for most of us to have a WOD begin with muscle ups.

So that was my first Open experience. I am, if you are new to my blog, 41 years old and have been doing CrossFit for 18 months. Prior to CF, I was doing nothing--no fitness program at all besides occasional walks around our neighborhood or hikes. I'm also down around 65 pounds over the last ~2.5 years (that's mostly paleo and partly CF).

I also homeschool/chauffeur/feed/clothe/boss three children (and I boss my husband as well, heh), manage a couple of small businesses in my spare time, and, oh yeah, got through The House Closing From Hell AND moved to a new house DURING THE OPEN. (I mention all of this in case you're thinking you're too old or busy or tired to keep up with something like, oh let's say, next year's CF Open, for example.)

I was nervous about participating, and seriously nervous before some of the WODs, but I am SO HAPPY that I did this year's Open. There was only one skill in the whole thing that I literally couldn't do, and I have a whole year to improve my weakest areas (double-unders and pull ups) and get stronger (so maybe a 100# snatch might be no problem next time). I can't wait to see what I will be capable of in next year's Open!

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Saturday, April 14, 2012

Video: Is Public Breastfeeding Indecent?

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Philosophy in Action Webcast, I discussed public breastfeeding. The question was:

Is breastfeeding children in public wrong? My wife and I want to have kids, and one question we have concerns public breastfeeding. Is it immodest or improper to breastfeed in public? Should stores permit or forbid it on their premises? Should public breastfeeding be restricted or banned by law as indecent?
My answer, in brief:
People ought to support public breastfeeding, even if they prefer not to look at it. It's not a sexual act, and mothers should be able to feed their babies when they're out and about.
Here's the video of my full answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends via social media, forums, and e-mail! You can also throw a bit of extra love in our tip jar.

Join the next Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live.

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, e-mail, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Webcast Archives, where you can listen to the full webcast or just selected questions from any past episode, and our my YouTube channel. And go to the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming webcast episodes.

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Video: Should You Try to Cultivate Good Luck?

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Philosophy in Action Webcast, I discussed cultivating good luck. The question was:

Can and should a person try to cultivate his own "good luck"? For example, a construction worker might leave his business card with neighbors in case they or anyone they might know happens to need his services in the future. Similarly, an investor might look to buy stock in companies with promising patents pending or forthcoming products. Is pursuing these kinds of uncertain opportunities a means of cultivating good luck?
My answer, in brief:
Good luck is not a force in the universe that a person can cultivate. Rather, to the extent that a person extends his knowledge and control over his life, he minimizes the effects of luck in life. That's the right approach.
Here's the video of my full answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends via social media, forums, and e-mail! You can also throw a bit of extra love in our tip jar.

If you're interested in further discussion of this topic, you can buy my four-lecture 2010 OCON course -- Luck in the Pursuit of Life -- from the Ayn Rand Bookstore for the low low price of $22.38!

Join the next Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live.

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, e-mail, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Webcast Archives, where you can listen to the full webcast or just selected questions from any past episode, and our my YouTube channel. And go to the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming webcast episodes.

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Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post a link to The Objectivist Roundup. The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

Rule of Reason hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

Also, in my live Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday morning, I'll answer questions on the morality of breaking the law, the morality of vigilantism, stealing valor, selling sub-optimal products, and more. As always, it's on Sunday, 15 April 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live. Please join us for this hour of lively discussion, where we apply rational principles to the challenges of living virtuous, happy, and free lives!

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: The Morality of Breaking the Law: When is it moral to break the law? Laws should be written to protect individual rights. Unfortunately, many laws today violate rights. When should I abide by a rights-violating law, and when is it proper to break it?

  • Question 2: The Morality of Vigilantism: Where is the line between justice and vigilantism? When is it moral to take the law into your own hands – meaning pursuing, detaining, and/or punishing criminals as a private citizen? Suppose that you know – without a shadow of a doubt – that some person committed a serious crime against you or a loved one. If the justice system cannot punish the person due to some technicality, is it wrong for you to do so? If you're caught, should a judge or jury punish you, as if you'd committed a crime against an innocent person?

  • Question 3: Stealing Valor: Should "stealing valor" be a crime? Rencently, a man was arrested by the FBI in Houston and charged with "stolen valor." This is the charge made against someone who falsely poses as a decorated soldier. Is it proper to make this a crime? Why or why not?

  • Question 4: Selling Sub-Optimal Products: What should a businessman do if he decides that his product or service is not really good? More specifically, what should a businessman do if he's rises up in the business world on promoting a particular product or service, only to learn decades into the ventures that there are better alternatives? As a fictional example, let's take a mattress manufacturer CEO. He has spent decades of his life trying to make the most comfortable mattresses possible, but then read scientific studies that concludes that there is no healthier sleeping surface than the solid floor, and in using his honest judgment he agrees. Being so high up and so long involved in the mattress world, what are the moral range of options for him?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you can't attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as audio-only podcasts by subscribing to our RSS Feeds. You can also listen to full episodes or just selected questions from any past episode in the Webcast Archive, including questions on paleo, nutrition, and health. Finally, don't forget to submit and vote on the questions that you'd most like me to answer from the ongoing Question Queue.

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Friday, April 13, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #106

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Leigh presents Lemon-Ginger Chocolate Fudge posted at Paleo at Penn, saying, "This is a super simple (and super tasty!) Paleo/Primal fudge recipe, made with dark chocolate, coconut milk, ginger, and lemon zest."

The Lazy Caveman presents Hungry For Change Review posted at The Lazy Caveman, saying, "A review of the new documentary, Hungry For Change."

Tony Federico presents Win From Within! How to Get Yourself Motivated From the Inside Out posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Practical lessons in activating the most powerful form of motivation."

Julianne presents Beef and Butter: a bad combination for your heart? posted at Julianne's Paleo & Zone Nutrition, saying, "In this interesting study – beef was eaten with either saturated fat from dairy or monounsaturated fat, in the context of a low carb diet. Blood lipids were measured to see what difference the fat type made. Beef with butter - i.e. gave worse results that beef with monounsaturated fat."

Suz Crawt presents The Future of Paleo? posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "What is the future of the Paleo movement? Will it go mainstream?"

Tim Huntley presents How to Read Scientific Research posted at My Athletic Life, saying, "Ever wanted to know how to read and evaluate a scientific research paper? This multi-part tutorial can help get you started."

Fatisfied presents Moves Like Daffy posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "Guard! Turn! Parry! Dodge! Spin! Ha! Thrust!"

Jedha presents How To Ease Into Paleo: 5 Ideas To Get You Started posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach, saying, "Many people find that going cold turkey is way too confronting and want to know how to ease into paleo with a little more grace and alot less withdrawals, headaches, food cravings and so forth. Here's a few tips to think about."

Nell Stephenson presents Meds For Senior Dogs? Try Food First posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "In keeping with feeding your dogs Paleo foods, try and focus on giving them antioxidants in real food before going to meds!"

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Baked Parsnip Fries posted at Baked Parsnip Fries, saying, "Our Paleo Baked Parsnip Fries are simple and taste great with steak or burgers! Try this recipe and more at www.paleoeffect.com!"

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents Canola Oil vs. Olive Oil – A Lightweight Title Bout posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "A fun parody describing the health benefits of canola oil vs olive oil."

Ruth presents Colorful Cauliflower and Broccoli Salad posted at Ruth's Real Food, saying, "This is a great ways to eat those veggies. They taste as good as they look!"

Miki Ben-Dor presents Can anecdotes and history match science in guiding Paleo nutrition? posted at Paleo Style, saying, "Although we all treat science with a certain degree of sanctity the post shows that its power to predict optimal nutrition is rather limited. For example, the three pillars of Paleo namely no gluten, low polyunsaturated fats and low sugar all are based on history and accumulation of anecdotes more than on science "

Health Freak Eddy presents The Expensive Paleo Myth P2 posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "In part 2, Wench has outlined some of the practical strategies for combining paleo and frugal living, I'd say its a more in depth strategy than just freezing whole cows! lol Enjoy"

Kelly Bejelly presents Pcos, Fertility and the Primal diet posted at A Girl Worth Saving, saying, "How I overcame PCOS with the Primal diet."

Melissa Fritcher presents Sleep on it; Or: Reboot Your Brain, Why a Step Back is Often Three Steps Forward posted at LessofMimi, saying, "Why I'm concentrating on minimizing stress right now, above all else, and how I'm hoping it will help my weight loss journey."

Neely Quinn presents Full Disclosure: My Diet, Sleep, and Exercise for A Week posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "In the name of transparency and because all she REALLY wanted to ask the bloggers and authors at PaleoFX was "What do you eat?", Neely recorded everything she ate and did for a week."

Angie presents Bacon and Egg Cups posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying, "Do you love coconut flour pancakes? Know what makes them better? Chocolate! You'll love this recipe for chocolate pancakes made with coconut flour and sweetened with banana. "

The Cavegirls presents Chocolate Pancakes posted at Northwest Cavegirls, saying, "Do you love coconut flour pancakes? Know what makes them better? Chocolate! These chocolate pancakes are made with coconut flour and sweetened with banana. "

Angie presents Bacon and Egg Cups posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying, "Looking for a "fancy" looking egg dish to serve for breakfast, brunch or even dinner? These bacon and egg cups are incredibly easy to make, very tasty and look gorgeous. "

J. Stanton presents Big Brains Require An Explanation, Part VI: Why Learning Is Fundamental, Even For Australopithecines posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, "How small selection pressures can cause huge changes over millions of years, via a layman's introduction to population genetics and gene fixation."

Wenchypoo presents Speaking of not recommending nuts and seeds... posted at Wisdom From Wenchypoo's Old Bat Cave, saying, "Taking what Primal Toad recently posted about 7 reasons to say no to nuts, I was reminded of a book I recently read. Contains commentary about the book, and veganism in general."

Alison Pierce presents Bacon-Wrapped Everything posted at Counterculture Cooking, saying, "A video tutorial for pork loin roasts, shrimp & scallops, and figs & dates -- all wrapped in nature's candy."

Yael Grauer presents Book Review: Paleo Diet Budget Shopping Guide posted at Yael Writes, saying, "Check out my review of Robb Wolf's new e-book!"

Joe Lindley presents Diet as Entertainment – Is Rosie O’Donnell Your Diet Guru? posted at Craving Sugar, saying, "I reached my limit on hearing mixed bag diet advice this last week watching the Dr. Oz show. He interviewed Rosie O’Donnell on the diet she used to lose 15 pounds. I won’t go into the details, but as you can see in the video below, her diet included a morning “green” shake. In the full episode, she elaborated on the 3 balanced meals she eats every day, that fish is the main protein several days a week, and that she also has cereal for breakfast. There wasn’t enough information on the nutritional components of the diet to evaluate whether it would help anyone. "

Amy Kubal presents What the Paleo World Eats posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Show the rest of the world what Paleo looks like! This is what the Paleo World eats!!"

Beth Mazur presents Starch and weight loss posted at Weight Maven, saying, " being able to incorporate starch in my meals has been an important part of my weight loss success. For me, it's all about the life you'll enjoy, not the one you'll tolerate!"

Cavechic presents Paleo and MS posted at Paleo for Christians, saying, "There is quite a bit of contradictory information out there about nutrition and MS. Following the Paleo diet can alleviate MS symptoms and related complications. "

Laurie Donaldson presents Enough Meat? posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "New freezer, new meat. Winter is coming! ;)"

Peggy Emch presents High Carb Diets Can Cause Morning Sickness posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Morning sickness isn't just the luck of the draw. Our diet and lifestyle play a big role in our hormone balance, which is what's behind the nausea in the first place."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Sausage

By Diana Hsieh

Karls Sausage Kitchen 005

The Modern Paleo Question of the Week is:
What's your favorite type and/or brand of sausage?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Saturday, April 07, 2012

Video: Unfriendly Disputes in Online Communities

By Diana Hsieh

In last Sunday's Philosophy in Action Webcast, I discussed unfriendly disputes in online communities. The question was:

Why are disputes so belligerent in online communities? I've noticed that people get into very loud and heated disputes online, whereas that doesn't seem to happen in local communities. Disputes in local communities tend to be less frequent, less belligerent, and last for a shorter time - even when some people end up hating each other and refusing to have anything to do with each other in the end. Why is that? Also, why do people who are closest with each other (whether close friends, dating, or married) seem to agree more on hot-button issues? Are people more willing to reject a stranger's arguments than those of a friend? Is that an error?
My answer, in brief:
Conflicts with other people are inevitable in life. Online conflicts are often more belligerent, due to the differences between online and in-person communication. People should try to manage online conflicts in a sane way, with respect for facts about the limitations of the medium.
Here's the video of my full answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends via social media, forums, and e-mail! You can also throw a bit of extra love in our tip jar.

Join the next Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live.

In the meantime, Connect with Us via social media, e-mail, RSS feeds, and more. Check out the Webcast Archives, where you can listen to the full webcast or just selected questions from any past episode, and our my YouTube channel. And go to the Question Queue to submit and vote on questions for upcoming webcast episodes.

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Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

Due to problems with BlogCarnival, the Objectivist Round Up didn't happen this week. (Boo Hoo!)

But... In my live Philosophy in Action Webcast on Sunday morning, I'll answer questions on cultivating good luck, public breastfeeding, national identification card, repeatedly reviewing memories, and more. As always, it's on Sunday, 8 April 2012 at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET at www.PhilosophyInAction.com/live. Please join us for this hour of lively discussion, where we apply rational principles to the challenges of living virtuous, happy, and free lives!

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: Cultivating Good Luck: Can and should a person try to cultivate his own "good luck"? For example, a construction worker might leave his business card with neighbors in case they or anyone they might know happens to need his services in the future. Similarly, an investor might look to buy stock in companies with promising patents pending or forthcoming products. Is pursuing these kinds of uncertain opportunities a means of cultivating good luck?

  • Question 2: Public Breastfeeding: Is breastfeeding children in public wrong? My wife and I want to have kids, and one question we have concerns public breastfeeding. Is it immodest or improper to breastfeed in public? Should stores permit or forbid it on their premises? Should public breastfeeding be restricted or banned by law as indecent?

  • Question 3: National Identification Card: Should the government institute a national id card? Periodically, politicians speak of instituting a national identification card in order to protect identify and track potential terrorists, prevent the hiring of illegal immigrants, stop welfare fraud, and more. Would such a national id card violate rights – or be unwise for other reasons? Are state-level identification cards sufficient? Are they proper?

  • Question 4: Repeatedly Reviewing Memories: Should I mull over my memories less frequently? Is it unhealthy for a person to continuously mull over previous events and specific memories? I go over past events in my mind on a constant basis. I try to recall specific details (i.e., things I was thinking at the time, etc.) and keep a perfect "image" of the memory/event in my mind as long as possible. Is this strange, unhealthy, or counterproductive?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you can't attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as audio-only podcasts by subscribing to our RSS Feeds. You can also listen to full episodes or just selected questions from any past episode in the Webcast Archive, including questions on paleo, nutrition, and health. Finally, don't forget to submit and vote on the questions that you'd most like me to answer from the ongoing Question Queue.

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Friday, April 06, 2012

The Paleo Rodeo #105

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Charissa Vercellone presents 5 Questions with "Paleo Pals" author, Sarah Fragoso posted at Balanced Bites, saying, "Sarah is the National Bestselling author of Everyday Paleo, a trainer at NorCal Strength & Conditioning, and a mom to three boys. I had a chance to catch up with her to chat about her new book, Paleo Pals: Jimmy and the Carrot Rocket Ship."

Tony Federico presents Buried in Bacon? posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "From the makers of Bacon Salt, Bacon Pop, and Baconnaise comes the bacon coffin. Have we finally gone too far with bacon? Or is it not far enough?"

Kelly Fitzsimmons presents Macadamia Nut Oil - Move On Over Olive posted at Weight Loss Ninja, saying, "Macadamia nut oil is making a splash in the culinary world, their rich buttery taste is just heavenly."

Joe Lindley presents Sugar Is Toxic - Dr. Robert Lustig on 60 Minutes posted at Craving Sugar, saying, "Paleo advocates will appreciate the complete CBS News 60 Minutes video below. This report was aired this last Sunday April 1, at 7 p.m. ET/PT. It includes an interview with Dr. Robert Lustig, a renowned endocrinologist, by Dr. Sanjay Gupta. I have posted 7 different articles on this site covering Dr. Lustig's interviews and presentations on the toxicity of sugar because his arguments are both sound and authoritative. He is adamant that we need to wake up and do something major to reduce our sugar consumption."

Laurie Donaldson presents Ribs and Smoky Paprika Bok Choy posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "I took a little break in March, but I am back with a new twist on bok choy."

Miki Ben-Dor presents The real chimpanzee diet - Fat, Glucose, Protein and a little Fructose posted at Paleo Style, saying, "How much fruit/fructose is safe?. This post analyse the chimpanzee's diet in order to gain insights not only about fruit but also about evolutionary guided fat and protein consumption."

Diana Hsieh presents SuperSlow Achievement Unlocked: 300 Pound Leg Press posted at NoodleFood, saying, "I'm thrilled to have reached my goal of 300 pounds on the leg press in SuperSlow, particularly because I did it a few weeks earlier than expected!"

Angel Ayala & Meghan Little presents Asian Beef Lettuce Wraps posted at Asian Beef Lettuce Wraps, saying, "Our Asian Beef Lettuce Wraps are easy and delicious. The mildly sweet flavor of ginger calms the slightly spicy flavor of the chiles in this easy to make, fun to eat meal. Try this recipe with our delicious Chicken Fried "Rice" recipe, made with cauliflower for a meal the whole family will love!"

Neely Quinn presents My Body Image posted at Paleo Plan, saying, "Neely Quinn, nutrition therapist from paleoplan.com, shares her own before and after story and how she still struggles with body image issues. "

Riki Shore presents Adobo Chicken posted at Three Squares, saying, "Moist and tender drumsticks simmered in vinegar and wheat-free tamari. Very easy and delicious!"

Nell Stephenson presents Healthy Ways to Fuel Your Workout? posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson discusses the disadvantage of the fact that the endurance community receives so much misinformation about 'needing to eat grains, dairy and legumes' when it's simply not the case."

Jedha presents Paleo Homemade Pesto posted at Paleo Weight Loss Coach, saying, "This episode of the paleo cooking show Paul whips up a super simple paleo homemade pesto to eat with your favorite dish"

Douglas Robb presents Paleo Dessert Recipes - Vol. 1 posted at Health Habits, saying, "Mmmmmmmmm Paleo"

Douglas Robb presents How to Get Your Kids to Eat Paleo posted at Health Habits, saying, "Getting kids to eat their vegetables has been a parental challenge since the dawn of time. But there is a solution..."

Fatisfied presents Burpeeology posted at Free Your Fat, saying, "The study of a fundamental Mini Exertion movement."

Health Freak Eddy presents Ripping Apart Government Ideas posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "Got a bit ranty when I found out the UK government's latest solution is to just cut peoples calories for them. A short read though."

Suz Crawt presents Weston A Price V The Paleo Diet posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "The key difference between the two approaches - and perhaps more importantly, the similarities!"

Suz Crawt presents Butter Guilt Trip posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "More pressure from the food industry to make us eat un-healthy "health food", when will it end?"

Tony Federico presents RIB (Rest In Bacon) posted at Fitness In An Evolutionary Direction, saying, "When too much bacon is still not enough."

Peggy Emch presents IBS, Depression, and Skin Problems in Fructose Malabsorption posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Fructose malabsorption is a common digestive disorder which may be responsible for bloating, acne, rashes, mood disturbances, and many other symptoms. "

Douglas Robb presents How to Get Your Kids to Eat Paleo posted at Health Habits, saying, "Getting kids to eat their vegetables has been a parental challenge since the dawn of time. But there is a solution..."

The Cavegirls presents Quick Paleo Breakfast Stir Fry posted at Northwest Cavegirls, saying, "Yep, I LOVE sausage. I use chicken sausage in several places that I used to use a more traditional Italian sausage, but my "go to" with this sausage is to just scramble it in a cast iron skillet and add a "mess o' greens", as my family would say, to stir fry up with it."

Paleo Parents presents Stacy's New Protocol and Mantra posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "Stacy discusses recent health setbacks, her decision to use supplements, and the judgment of others."

Angie presents Everyday Cookie posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying "The idea of the Paleo Parent's Anytime cookie, which is a cookie that contains only healthy food that is good to eat anytime, is an awesome idea. If I can make a ""Treat"" that the kids love to eat, but contains protein, vitamins and such without added sugar, then I wouldn't mind if they had a couple for breakfast, or had one in their school lunch bag or had one for an after school snack. Using ingredients I had on hand, I constructed my version of the Anytime Cookie and now plan serve them to my kids Every day!"

Crystal Meadows presents I'm OK, You're Fat posted at Against the Grain, saying, "How much body fat is normal and healthy for a woman?"

Peggy Emch presents Teach Kids to Read "High Fructose Corn Syrup" in Ingredient Lists posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Evelyn learned some new "sight words" this week to help arm her for the weekend with grandma. It wasn't just educational, it was really fun!"

Todd Dosenberry presents 21 Reasons to Start the 21 Day Sugar Detox Today posted at Primal Toad, saying, "Sugar is addicting. Discover why a sugar detox is invaluable to your life."

Amy Kubal presents Baskets of Health: The Easter Bunny Goes Paleo posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Make your Easter Baskets Paleo friendly!!"

Paul Jaminet presents Theory of the Stork: New Evidence posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Is it really storks who bring babies? A closer look at the evidence."

Mark presents Success in Using Performance Enhancing Drugs posted at Low Carb Learning, saying "Just kidding, but perhaps, based on Dr. Attia's latest post, where he asks the question, "What do anabolic steroids, EPO, and carbohydrates have in common?", I think he's onto something. Do we need carbohydrates to sustain an exercise routine?"

Brittney Beckham presents Balsamic Mustard Chicken posted at Journey to a Healthier Lifestyle.

Brittney Beckham presents Chicken Piccata posted at Journey to a Healthier Lifestyle.

Julia Campbell presents microgreens salad with garlic mustard vinaigrette posted at the crankin' kitchen, saying, "this is the absolute perfect spring salad made with peppery baby plants. I LOVE SPRING!"

Arsy Vartanian presents EAT in Austin, TX posted at Rubies & Radishes, saying, "A guide to dining paleo in Austin, TX!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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