Saturday, October 29, 2011

Video: Friendships with People of Opposite Philosophy

By Diana Hsieh

In a past Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed friendships with people of opposite philosophy. The question was:

How can I maintain my integrity in friendships with people of opposite philosophic views? I struggle to keep good relations with family and friends who support our current political system in which some people are helped at the expense of others, which I regard as slavery. They support ObamaCare, EPA restrictions, and welfare programs. Through years of caring discussions, I realize that they do not hold the individual as sacred but instead focus on what's best for "the group." At this point, I often feel more pain than pleasure being with them, even though we have many other values in common, yet I hate to cut them off. How can I maintain good relationships with them -- or should I stop trying?
Here's the video of my answer:

If you like it, please share it! Also, all my webcast and other videos can be found on my YouTube channel.

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Video: State Involvement in Marriage

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed whether and how the state should be involved in marriage -- a crucial question for the debates about gay marriage. The question was:

Should the state be involved in marriage contracts? Many people say that gay marriage shouldn't be a political issue, because the state shouldn't be involved in defining marriage at all. Is that right? Why or why not?
My view, in brief:
We ought to separate politics and marriage, by treating marriage like any other contract. The state has a limited but crucial role to play in marriage to ensure that marriage contracts are objective, voluntary, and enforced. However, the state should not play social engineer by deciding who can get married or the terms of that marriage.
Here's the video of my answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends in e-mail and social media! You can also throw a bit of extra love in our tip jar.

All my webcast and other videos can be found on my YouTube channel.

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Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post a link to The Objectivist Roundup. The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

Parenting Is... hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

Also, my next live Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be on Sunday morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from www.RationallySelfish.com.

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: The Purpose of Bankruptcy Law: What is the proper purpose of bankruptcy laws? When should a person renegotiate his debt with lenders, if ever? Should a person be able to wipe his debt clean by going into bankruptcy? You've suggested that a person shouldn't be able to do that, but shouldn't lenders be responsible for who they lend money to?

  • Question 2: Bathrooms for the Transgendered: Which bathroom should a transgendered person use? The brutal attack at McDonald's on a transgendered person in April 2011 was apparently started because that person used the ladies restroom, which was already occupied by a 14 year old. Was the transgendered person wrong to use that restroom?

  • Question 3: Private Versus State Prisons: Should prisons be run by the state or private companies? After reading this Huffington Post article ( http://huff.to/pqmeAk ), I wonder whether prisons should be run by private companies or the state. I tend to think private is almost always better than anything state-run, but the current system of private prisons seems to be corrupt at best. More generally, what would a prison system look like in a free society?

  • Question 4: Revealing Atheism to Religious Parents: How much should I tell my parents about my beliefs, given that I'm still financially dependent on them? I'm in college, and if I told my parents that I'm an atheist, they'd probably stop paying my tuition. Should I tell them now, or wait until I'm done college?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

Read more...

Friday, October 28, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #084

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Angie presents Paleo/Primal Breads posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying, "Here are a couple recipes for Paleo bread using almond flour and coconut flour. I went a little crazy with one recipe and added a ton of veggies to it as well!"

Benjamin Skipper presents The Tea Room 60% Green Earl Grey posted at Capital Bean, saying, "Mmm, tea in a bar."

Nell Stephenson presents Smoothies Without Protein Powder? posted at TrainWithNellie.

Suz Robinson presents Diabetic Sweets posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "The sweets being marketed to diabetics as an alternative to spinach or almonds"

Dustin Baxley presents 10 Tips to Make You a Better Cook posted at eating and other stuff., saying, "Takin' it back to basics this week!"

Tara Grant presents Primalgirl Talks: Robb Wolf at the AHS posted at Primal Living, saying, "I recently sat down with Robb Wolf at the Ancestral Health Symposium in Los Angeles and asked him a few questions. Although I was extremely nervous to be in the presence of greatness, Robb is very easy to talk to - and since he talks a lot for a living, he mostly carried the conversation."

Peggy Emch presents When Good Health Destroys a Perfectly Decent Marriage posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Going Paleo can be the miracle that saves a marriage, but sometimes - I'm guessing when there are more mental problems involved - getting healthy can be isolating."

Ruth Almon presents Ruth's Real Food: Headline: British Penises Disappearing posted at Ruth's Real Food, saying, "British penises are disappearing at an alarming rate. This can't be good."

Benjamin Skipper presents Safeway Select 72% Blueberry Almond posted at Capital Bean, saying, "A gem hidden at Tom Thumb. Blueberry lovers should definitely try this."

Stacy Toth presents Wildtree $50 Giveaway posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "Enter to win a $50 gift card from Wildtree! Enjoy all their fantastic and Paleo-Friendly products from their spice blends to their oils to their sauces! We recommend!"

Angie presents Paleo Pumpkin Pie posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying, "Every year I host a Thanksgiving Pot luck for friends. But this year I'll be hosting Paleo Thanksgiving! This Paleo Pumpkin pie filling tastes just as good as the pumpkin pie my grandma used to make."

Tony Federico presents Caveman Cuisine: Caveman Eggs posted at FED - Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "The earliest stone tools were thought to have been created so our ancestors could crack open bones for their marrow. Eggs too would have been gathered and eaten whenever possible. So, I thought why not cook eggs in bone marrow? The result was a deep earthiness that spoke to my archaic soul. I imagine a family gathered around a communal fire, dividing up the days hunt and harvest, eating with their hands and sharing stories of the past."

Eddy presents Cheat Meal?! posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "Let check our perspective on the cheat meal concept that's been thrown around these days. Is there a place for cheats?"

Dr. John presents Progression to Primal, Evolution Step III ~ You Have Arrived posted at Paleoterran, saying, "Leslie Why Reap on her major revelations on the road to Paleo/primal."

Vanessa presents Eating Dinosaurs posted at Healthy Living How To.

Paul Jaminet presents Local Farming and The Fight for Quality Food posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "In this post, I share pictures from a visit to a local farm and touch on a few issues with our current food production system."

Amy Kubal presents Make the Most of the 'Off-season' posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Don't let the season change throw you 'off'!!"

Meghan Little / Angel Torres presents Paleo Chilaquiles posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Mexico Lindo y Querido! Enjoy this amazing Mexican Recipe based on one of the most celebrated recipes through authentic mexican cuisine. 100% Paleo Effect Approved!"

Riki Shore presents Kitchen Thrift: Kombu Dashi, Japanese Fish Stock posted at Three Squares, saying, "Kombu dashi brings the best of umami flavors and superior nutrition to a Paleo diet. Try this economical and versatile stock - it's super easy to make."

Robin presents Everymom To Ironmom: Kitchen Makeover, Paleo Style posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "Why have wheat-altering appliances like toasters taking up valuable kitchen counter space? I gave my kitchen a Paleo Makeover this week and I'm loving it!"

Jennifer Hunt presents When Paleo Isn't Enough posted at Vibrant Sexy Strong, saying, "Paleo has treated digestion, PCOS, autism, and lactose intolerance for our family. But we still have a long way to go."

Joe Lindley presents The Trouble with Fructose: a Darwinian Perspective - Robert Lustig, MD posted at Stop Craving Sugar with a Low Carb Diet Plan or Paleo Diet Plan, saying, "Dr. Lustig is a well-known critic of sugar and particularly fructose.This article covers a unique perspective he presented at the Ancestral Health Symposium - a reason why seasonal consumption of fruit by our ancestors could have been part of the reason fructose is so fattening."

Laurie Donaldson presents List of Gluten-Free Foods posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Probably going to catch paleo-hell for this, but sometimes people need to wade in slowly..."

Havard presents Health benefits of pomegranate posted at Courageous Mind, saying, "Pomegranate has some truly amazing health benefits."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Food Sources

By Diana Hsieh

080402 shopping cart cupholders

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" is:
What are your most favorite and most common places to shop for food -- and why?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Chocolate Review: Lindt's 70% Cocoa Almond Brittle

By Benjamin Skipper

Lindt has recently announced the arrival of two new entries into their Excellence lineup, 70% Cocoa Nut Crunch (walnuts) and 70% Cocoa Almond Brittle. I was excited to see both of them at my local Target, but unfortunately only the almond brittle bar is qualified for review, as the walnut variety has the dreaded "artificial flavorings" listed in its ingredients. Lindt generates mixed feelings for me given the mixed quality of their products. Their 85% and 90% dark varieties are great, and I've been dying to get my hands on their 99% bar which I just can't find, but by and large their extensive product line contains artificial ingredients which are just unpalatable to my dietary guidelines. I guess we'll just have to enjoy what values there are. Please note, however, that the almond brittle bar contains glucose syrup derived from wheat, so it's possibly not gluten-free.

I'm particularly impressed with it. The bar looks immaculate in its precise uniformity free of any bumps from the brittle or chips off the surface, and you can't see the brittle integrated unless you break in to look at the gradient. It has a smudgy shine and no snap, but the mouthfeel has the wonderful complexity of being liquid smooth and incredibly crispy at the same time. The scent is very strong with toasted nuts and sweet caramel, and the flavor is a dance of nuts intermingled with notes of caramel and a surprisingly fruity chocolate, slightly stronger at the finish. The sweetness made the back of my mouth ache a little bit, being a smidgen too high, but it's not too bad. Overall it defied my expectations and pleased me.

I guess in viewing Lindt as overly using artificial stuff I had established the prejudice that it was a poor quality chocolatier, leading to mixed expectations in coming to taste this. My prejudice is duly uprooted. However, despite how pleasing the experience was, the sweetness is something that doesn't motivate me to keep coming back for more, so I'll probably only eat this once and consider it satisfying in bringing new experiences.

I know it's comparing apples and oranges, but given the similarity I found myself immediately thinking of Endangered Species' 72% Coexist toffee pieces and concluding that I would much prefer the buttery and saltiness of that over the brittle. I still recommend this Lindt variety, but I view it more as a one-time thing. The toffee is my preference.

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Saturday, October 22, 2011

Video: The What, How, and Why of Introspection

By Diana Hsieh

In a past Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed introspection. The question was:

What is introspection? Why should a person introspect? What should a person introspect about -- or not? How can a person introspect effectively?
Here's the video of my answer:

If you like it, please share it! Also, all my webcast and other videos can be found on my YouTube channel.

Read more...

Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post a link to The Objectivist Roundup. The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

3 Ring Binder hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

Also, my next live Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be on Sunday morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from www.RationallySelfish.com.

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: State Involvement in Marriage: Should the state be involved in marriage contracts? Many people say that gay marriage shouldn't be a political issue, because the state shouldn't be involved in defining marriage at all. Is that right? Why or why not?

  • Question 2: Last Names in Marriage: Should women adopt the last names of their husbands? In today's culture, some newly-married women adopt the family name of their husbands. Some keep their own last name. Some hyphenate their names together. Some use their maiden name for work, but their married name in their personal life. Some couples adopt a wholly new name for themselves. What do you think of these various options? Should the possibility of divorce affect a woman's decision? Should the husband have a say in the woman's decision? Should men be more willing to change their own last name to that of their new wife?

  • Question 3: Marrying Someone for a Green Card: Is it moral to marry someone just to obtain a green card? Given the difficulties of immigrating to the United States, is it immoral to circumvent those bad laws by marrying someone solely to obtain a green card? Would it matter if the person were a good friend?

  • Question 4: Being Too Much Crazy in Love: Is it irrational to be "crazy in love" with your boyfriend or girlfriend -- such as wanting to keep an old shirt and other discarded items? Does it matter whether the relationship is in an early or later stage?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

Read more...

Friday, October 21, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #083

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Julia presents Primal PSL posted at Queen of the Stone Age, saying, "Get your Pumpkin Spice Latte fix!"

Ruth Almon presents How Reid Kimball Cured his Crohn's Disease posted at Ruth's Real Food, saying, "When someone cures an incurable disease, it certainly makes you wonder."

Tony Federico presents Why You Should Care About The New Site Paleo NOMZ. posted at FED - Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Paleo NOMZ is a platform that allows you to combat the idea that eating "just" plants and animals is boring, restrictive, or unsatisfying!"

Amy Kubal presents Don't Be "That Guy" (or Gal)... posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Are your good intentions driving others to eat twinkies and french fries?"

Megh presents Potato-free Hashbrowns posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "These are so easy to make! Like, even easier than actual potato-based hashbrowns, because with these hashbrowns, you don't need to pre-soak anything to remove starches. And now is a great time of year to make it, as the key ingredient is just coming back into season and appearing on grocer's shelves all over the place."

Eddy presents Can food make you happy? posted at Health Freak Revolution, saying, "Where does food fit into your short-term and long-term happiness and goals?"

Tim Huntley presents Smoky Salmon with Mango Salsa posted at My Athletic Life, saying, "Jen Cereghino from Jen's Gone Paleo shares a great Salmon recipe."

Nell Stephenson presents My Paleo Article in 3/GO posted at TrainWithNellie.

Stacy Toth presents A Healthy Halloween Recipe Round-Up posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "The Paleo Parents present a Paleo friendly recipe round up featuring exciting recipes from Balanced Bites, Gluten Free Easily, Civilized Caveman Cooking Creations, Lexie's Kitchen and more!"

Patrik presents Veri - What is the basic tenet of ... The Paleo Diet 101 posted at PaleolithicDiet.com.

Laurie Donaldson presents Chickens are not vegetarians... posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "All about eggs..."

Tara Grant presents Primalgirl Goes to the Hospital Part II: Meal Time posted at Primal Living, saying, "How I stayed Paleo in the hospital. Warning: Long. And bitchy."

Suz Robinson presents Paleo Barbecue - The Paleo Network posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "Meeting up with other Paleo people at the Paleo Beach barbeque to enjoy a feast!"

Todd Dosenberry presents Pumpkin Banana Bread posted at Toadally Primal Smoothies, saying, "We all love pumpkin banana bread... especially during mid to late October and even into Thanksgiving and Christmas... but what about smoothie style?! Give it a try by following my recipe!"

Beth Mazur presents Food, appetite, and overeating posted at Weight Maven, saying, "there is a plausible evolutionary mechanism for overriding appetite, so why the apparent certainty by some that reward plays little to no part in obesity?"

Vanessa presents The End of Overeating posted at Healthy Living How To.

Paul Jaminet presents Bi Bim Bap posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "How to make Bi Bim Bap -- for dinner, or for tasty leftovers."

Riki Shore presents Name That Food 106 posted at Three Squares, saying, "Can you guess this food?"

Mark Siegrist presents Naturally Fit Guy Getting Fat on Purpose: A Flawed Experiment posted at Low Carb Learning, saying, "While a great PR move, this guy's 'experiment' is fundamentally flawed and will prove nothing of value...."

Kristy A. presents DIY Food Adventure Menu: Lunch and Snack posted at Feasting on Fitness, saying, "Continuing the DIY Food Adventure of cooking real food, I share some lunch and snack ideas and how they are helping me maintain a healthy pregnancy."

Patty Strilaeff presents Halloween Hassleback Sweet Potato Bugs posted at following my nose..., saying, "Sweet Potato Bugs beats out Creepy Creature of the Sea Soup for Halloween this year."

Joe Lindley presents Insulin Spray Aided Memory in Alzheimer's Study - Connecting the Dots to Insulin Resistance and Diet posted at Stop Craving Sugar with a Low Carb Diet Plan or Paleo Diet Plan, saying, "This clinical result seemed innocuous but has great meaning in what we may be able to do with an Alzheimers cure in the future - via a reduction in carbs."

Meghan Little / Angel Torres presents Fluffy Paleo Bread posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "Paleo Bread is a great addition to your daily Paleo Diet. Try it out. Follow us on Twitter @paleoeffect, or visit our Facebook Page www.facebook.com/paleoeffect"

Meghan Little presents Paleo Guacamole posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This recipe for Paleo Guacamole is fresh and delicious! Try it with our Paleo Enchiladas, Taco Salads, or Fish Tacos! Get this recipe and more at www.paleoeffect.com!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Question of the Week: Pregnancy

By Diana Hsieh

Pregnant belly

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" is:
Did eating paleo affect your (or your wife's) ability to conceive or the course of the pregnancy? If so, how? Did you do anything special?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Saturday, October 15, 2011

Webcast Video: Sustainable Agriculture

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed sustainable agriculture. The question was:

Is "sustainable agriculture" a legitimate concept? Many advocates of a paleo diet also advocate "sustainable agriculture," including Robb Wolf and Mat Lelonde. Is sustainable agriculture a valid concept? What does (or should) it entail? Should consumers be concerned that their food producers practice "sustainable agriculture"?
Here's the video of my answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends in e-mail and social media! Also, all my webcast and other videos can be found on my YouTube channel.

Also, someone posted a follow-up question on this segment, namely: What's wrong with the principle of sustainability?
In your October 9th webcast discussion of "sustainable agriculture," you didn't discuss what's right or wrong about the basic principle of the "sustainability movement," namely "that we must meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." Is that a proper moral and/or political principle or not?
I'm glad that someone asked that, since I didn't have time to discuss it in the webcast itself. So if you'd like to me to answer it sooner rather than later -- and I hope so! -- you can vote for it here.

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Video: To Recyce or Not

By Diana Hsieh

In a past Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed to recyce or not. The question was:

Should I recycle? When I don't have to go out of my way to recycle -- if both bins are right in front of me, say -- should I? And what if I am sharing an apartment with someone who will fish recyclables out of the trash and put them in the recycling bin? Are there cases where one should just recycle in order to avoid confrontations at home or work?
Here's the video of my answer:

If you like it, please share it! Also, all my webcast and other videos can be found on my YouTube channel.

Read more...

Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post a link to The Objectivist Roundup. The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

Rational Jenn hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

Also, my next live Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be on Sunday morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from www.RationallySelfish.com.

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: Judging Young Adults: How ought I to judge my college-age peers, given the upbringing they've had? I know that we are ultimately responsible for our actions and our character, yet character is also heavily influenced our culture, education, and upbringing. I was raised roughly the same way as my peers, and I went through the same standardised, state-school education system. Yet I did not end up like them -- largely due to the fact that I read Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. I had an alternative to the ideas offered to me, unlike most of my peers. Without that, I could have ended up just like anyone else. Knowing that, I try to treat my peers gently -- meaning not taking the bad ideas they hold seriously, showing a benevolent warmth to them, and not focusing too hard on negatively judging their characters. But am I doing right, or should I really be harsher in my judgment and treatment of them?

  • Question 2: Voting With Your Wallet: Is it wrong to "vote with your wallet"? A liberal friend of mine recently said that he won't vote for political candidates based on his own economic interests, e.g. that Candidate A promises to raise taxes on his income bracket, while Candidate B promises to cut taxes for that bracket. What's wrong with doing that, if anything?

  • Question 3: Objective Evidence for Free Will: Is there objective evidence for free will? After doing some research on free will and determinism, the existence of free will seems pretty unlikely to me -- even though the thought of free will is comforting. An argument often used to refute determinism is that the determinist says that we should accept determinism, since on his view, he only advocates determinism because he's determined. That seems unsatisfying, however, since that doesn't prove the existence of free will. Also, even if each person can say of himself, "I have free will," how do you determine whether others have free will? How would you know whether a toddler, a teenager, a person with a brain tumor, or a person with dementia has free will or not?

  • Question 4: The Morality of Armed Rebellion: When is a person (or group) justified in taking up arms against the government? In other words, how despotic must a government be for violent revolution to be morally justified? Before that point, is a person just engaged in "terrorism"?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

Read more...

Friday, October 14, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #082

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Tony Federico presents The Domestication of Man: What the Silver Fox and Aurochs Tell Us About Our Own Evolution posted at FED - Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "While we can easily accept the fact that the wolf, cow, and other animals have been radically changed in both form and demeanor due to domestication, whether or not human beings are undergoing the same process is rarely discussed."

Peggy Emch presents Are Low Carb Diets Really Necessary? posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Low carb diets have proven to be very useful for many people suffering from metabolic illnesses, but maybe there is another way, even for very sensitive people."

Dustin Baxley presents Sweet Potato Hash posted at eating and other stuff., saying, "Make a simple, deliciously Whole30-compliant/Paleo breakfast this weekend. Seriously, it's really good."

Benjamin Skipper presents Double: Lindt 85% and 90% posted at Capital Bean, saying, "They're only 5% apart in cocoa percentage. Can they really be all that different?"

Kris presents Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment - How much Vitamin D should I take? posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "An article about how much Vitamin D to take to prevent a deficiency, but this is probably the one most important vitamin for people to supplement with."

Todd Dosenberry presents Is Coffee Healthy? Do You Drink Coffee? posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Coffee has some benefits but it has more negatives. Is it healthy? It depends on how you use it. I do suggest that you may want to reconsider drinking it on a daily basis..."

Ruth Almon presents Thoughts on Eating No Sugar, Sweets, or Sugar Substitutes posted at Ruth's Real Food, saying, "I haven't had any sugar or sweetener of any kind for the last few weeks - no even fruit. The experience wasn't quite what I expected."

Tim Huntley presents Celebrities Go Paleo posted at My Athletic Life, saying, "A cartoon video featuring well know celebrities discussing the Paleo diet."

Joe Berne presents An Open Letter to Chubby People posted at Karate Conditioning, saying, "If you know any fat people... and I'm sure you do... read this. To them. And if you find a better way to say the same thing, please let me know!"

Diana Hsieh presents Two Paleo Cookbooks: Paleo Comfort Foods and Make it Paleo posted at NoodleFood, saying, "I review two new paleo cookbooks: "Paleo Comfort Foods" and "Make It Paleo.""

Nell Stephenson presents KONA 2011 posted at TrainWithNellie.

Steffi presents How to stay healthy despite having a desk job posted at A german cavegirl, saying, "There are things you can do to improve your health situation despite having a desk job. You just have to incorporate them into your daily life."

Dr. John presents The microenvironment: "... an entirely new way of thinking about cancer" posted at Paleoterran, saying, "Mechanisms on how exercise and an anti-inflammatory diet protects us from cancer by improving the tissue microenvironment is starting to come into focus."

Sara Hatch presents Vote for Jan!! posted at Edible, saying, "Please vote for Jan--as a paleo/primal blogger, she is going up against weight watchers and vegan bloggers--show Shape Magazine that we matter!"

Dustin Baxley presents Easy Salmon posted at eating and other stuff., saying, "Check out my go-to way to cook perfect salmon."

Benjamin Skipper presents Green & Black's 70% Espresso posted at Capital Bean, saying, "One of my favorites. Replace your cup with a bar."

Jennifer Hunt presents I'm Not Skinny Like You posted at Vibrant Sexy Strong, saying, "Body image issues don't just magically disappear with Paleo."

Health Freak Eddy presents Beating Orthorexia posted at Health Freak Revolution.

Stacy Toth presents Make It Paleo: made of love. posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "The Paleo Parents' review of Make it Paleo. We made a half dozen reipes and really loved this book. Check it out!"

Laurie Donaldson presents A New Cookbook, a Salmon Recipe, and a Mini-Rant posted at Food for Primal Thought.

Frank Hagan presents Update: The Truth about Beef posted at Low Carb Age, saying, "Grass fed beef has a nutritionally insignificant amount of Omega-3 fatty acids, and cannot be recommended solely on that basis."

Julianne Taylor presents My current view of the Zone diet posted at Julianne's Paleo & Zone Nutrition Blog, saying, "I was recently asked "How are you a Paleo AND Zone nutritionist when they have some major differences on what they allow as part of the diet?"
In this article I explain how, and what I like and dislike about Dr Sears Zone diet (a diet that is a major part of the CrossFit nutrition principles)"

Havard presents Natural allergy cure posted at Courageous Mind, saying, "One of the positive effects I've experienced since going primal is that my pollen allergies are completely gone."

Peggy Emch presents Security Blankets and Other Comfort Objects posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Tempted to take that blanky away from your attached child? Maybe not such a good idea."

Beth Mazur presents Why I don't eat low-carb posted at Weight Maven, saying, "paleo and low-carb are not synonyms. Here's my response to Jimmy Moore's post about our rodeo regular Paul Jaminet's "safe starches" concept."

Meghan Little / Angel Torres presents Paleo Blackened Salmon posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "An incredible way to enjoy a great Wild Caught Salmon! Enjoy and explore new ways the Paleo Way with PaleoEffect.com"

Megh presents Mystery Meat Monday: Mix Up Your Livers posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "Just when I thought there was nothing more I could say about liver ..."

Suz Robinson presents A Typical Day in Paleo Meals posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "People often ask me what I eat - so here is a typical working weekday in Paleo meals!"

Paul Jaminet presents Jimmy Moore's seminar on "safe starches": My reply posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Jimmy Moore organized a discussion of my claim that "safe starches" are a beneficial part of Paleo diets, and this was my reply to a roundtable of Paleo experts."

Mark Siegrist presents Goal Weight Achieved posted at Low Carb Learning, saying, "Thanks!"

Tara Grant presents Primalgirl Goes to the Hospital posted at Primal Living, saying, "Part one of a two part post on surviving the American medical experience. How dialing 911 nearly killed me last week."

Angie presents Naked Momos posted at Bi-Polar Paleo, saying, "Let your tastebuds take a trip to the Himalayas with these zesty meat paleo-ized dumplings."

Robin presents Everymom To Ironmom: Why To Eat Your Facial posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "They say that beauty comes from within, and that's definitely true when "within" is fueled by good paleo foods. Here's how to make a "Facial Smoothie""
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Favorite Cookbooks

By Diana Hsieh

Collection of Cookbooks

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" is:
What's your favorite cookbook, whether explicitly paleo or for recipes that you must adapt? What are your favorite recipes in it?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Chocolate Review: New Tree's 51% Dark Milk

By Benjamin Skipper

While I should be refraining from buying chocolate at the moment, Target was having a clearance sale on this particular item, so the threat of it disappearing forever prodded me to add it to my stocks. New Tree, among a few others, is one of the companies I'm very interested in, not to ignore that their ginger bar is one of my top three favorite chocolate bars period. I find New Tree most memorable for the aesthetic beauty their bars offer in their subtle designs, and more broadly New Tree is known to add various extracts and whatnot to their chocolates to up the health properties, though that is debatable from various dietary perspectives depending on the specific add-in. The treat in intrigue today is New Tree's 51% cocoa dark milk chocolate.

Is New Tree the first to try such an odd combo? I think they are, for I've never heard of it before. Anyhow, in this particular variation they add extra fiber and reduce the sugar by 30% in comparison to the average competitor, and otherwise it's just a good old chocolate bar. It smells of cream, cocoa, and caramel, and tastes luxuriously of caramel with a perfect amount of sweetness and constantly held intensity. I couldn't really sense the vanilla as is indicated in the tasting notes, but I think that means it's well fused into the experience rather than being absent from the taste. I love the mouthfeel: it's very firm without being crunchy and melts into that fatty deliciousness notable of chocolates with low melting points.

The appearance struck me as odd, however. Unlike other of New Tree's products, this one merely had lines traveling down at an angle on each square, not those wonderful leaf veins I've seen on the mint and ginger bars. Why the switch-up in such great aesthetics? Moreover, why does the packaging show the chocolate as having leaf veins when it doesn't? Otherwise, it has an okay shine, though no snap.

I'm glad the wrapper is different. This one is much easier to rip and isn't sealed entirely shut like some of the other products are, which makes the confection much easier and quicker to get to without damaging it. I deplore the strong and sealed wrappers I came across before, as I kept breaking the bars 100% of the time when trying to get into them.

In conclusion, this is certainly a unique combination for sure, one that looks paradoxical on the surface, but New Tree has pulled it off well enough to leave me extremely pleased. The caramel sensation and fatty mouthfeel are just right, making this my milk chocolate of choice, which I would absolutely recommend.

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Monday, October 10, 2011

Two Paleo Cookbooks: Paleo Comfort Foods and Make it Paleo

By Diana Hsieh

Recently, I was sent free review copies of two new paleo cookbooks: Paleo Comfort Foods and Make it Paleo. I've had a chance to peruse and make a few recipes from the former, but I've only just perused the latter. So it's too early to give my final opinion, but I wanted to at least offer my preliminary thoughts on these cookbooks.

Both books are stunningly beautiful, with full-page photos that make you want to make and eat every dish, RIGHT THIS VERY MOMENT. That's non-trivial! I don't like a cookbook without pictures, as "ooooh, that looks yummy" is a huge part of my motivation to try a recipe.

Also, I like the design of both cookbooks. The recipes consume one page at most, with the ingredient list separated from the instructions. So you can easily assemble your ingredients, and you don't need to flip pages in cooking. The instructions are clear and simple too.

My sole complaint -- and this applies only to Paleo Comfort Foods, not Make it Paleo -- is the lack of a true table of contents listing all the recipes and their page numbers. That's a huge obstacle to using the cookbook, not only for finding new recipes of interest, but also for re-finding favorite recipes. I'd be ever so appreciative if Julia and Charles Mayfield would publish such a table of contents as a PDF on their web site. (Pretty please!) I'd print it and keep it in the front of the cookbook as a handy reference.

As for the recipes, the two recipes that I've tried from Paleo Comfort Foods were stellar, although I must admit that I modified them for my own purposes. I made a stew of their "braised short ribs" (pg 288). That was phenomenally tasty. I also made their "venison-stuffed peppers" (pg 296), albeit with beef and sun-dried tomatoes instead of venison and celery. (I don't much like celery, and I didn't have any on hand.) That turned out fantastic too, very rich with flavor, including the pepper that I reheated the next day for lunch. (The sun-dried tomatoes were an awesome substitution, surely better than celery!)

Just looking through the recipes of Paleo Comfort Foods, I see so many that I want to try, such as:

  • Maryland crab cakes: I've been wondering how to make crab cakes without a gluten-y binder.
  • Spicy salmon salad: Paul adores salmon, and anything with homemade mayo is phenomenal.
  • Bacon-wrapped dates: A favorite of mine at "The Med," my favorite restaurant in Boulder.
  • No peanut sauce: Thai yummy!
  • Creamed spinach: I'm intrigued by the fact that the dish is made with coconut milk.
  • Julie's barbeque chicken: I've not yet tried to make a paleo barbeque sauce.
  • Shrimp skillet: This looks similar to a super-yummy dish that Tammy and Greg Perkins taught me to make.
  • Fish tacos: I love fish tacos.
  • Pot roast: A winter favorite, particularly for Paul.
  • Poached pears: I've always wanted to try making these.
  • Jules' banana pudding: Oh my.
(Note to self: Never ever look through this cookbook again when you're hungry, but trying to do something else. It's freaking torture!)

If you'd like to look at and test out some of the recipes before buying Paleo Comfort Foods, check out their web site. They've got eight recipes posted.

As for Make It Paleo, that's by Bill Staley and Hayley Mason of The Food Lovers Primal Palate. It looks really quite good. I'm not sure, but its recipes look somewhat simpler on average than those in Paleo Comfort Foods. Either way, I'm eager to try some of their recipes, including:
  • Hot pepper hummus: Made with zucchinis!
  • Buffalo wings: So good for an NFL Sunday, I hope.
  • Lamb meatballs with mint pesto: Oh my.
  • Beef tenderloin with balsamic drizzle: I want to eat this RIGHT NOW.
  • Jamaican Jerk Salmon: Paul will love it!
  • Seared Ahi Tuna with Wasabi Mayo: Yummy!
  • Roasted brussels sprouts: One of my favorite fall vegetables.
Honestly, I can't look at any more recipes without having some kind of meltdown from hunger. So I'd better stop now. Oh, but I do want to mention that the cookbook has recipes for a slew of different sauces: it'll be a great resource, just for that!

Overall, if you like to cook and eat delicious food, I think you'll be very pleased with Paleo Comfort Foods and Make it Paleo.

If you're looking for even more paleo cookbooks, check out:
Also, if you've tried any or all of these cookbooks, what are your favorite recipes? Please post them in the comments!

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Sunday, October 09, 2011

Hsieh TU OpEd: Don't Blame Capitalism For High Health Insurance Costs

By Paul Hsieh

On 10/4/2011, The Undercurrent published my latest OpEd, "Don't Blame Capitalism for High Health Insurance Costs".

My theme is that rising health insurance costs are due to statism, not the free market. Here is the opening:

Suppose Congress passed a law requiring that all restaurant meals include broccoli and okra, whether the customer wanted them or not. Restaurants must also charge the same price for all meals, regardless of whether the customer ordered a small salad or a large steak. And they must serve free meals to children up to age 26 whenever their parents purchased a meal.

As meal prices rose, most Americans would understand that this was caused by the government regulations, not the free market. Today, similar laws are driving up the price of health insurance -- and it's equally important not to unfairly blame capitalism for the problems caused by the government.
(Read the full text of "Don't Blame Capitalism for High Health Insurance Costs".)

I'm glad The Undercurrent published this to coincide with their Capitalism Awareness Week project. You can still watch some of their earlier lectures and debates held this past week at college campuses across the country.

Many thanks to Noah Stahl and Ben Bayer for their helpful editorial suggestions. For more on The Undercurrent, check out their website.

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Saturday, October 08, 2011

Video: The Morality of Selling Your Body

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed the morality of selling your body. The question was:

Is it moral to sell your body? Selling our bodies or certain parts of them are perfectly acceptable in our society, such as being an egg or sperm donor, being a pregnancy surrogate, or selling hair. But others are condemned, such as prostitution or selling organs. Where should the line be drawn? When is it moral to sell a part of oneself -- and why?
Here's the video of my answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends in e-mail and social media! Also, all my webcast and other videos can be found on my YouTube channel.

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Video: Fear of Death

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed fear of death. The question was:

Should death be feared? Why or why not? Also, why do most people fear death? How can a person overcome that, if ever?
Here's the video of my answer:
If you enjoy the video, please "like" it on YouTube and share it with friends in e-mail and social media! Also, all my webcast and other videos can be found on my YouTube channel.Video: Fear of Death

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Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post a link to The Objectivist Roundup. The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

John J McVey hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My next live Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be on Sunday morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from www.RationallySelfish.com.

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: Ayn Rand and William Hickman: Did Ayn Rand draw inspiration from the serial-killer William Hickman? I ask due to this article on Alternet: "Ayn Rand, Hugely Popular Author and Inspiration to Right-Wing Leaders, Was a Big Admirer of Serial Killer." According to the article, Rand idolized the serial killer William Hickman and used him as inspiration for the leads male characters in her books, notably Howard Roark. Also, Rand is said to seek an environment in which sociopaths like Hickman can thrive. Are these claims true or not? If so, would they affect the validity of Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism?

  • Question 2: Sustainable Agriculture: Is "sustainable agriculture" a legitimate concept? Many advocates of a paleo diet also advocate "sustainable agriculture," including Robb Wolff and Mat Lelonde. Is sustainable agriculture a valid concept? What does (or should) it entail? Should consumers be concerned that their food producers practice "sustainable agriculture"?

  • Question 3: Product Placements in Art: Is product placement in art a breach of artistic integrity? Given that an artist must select every aspect of an artistic work, does delegating some selection to the highest bidder breach the integrity of the work? Does the type of artwork matter? Would it be okay in movies and television but not paintings? Why?

  • Question 4: Young People and Credit Cards: How can young adults learn to use credit cards responsibly? Some young adults (usually college students) seem to make terrible financial decisions, often getting themselves into serious and overwhelming credit card debt. Others seem to handle their new financial responsibilities just fine. How would you recommend that parents teach their teenage children to use credit cards wisely? What advice would you give to young people headed to college about managing their finances well?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

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Friday, October 07, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #081

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Julie Sullivan Mayfield presents Paleo Comfort Foods: Big Winners and A New Recipe posted at Paleo Comfort Foods, saying, "Paleo Comfort Foods' take on the very popular Thai/Laotian Larb!"

Diana Hsieh presents SuperSlow Update: The First Sheet posted at NoodleFood, saying, "Here's my progress report after 16 weeks of SuperSlow weight training. I'm still nothing but pleased that I quit CrossFit!"

Todd Dosenberry presents 15 Paleo Smoothie Ingredients: The World's Best posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Do you love smoothies but are unsure how to make it paleo? This guide should help quite a bit. I discuss 15 of the world's best smoothie ingredients. With this you will be able to begin making spectacular smoothies. Enjoy!"

Peter Ballerstedt presents Is Grass Fed Beef Really "Rich in Omega 3s?" posted at Grass Based Health.

Tim Huntley presents Buying Meat on a Budget posted at My Athletic Life, saying, "Amy Kubal shares a guest post with tips for buying inexpensive cuts of meat."

Amy Kubal presents Robb's Angels Take on the American Dietetic Association Conference - Mission #1 posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Paleo Dietitians at the ADA conference?!?!?!"

Meghan Little presents Paleo Blackened Salmon posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This recipe for Blackened Salmon has a bold flavor, but doesn't overpower the fish. We like to pair this with our Spinach & Apple Salad, which will be coming out soon in our Paleo Salads edition."

Ruth Almon presents Ruth's Real Food: What's "THE" Cause of the Obesity Epidemic? posted at Ruth's Real Food, saying, "Here it is, folks, the answer you've all been waiting for. Envelope please. The cause of the obesity epidemic is...."

Frank Hagan presents Diet, Gene Expression and Diseases posted at Low Carb Age, saying, "A new study shows that the same diet the USDA recommends leads to increased activity in the genes responsible for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and some forms of cancer. Reducing carbohydrate levels reverses the effect in days."

Tara presents Paleo Pumpkin Chai Tea Latte posted at The Foodie And The Family, saying, "It's pumpkin spice latte season! Don't give in to this sugary at the coffee shop when you can make a paleo version at home!"

Patty Strilaeff presents Roasted Banana Squash & Farmer Market Sass posted at following my nose....

Mark Siegrist presents Top 10 Controversial Low Carb Topics posted at Low Carb Learning.

Laurie Donaldson presents Quick Post-Workout Dinner posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "A quick supper after a workout."

Yael Grauer presents Book Review: Paleo Comfort Foods posted at Yael Writes, saying, "Paleo Comfort Foods is one of the newer Paleo cookbooks on the market--check out the review!"

Nell Stephenson presents Tomorrow's October 1st, and the BIG RACE is ONE WEEK AWAY posted at TrainWithNellie.

Suz Robinson presents Is Raw Milk Coming to Australia and New Zealand? posted at The Paleo Network, saying, "Are we getting closer to being allowed to buy raw milk?"

Megh presents Moroccan-spiced Chicken Thighs posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "This is a very similar recipe to my Easy Chicken Drumsticks in terms of technique (with the added skill of chopping a few things), but has a much bigger, more complex flavor. It's an excellent example of how high quality ingredients, mixed in somewhat unexpected combinations (at least for the average American palette), can yield truly spectacular results."

Megh presents Pickled Jalapenos posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "About a month or so ago we made over a gallon of (lacto-fermented) pickled jalapenos. Because who doesn't need a gallon of pickled jalapenos??"

presents Issues Facing Healthy Teenagers posted at Health Freak Revolution.

Stacy Toth presents Eat Like a Dinosaur: our gluten-free book for kids! posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "Presenting: Eat Like a Dinosaur a book written for kids transitioning to a Paleo diet!"

Kate Yoak presents Sunny side up luncheon posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "I took a little break from Paleo - totally not worth it :-) Here is my first post back: yummy eggs for a hungry work-at-home mom, such as myself. (Dads & grads welcome!)"

Ross England presents Thinking Twice About Attacks on Artificial Sweeteners posted at Think Twice, saying, "I take a look a recent blog post on sweeteners, both artificial and natural, and present my thoughts on the widespread allegation that artificial sweeteners are damaging to health"

Julia Campbell presents braised red cabbage + german sausage posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "Perfect for a crisp October day! Beautiful red cabbage and apples spiced with caraway, fennel, and allspice. Served with browned German sausage."

Robin presents My Escape From Vegetarianism posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "Escaping from vegetarianism is as much an emotional journey as a physical, as much about your soul as it is about food. Here's my story."

Benjamin Skipper presents Green & Black's 60% Mint posted at Capital Bean, saying, "For your mint fulfillment needs."

Paul Jaminet presents Perspectives on Low-Carb, I: Dr. Kurt Harris posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Jimmy Moore has organized a seminar on our diet; Dr Kurt Harris was the first to publish his response, and this is my commentary on Kurt's post."

Kristy A. presents DIY Food Adventure Menu: Breakfast, Bone Broth, and Gestational Diabetes posted at Feasting on Fitness, saying, "New at the blog: monitoring my blood sugar and eating real food breakfasts. Real food CAN be simple and delicious!"

Primal Kitchen's Family Grokumentarian presents A Month of New Things posted at Primal Kitchen: A Family Grokumentary, saying, "As a homebody creature of habit I am very rut-prone, but transitioning our family to a paleo way of life a year and a half ago has gotten me into more fresh experiences that I'd ever have anticipated."

Havard presents How I lost 70 pounds on the primal diet posted at Courageous Mind, saying, "I have lost over 70 pounds on the primal diet. This post explains exactly how I did it."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Paleo for Seniors

By Diana Hsieh

Grandmother at Los Altos

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" was suggested by a reader. It is:
If you're over 70, how has paleo worked for you? (Or, if an older relative or friend of yours eats paleo, how has it worked for them?)
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Thursday, October 06, 2011

Quick Garlic Peeling

By Diana Hsieh

How to peel a whole head of garlic in 10 seconds... no kidding!



It works! It took me about 30 seconds, but I'll get it down to 10 soon.

Thanks to Saveur.

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Wednesday, October 05, 2011

SuperSlow Update: The First Sheet

By Diana Hsieh

In mid-September, I completed my first "sheet" with my SuperSlow gym -- now TruFit Health -- in south Denver. That's a milestone of sorts -- 16 sessions in 16 weeks. Since I know that many people are curious about how I like SuperSlow compared to CrossFit, now seems like an excellent time to blog an update.

As you might recall I'd done CrossFit for a year as of May. I enjoyed it at the time, but I grew weary of it for all the reasons outlined in this blog post. In early June, I started SuperSlow -- meaning resistance training to failure of major muscle groups using slow movements once per week.

So... here's my sheet of 16 weeks. You can click for a larger version. The weight is in the top-left of each box, while the time under load is in the bottom-left. As you can see, I'm doing more movements than just the Big Three or the Big Five.



Here's what I've done, with my progress in load from the first good failure weight (usually at week 3, 6/20) to week 16 (9/19). All the machines are Nautilus, except the lower back and torso rotation, which are MedX.

  • LE/LC: Leg Extension: 50 to 60 lbs. Meh on progress. I find this machine extraordinarily unpleasant. (LC is a 90-second Leg Curl of progressive intensity against a stable frame.) Only done every other week, alternating with Hip AB and Hip AD.

  • Hip AB: Hip Abduction: 55 lbs to 75 lbs. Good progress. Only done every other week, alternating with LE/LC.

  • Hip AD: Hip Adduction: 90 lbs to 105 lbs. Okay progress. Only done every other week, alternating with LE/LC.

  • LB: Lower Back: 108 lbs to 150 lbs. Good progress! You can see that I went from 128 lbs to 170 lbs to 150 lbs from 8/22 to 9/7. The 170 lbs was a mistake: my trainer forgot to adjust the machine. It was the day of Paul's hip dislocation and fracture, and we were all a bit distracted. After that, we realized that I could do much more than what I had been doing, but 170 lbs was too much, so we went down to 150 lbs.

  • LP: Leg Press: 190 lbs to 225 lbs. Good! I love the leg press, and I hate the leg press.

  • PD: Lat Pull-Down: 85 lbs to 115 lbs. Good progress, particularly given how difficult I find this movement.

  • CP: Chest Press: 50 lbs to 55 lbs. Boo, almost no progress! I've not made much progress on the chest press, and we just realized that that's probably because my seat was set too high to fully engage my pecs. That's been fixed, so we'll see how I do in future weeks.

  • Row: Row: 40 lbs to 50 lbs. Okay on progress, given that I've had a terrible time with proper form on this movement, but I'm finally getting the hang of it. Alternating pulling with a 2 minute static hold every week.

  • Ab C: Ab Crunch: 10 lbs to 15 lbs. Okay progress. Only done every other week, alternating with Rot T.

  • Rot T: Rotate Torso: 30 lbs to 38 lbs. Okay progress. Only done every other week, alternating with Ab C.
Overall, I've been very pleased with the SuperSlow method and with my SuperSlow gym -- now TruFit Health. The competitor in me wants to make progress faster, but I'm pretty content, knowing that I'm pushing myself as hard as I can every week. (My absolute favorite thing to do is to tell my trainer that I can do one more rep!) Plus, I know that I started SuperSlow with a pretty darn good fitness base from my year of CrossFit.

Now that I've got 16 weeks under my belt, let me review my bullet points from my original post on switching from CrossFit to SuperSlow:
  1. Measuring Progress: I never bothered doing much measuring or recording in CrossFit because writing anything down would have taken time away from my workout. I'm pretty sure that I stalled out in the last few months of doing CrossFitting, but I couldn't tell for sure. With SuperSlow, I like that my progress is clearly measured and recorded, but that my trainer does the measuring and recording for me. It would just be too hard to do myself in the midst of muscle failure. I've actually fallen to the ground after getting off the leg press machine. No, really.

  2. Time at Gym: I love going to the gym only once per week. That's definitely helped me recover from my adrenal fatigue. CrossFit was not doing me any favors in that regard, not with its periodic "metcon beatdowns."

  3. Sports for Pleasure: I'm happy to be doing the sports that I love, whenever I please, without trying to squeeze them into my CrossFit schedule. I don't just save the time of two hour-long CrossFit workouts per week, but also I don't suffer from periodic bouts of horrible muscle soreness. I'm usually a tad sore and weak for the day or two after a SuperSlow workout -- and that's it. Life is so much more bearable that way!

  4. Exhaustion after Workouts: Overall, I've been much less tired after SuperSlow workouts than after CrossFit workouts. However, for the past few weeks, I've found myself completely exhausted by my workouts for some hours afterwards, to the point of wanting to rip someone's head off and then crawl in a hole. That's not good! I think that's happening in part because I'm getting better at pushing myself to full capacity in my workouts -- which is hard, because your brain has been hollering for you to stop for a good 15 seconds by that point. So I'm more exhausted, but then I've added other stressors on my workout days, like not eating right away, shopping at Costco afterwards, and/or feeding all the beasts and making dinner immediately upon on arriving home. That needs to stop! So in future, I'll do any errands before my workout. Then, afterwards, I'll sit in the waiting room for a half hour, munching on some snacks. Once I get home, I'll sit down for a bit if needed. That will help me feel reasonably good in my post-workout evenings, I think.

  5. Injury Risk: I love that I have zero injury risk. Zero. Think about that as you're doing box jumps, oh my CrossFitting friends! (Seriously, I do worry about you!)

  6. No Summer Heat: I've enjoyed the air conditioning and fans in the SuperSlow gym all summer long! My trainer freezes herself for us -- and I so appreciate that.

  7. Cost: I'm still saving money compared to CrossFit. Cha-ching!
I will say, however, that SuperSlow is damn hard, even harder than CrossFit in some ways. The last minute on every machine is seriously awful, and the last 15 seconds is pure agony. You have to learn to ignore that, knowing that you're not doing yourself damage, so that you can push through to full failure. That's not easy!

In getting to that point of utter failure, I benefit hugely from working with a trainer, rather than attempting to do the workout on my own. As with CrossFit, I just couldn't push myself alone sufficently: I'd give up somewhere between 50% and 80% effort. If you don't have a SuperSlow affiliate in your area, you might be able to find a personal trainer willing to use the SuperSlow methodology with you in private sessions. That's really worth the cost, I think.

Overall, I'm extremely pleased with my current level of fitness on SuperSlow, particularly given that I'm only putting in 30 minutes per week. I've not done any test runs or rows to compare my capacity yet, but I suspect that I'd do as well with those as when I was CrossFitting. I'm able to easily carry two 40 lbs bags of horse feed a few hundred feet into the barn. I can sprint without getting winded. I'm very secure in riding, largely due to working my inner thighs. (That was wholly lacking in CrossFit.) So I can comfortably work my horse Lila for over an hour without stirrups, which is something!

Mostly, I feel healthy and strong -- without inflicting any wear and tear on my body. And that's really, really good!

P.S. If you decide to try my SuperSlow gym (now TruFit Health) in south Denver, please tell them that I referred you!

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