Saturday, July 30, 2011

Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health. Parenting Is... hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast.

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: The Morality of Reverse Engineering: Is it immoral to reverse-engineer a product? Is it immoral to reverse engineer a product, make changes to the product (effectively building a better product) and then sell this new product to the highest bidder (or use it for yourself)? Is this considered theft or a legitimate activity?
  • Question 2: Atheists Singing Religious Music: Is it moral for atheists to perform religious music? I love to sing classical music, and that usually means performing with a group that does religious music, including Catholic mass and other religious songs. Some of these groups are secular and perform it for the artistic value alone, but other groups are explicitly religious, such as affiliated with a church. Is it wrong for an atheist like me to join either of these types of groups?
  • Question 3: This-Worldly Success of Faith-Driven People: Why do some people of faith survive and even flourish? If reason is required for life, and faith abdicates reason, then how can anyone who has faith live and prosper? In particular, how do some devoutly religious people manage to be so productive and creative in business?
  • Question 4: Police Lying to Suspects: Should the police lie to suspects in the course of an investigation? Police routinely lie to suspects during the course of an investigation, usually in order to trick them into admitting something or revealing information they would normally not reveal. Note that the people they lie to may not have been convicted of any crime, and are merely "persons of interest" or suspects. Is this routine constant lying moral? What do you think it does to the policeman's character after many years?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

Read more...

Friday, July 29, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #071

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Tiffany presents A Story About a Shredded Grass Fed Brisket posted at the cavegirl dish.

Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Equal Exchange's 80% posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "Equal Exchange's darkest offering. Does it hold its own?"

Todd Dosenberry presents 22 Emergency Foods to Stock Up On Today posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "You could arrive in an emergency situation at any point in your life. Wouldn't it be great to know you have awesome paleo food on hand? Check out my list and buy some foods off the list today! These are perfect for traveling folks!"

Patty Pittman presents Best Mango Salsa EVER! posted at Primal 30 Day Challenge, saying, "I think this recipe balances the sweet (mango) and the sour (lime juice) in a perfect balance. I tasted it when I was done, and then lost myself eating it with a spoon."

Lauren presents Chocolate Moo-sse posted at Raspberry & Coconut, saying, "This is one of my go-to desserts! It's made with gelatin, low calorie, and low carb. I also show you how to set the gelatin so you can make your own creations!"

Nell Stephenson presents Paleo Stuffed (with Spinach, Tomato, Lemon and Garlic!) Pork Tenderloin posted at TrainWithNellie.

Ryan presents It's Peach Season - Time for Peach Paleo Ice Cream! posted at The Urban Cave - Chicago, saying, "A super simple peach, cinnamon, vanilla and coconut milk ice cream recipe!"

Tim Huntley presents Knee and Shoulder Pain posted at Soil to Sustenance, saying, "Don't let a nagging injury turn into something major."

Kara presents Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies posted at The Primal Home, saying, "Grain free, egg free, almond free"

J. Stanton presents Restrained Eating: Willpower and Why Diets Fail (Why Are We Hungry? Part III) posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, "Willpower is a measurable, distinct physical and mental process...and it takes energy! Learn why it's a bad idea for any diet to depend on it."

Rafael presents 30-Day Challenge: Intermittent Fasting posted at Optimal Health Source, saying, "What can be more paleo than intermittent fasting?"

Julie Sullivan Mayfield presents Buy your copy of Paleo Comfort Foods and WIN! posted at Paleo Comfort Foods, saying, "Our book is finally available for pre-orders on Amazon. Everyone who orders and sends us a copy of their Amazon purchase for Paleo Comfort Foods will be entered into our drawing for a beautiful 4qt Le Creuset piece valued at $220!"

Kris presents Why I am sure that junk food addiction is real posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "Why I believe junk food addiction is real. My opinion is based on the experience of being a drug addict, something that can not be learned from books."

Bree presents Eggplant Domination! posted at primalbree.

Meghan Little presents Paleo Pancakes posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "These fluffy Paleo Pancakes are perfect with fresh fruit or warm maple syrup. Make your family the best meal in town with this recipe and more breakfast ideas at www.paleoeffect.com."

Yael Grauer presents My Top Five Quick and Easy Meals, Paleo Style posted at Yael Writes, saying, "Five quick and easy Paleo meal ideas! Leave your favorites in the comments."

Paul Jaminet presents Mobility and Health: Some Thoughts posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Todd Hargrove did a great guest post on how to develop joint mobility, and this post contains my reflections on his ideas."

Laurie Donaldson presents Paleo Vacation? posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Eating paleo on vacation can be a challenge..."

Meghan Little / Angel Torres presents Southwestern Chicken Wraps posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "A delightful plate for your Paleo Palate. A great summer addition to our Paleo Recipe collection."

Julia Campbell presents potato salad with green beans and herbs posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "Summer veggies, homemade mayonnaise, creamy potatoes, and shaved ricotta salata make one heck of a potato salad."

Melissa "Melicious" Joulwan presents Grilled Cherry Tomatoes posted at theclothesmakethegirl, saying, "These cherry tomatoes are like charred candy straight off the grill -- and taste awesome cool in salads, too."

Lindsey presents Make them extra sloppy posted at Enjoying Healthy Foods, saying, "I am so excited about these!!! The homemade sauce was amazing!!! You must try!!!! :)"

Peggy Emch presents The Carnivore?s Dilemma ? A Diet of Just Meats and Fats? posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Does an all meat or low carb primal diet make you less emotional than you used to be? This week I write about how I learned to control my moods with diet."

Amy Kubal presents Is This Paleo??? posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "My post over on Robb Wolf's site. Some quick rules to help you decide - Is this Paleo??? Especially good for beginners that haven't got to the tinkering and adjusting stages!!"

Primal Kitchen's Family Grokumentarian presents Broadening Snacking Palates: Yours and Your Kids' posted at Primal Kitchen: A Family Grokumentary, saying, "It is a common puzzle for parents: how to break their kids of the iron grip that refined carbs has on their palates. The long term solution to this is to get these kinds of carbs out of regular rotation - and one way to do this is by broadening your kids' palates to appreciate a wide variety of tastes."

Rodney Flores presents Primally Plated posted at Primal Effect, saying, "Paleo style meat balls!"

Robin presents A Paleo Triathlete's Day of Food posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "A visual diary of a day of eating in the life of this endurance-training triathlete."

Tara Grant presents Using Your Brain posted at Primal Living.
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Question of the Week: Respecting Your Paleo Choices

By Diana Hsieh

Doughnuts

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" is:
Do your family and friends respect your eating choices? Do they attempt to lure you with doughnuts or something else? If so, what's your response?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

Read more...

Monday, July 25, 2011

Musings on brain health, the "kettleback", and strength.

By Christian Wernstedt

These are some recent musings from the VitalObjectives FaceBook page containing my brief musings on various health related topics. /CW

Don't be a brain in a vat!

A study confirms the VitalObjectives' approach: If you build whole-body health, disease (in this case dementia) will have no place. As one of the investigators put it: "Anything that's bad for you is ultimately bad for your brain. That's because the brain and body are intimately interconnected -- so any physical health problem can affect the cognitive organ."

In other words, don't pretend that you are a brain in a vat. Take care of your body and you will take care of your brain (which keeps that consciousness of yours alive).

The KettleBack for summer training.

The "KettleBack" from MBody Strength is perfect for bringing a kettlebell to the beach for a work out, or for weighted walks. I ended up walking 7 miles last Monday with a 35 pound kettlebell on my back. A great feature is the way the back pack's design transfers the load of the weight from the kettlebell to one's hips. (I'm not affiliated with MBody Strength, but really like this product - below is a video presentation of it.)



Be strong and live long! (Or should it just be "moderately strong"?)

This study found that having muscular strength has a remarkable correlation with reduced risk of death for virtually everyone: "When examining the relation between muscular fitness and all-cause mortality ... the moderate and high muscular fitness groups had, respectively, a 44% [!!!] and 35% [!!!] reduction in risk compared with the low muscular fitness group, after adjusting for age and sex." BOTTOM LINE: Guys and gals, train with WEIGHTS and GET STRONG!

Now, in reaction to the above, one of my intelligent readers remarked "
But maybe not verystrong?". This in response to the slightly elevated risk in the strongest group compared to the moderately strong group.

This is my answer:

"
I think that very strong is actually what to aim for, but it needs to be done gradually, without drugs, and with an eye towards injury risks.

The slightly heightened risk for the very strong group in the study likely comes from including elite athletes (who tend to burn their candles in both ends) in the sample. Other studies made on elderly subjects show a mortality risk advantage for the strongest people."

Three leg press tips:

I like the leg press. I think that it is a safe and effective alternative to barbell squatting for many trainers. Here are three tips. (I have been leg pressing for 15 years without injury.)

Tip #1: one legged leg press saves the lower back vs using both legs, but take care to keep the back stable and pressed to the back of the seat. Also, always do the proper abdominal brace. (Google mcgill and abdominal bracing for the correct way.)

Tip #2: I avoid going really heavy with a deep knee bend on the leg press as that may stress the lower back too much. You don't want your lower back to round. (Think of a curled up fetus - that's not a look that you want to approach on the leg press machine.)

Tip #3: If your progress on the leg press stalls, try a different type of leg press machine (if available). There is a huge variation in how different machines accentuate the sticking points in each individual's biomechanics. I had to change from a newer Nautilus machine to an older model in order to keep making progress with the exercise.

Read more...

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health. The Secular Foxhole hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast. Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: The Effects of Immortality on Ethics: If science can someday secure immortality, would that affect a person's values and morals? Imagine that scientists discover how to keep our bodies forever young, that all diseases were prevented or cured by nanotechnology, and that we could withstand massive amounts of physical force, virtually all extremes of temperature, and all forms of radiation to due to robotic and genetic enhancements. Imagine, in short, that a person could only die by being sucked into a black hole, but that would never happen because we know where all of them are and could easily avoid them. Would this change anything fundamental about human life, particularly about ethics? Given that the Objectivist ethics is founded on the conditionality of life, would and should virtually immortal people still pursue their happiness and other values? Would ethics have to be redefined or put on a new foundation?
  • Question 2: The Morality of Hiring Illegal Immigrants: Is it immoral to hire illegal immigrants? While laws restricting immigration seem terribly irrational -- both in terms of intent and effects -- they are still technically the law. Illegal immigrants often make themselves available for day-to-day work, and hiring them for a day has an almost zero chance of legal punishment for myself for having hired them. Is it moral to disobey an irrational law if I'm unlikely to be punished for it?
  • Question 3: Carrying a Concealed Weapon: Why would an ordinary person wish to carry a gun? In your July 3rd webcast, you mentioned that you have a concealed carry permit. Why? Even if a person should be allowed to carry a firearm, shouldn't we rely on the experts -- namely the police -- to protect us from criminals?
  • Question 4: Explaining Egoism to Others: Why should I be an egoist? How do you explain that in layman's terms to someone in your life?
After that, we'll do a round of totally impromptu "Rapid Fire Questions."

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

Read more...

Friday, July 22, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #070

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Divine's 70% Mint posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "Mint chocolate is one of my favorite foods *period*. Can mint satisfaction be found in this bar of Divine chocolate?"

Todd Dosenberry presents Why Are We Obsessed With Bacon? posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "I want to know why you are obsessed with bacon. I don't eat much bacon but I have 2 bacon t-shirts and listen to the Jim Gaffican bacon stint daily..."

Kris presents 10 Reasons why you should not have a cheat meal posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "A list of ten important reasons why you might be doing yourself more harm than good by having a cheat meal once per week"

Ryan presents Our "Go To" Paleo Dinner Recipe posted at The Urban Cave - Chicago.

Nell Stephenson presents Eating Healthy Fat = Natural Appetite Regulation! posted at TrainWithNellie.

Kara presents The Best and Worst of Everyday Paleo posted at The Primal Home, saying, "My opinion on the popular book"

Melissa "Melicious" Joulwan presents 5 Painless Ways To Be A (Paleo) Social Butterfly posted at theclothesmakethegirl, saying, "For me, the ONLY negative of the paleo lifestyle if the challenge of socializing. These are my tips for navigating parties without feeling like a weirdo or resentful."

Rafael presents Few Large Meals or Many Small Meals? That's the question posted at Optimal Health Source, saying, "I don't think our ancestors ate three times or six times a day"

Julia Campbell presents shrimp and bay scallop ceviche posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "Stinkin' hot summer day? Ceviche'll cure you! Citrus marinated raw shrimp and bay scallops."

J. Stanton presents Why Are We Hungry? Part 2: Hunger Is The Product Of Multiple Perceptions And Motivations, Sometimes Conflicting posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, "This one goes all the way down the rabbit hole...we've laid the groundwork for some heavy deconstruction."

David Csonka presents Dietary Dilemmas for Primal Parents With Young Children posted at Naturally Engineered.

Robin S. presents Norse God Abs and Perky Pecs: The rules posted at Confessions of a Paleolithic Drama Queen/Caveman King, saying, "I staged a takeover on the Caveman King's blog - and his life. These are the rules I set out for his next 30 days. The "challenge" post can be found here: http://cavemanking.wordpress.com/2011/07/14/paleo-drama-queen-take-over/"

Angie presents Paleo Power Bars posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying, "These power bars are very similar to Larabars, but I think they are more tasty and much less expensive."

Tara presents Cashew Energy Bars posted at The Foodie And The Family.

Meghan Little presents Paleo Chicken Salad posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This Chicken Salad is so delicious for a summer afternoon. It goes great with our Fluffy Paleo Bread! Check out this recipe and more at www.paleoeffect.com"

Lauren presents Mayo- and dairy- free Minimalist Egg Salad posted at Raspberry & Coconut, saying, "I’ve had this for breakfast every morning while on my diet- more about that in my next post! I feel my best with a protein rich breakfast- and I’m still sort-of convinced that eating six whole eggs every day just might give me a heart attack."

Tony Federico presents Viljhalmur Stefansson and the Foodways of the Arctic - Part I posted at FED - Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Long considered a paradox, the Inuit thrived in the world's harshest climate subsisting on a diet of meat and cold water. Are they unique? Or, is the notion of a "balanced diet" wrong?"

Tony Federico presents Viljhalmur Stefansson and the Foodways of the Arctic - Part I posted at FED - Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "Long considered a "paradox", the aboriginal people of the Arctic thrived in the worlds harshest climate while eating little more than meat and cold water. Are they unique, or are we wrong about what constitutes a "balanced" diet?"

Stacy Toth presents Back from our Road Trip Vacation posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "How we stayed Paleo through a 32 hour car trip with three kids."

Laurie Donaldson presents Not-Quite-Pasta Bake posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "A zucchini "pasta" bake recipe."

Havard presents Health benefits of walking barefoot posted at Courageous Mind, saying, "Walking barefoot not only feels great, but it is also great for the body. This post covers some of the direct and indirect health benefits of walking barefoot more."

Peggy Emch presents What to Eat Camping and How to Have a Primal Vacation posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Back from our trip to Arches, the Grand Canyon, and everything in between with examples of three different paleo camping diets."

Rodney Flores presents Primally Plated – Halibut en Papillote posted at Primal Effect, saying, "This simple, tasty version of a French technique is a sure winner. In the oven or on the BBQ this dish literally cooks itself."

Paul Jaminet presents How to Recognize and Fix a Brain Infection posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This is the story of a reader who is successfully implementing our program to fix a mysterious mental health issue."

Frank Hagan presents Fat Doesn’t Make You Fat posted at Low Carb Age, saying, "A new study shows that eating dietary fat not only doesn't make you fat, but may hold the key to the controversial "metabolic advantage" low carb / paleo diets are said to offer."

Robin presents Paleo And Healing: How Diet Makes A Difference posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "Two broken arms, two different years, two different ways of eating: how Paleo makes a difference in healing from a serious injury."

Megh presents Mystery Meat Monday: Jamaican-esque Oxtails posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle.

Megh presents Mayo Should Be Yellow posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "I’m talking bright yellow here — not neon or anything radioactive or painful to look at — but nothing that could possibly be confused with off-white, cream, beige, or, heaven forbid, WHITE."

Sara Bukowski presents Does Buying Local, Pasture-Raised Meat Really Matter? posted at Healthy Meal Plans, saying, "The article linked above contains videos documenting institutionalized animal cruelty in the meat industry. These videos are extremely graphic and disturbing to anyone with an ounce of humanity. I do not recommend that children watch them without a parent present who has already previewed them to make a decision about their suitability."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Question of the Week: Paleo Spouse or Lover

By Diana Hsieh

Wedding Cake

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" is:
Is your spouse or lover paleo? Why or why not?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

Read more...

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Chocolate Review: New Tree's 73% Ginger

By Benjamin Skipper

My readers will have to forgive me for this, for I've been holding off on this chocolate for quite some time. In truth I purchased a dozen of these all at once several months ago and couldn't bring myself to review them until the very last bar, as I kept getting absorbed in enjoying them without distraction. But my last bar has come to pass, so with minor disappointment (and longing for more) I must finally acknowledge New Tree's 73% ginger dark chocolate, which is another fine entry for the New Tree line.

Now, as you may know, I've been thoroughly disappointed with ginger chocolates in the past (1, 2), as in most all of them I couldn't taste the ginger. I theorized that it was because the ginger was crystallized -- cooked in a sugar syrup -- which may have rendered it unresponsive to my tastebuds. New Tree, however, incorporates the ginger in the form of uncooked shavings, which dramatically changes the experience.

Just about everything in the bar is wonderful. The aroma of warm ginger and cocoa is delicious, reminding me somewhat of cardamon and cinnamon, and I couldn't help taking in the scent over and over again. In the mouth the spice and chocolate flavors fuse together perfectly and linger for a very long time, finishing strongly with an intensified roasted cocoa note. The melt is wonderful at warm temperatures, and the residing ginger bits add a great contrasting crispiness in a very subtle sense, just as if there were pieces of fragile glass candy inside. Shine-wise it's dull and "dusty," and it does have some spots on the back from bubbles bursting on the surface, but at least the bar maintains the excellent design standards of New Tree with those very detailed leaf veins.

My only qualm is with the inclusion of guarana extract, which my search suggests is a stimulant similar to coffee. Eating too much of this has resulted in a rapid heart beat for me and more frequent restroom visits, though I really only have myself to blame for enjoying too much in excess, though enjoyment nonetheless. Given how stimulating dark chocolate is on its own I don't think it needs any more boosts, so I think the chocolate would do fine without the extract. Why not replace it with yet more cocoa and ginger? The flavor intensity and balance is great as it is, but more of a good thing ain't a bad thing!

I have to admit that this chocolate is absolutely in my top three favorite chocolates period, the others being Endangered Species' 72% mint and Green & Black's 67% espresso. I just love sitting in bed in the morning, lazily contemplating my life while nibbling piece after piece of ginger goodness. To avoid wasting I am even impelled to go after the miniscule shavings left in the wrapper.

It may be quite a stimulant, but this is one of my favorite chocolates of all time, one worthy enough to be bought in stacks. I enjoyed wrapping myself up in its pleasure so much that I couldn't bare to break my contemplative mood to take tasting notes, and now I'm sad to see my horde has been entirely depleted. Be sure to give this one a delicate tasting if you should find it, as I give it my fullest recommendation.

Read more...

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Video: What's Wrong with the Ideal of Moderation

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Rationally Selfish Webcast, I discussed what's wrong with the standard calls for "moderation," including in diet. Here's the 17-minute video, now posted to YouTube:

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Monday, July 18, 2011

Thyroid Update: The Bliss of Three Grains and Adrenal Supplements

By Diana Hsieh

As I discussed in my "cookie cutter" medicine video...



... I've been frustrated by my persistent hypothyroid symptoms over the past few months. I experienced serious carpal tunnel pain every time I tried to work on the computer. The skin on my hands was like sandpaper. My menstrual cycle was too long by weeks. I felt lethargic and sleepy all day, even after a full night of sleep.

Alas, my doctor declined to increase my dose of desiccated thyroid beyond two grains, given that my TSH was too low on that dose. Hence, I decided to see Dr. Juetersonke of Colorado Springs, because his approach is to treat based on the full range of labs (i.e. not just TSH, but Free T3 and Free T4) plus symptoms.

Happily, he increased my dose of dessicated thyroid to three grains. The difference has been phenomenal. My carpal tunnel pain is negligible. Yay! The skin on my hands is soft and supple -- for the first time in years. Yay! The length of my menstrual cycle is basically normal. Yay! I've not gained any more weight, and I've been able to lose a few of the 30 pounds I've gained due to hypothyroidism. Yay!

To my surprise, my lethargy remained basically the same, however. After the busy fun of ATLOSCon at the end of May, I had that "just-got-back-from-vacation" exhaustion not just for a day, as is normal for me, but for two full weeks. It was miserable! A saliva cortisol test showed seriously low levels of cortisol, but a follow-up blood test showed normal levels, so Dr. Juetersonke didn't recommend doing anything.

By mid-June, I felt that I had to try some kind of adrenal supplement, so I ordered Natural Sources: Raw Adrenal. Much to my amazement, that very day I noticed a substantial uptick in my energy levels -- and even better, my sex drive returned with a vengeance. YAY!

So clearly, adrenal insufficiency has been part of the picture, probably for a long time. I'm too prone to stuffing myself into a pressure cooker with work and other projects... and that just has to stop. It's not so much that I need to work less, I think, but rather that I need to be okay with all the stuff that I'm not able to do in a given day. Also, I've found that activities away from home and/or with people exhaust me quickly, so I'm trying to limit those as much as possible.

Notably, unlike with the desiccated thyroid, I expect to be able to wean myself off the adrenal supplement in a few weeks. Also, I don't think that I would have seriously pursued the adrenal angle if I'd not done the saliva cortisol test (and some others) with our own Christian Wernstedt of Vital Objectives. Our discussion in light of the test results was very enlightening and thorough -- far more so than with any doctor that I've ever had.

Also, I had blood drawn for a new set of thyroid labs a few days ago. I'm not sure whether my doctor will want to raise me to 3.5 grains or not. I still have a slight touch of symptoms, so I think that I'd like to try that small increase. But if my Free T3 and Free T4 look good, I'll be pretty happy to stay where I am.

Overall, after nearly two years of battling my hypothyroidism, I can't express just how happy I am to be doing pretty darn well... finally. It has been a rocky road, mostly thanks to a medical establishment that ignores everything except TSH and prescribes only Synthroid. My every step toward health has been an uphill battle for me. I've had to reject the standard analyses and protocols in favor of treatments that most doctors would regard as quackery, namely desiccated thyroid, high dose iodine, and now adrenal supplements. It's getting ridiculous!

As a result of my experiences, when I hear people say that we should leave medicine to the experts, I feel like a small nuclear bomb explodes in my chest. If I'd done that, I would still be disabled by impenetrable brain fog, lethargy, and pain. Many, many people are suffering in that state today, not knowing of the alternatives. Hopefully, they can learn something from my experiences.

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Sunday, July 17, 2011

Hsieh PJM OpEd: The Coming Collectivization of American Health Care

By Paul Hsieh

The 7/11/2011 edition of PajamasMedia has just published my latest OpEd, "The Coming Collectivization of American Health Care".

Here is the opening:

In the 1930s, the USSR forced independent farmers into large state-run collective farms. Despite possessing some of the richest farmland in the world, these collective farms could not feed the country. By the end of the Cold War, the USSR survived only by importing Western grain. Unfortunately, the United States is about to make the same mistake in health care by collectivizing doctors and hospitals into government-supervised accountable care organizations (ACOs)...
(Read the full text of "The Coming Collectivization of American Health Care")

Note that this government-drive consolidation of doctors and hospitals into a few large provider groups is not some "bug", but rather a desired "feature", because it allows the government to more easily control what kind of medicine will (and will not) be practiced in the US.

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Saturday, July 16, 2011

Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health. Reepicheep's Coracle hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast.

Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: Calls for Moderation: What's right or wrong about calls for "moderation"? Many things are black and white, but sometimes moderation seems like the right course. For example, you don't want to stuff yourself full of every food that strikes your fancy, nor deny yourself foods that you enjoy. So you should eat moderately. Similarly, you don't want to agree to or deny every favor asked by a friend, but rather do some moderate amount. Is moderation a good guideline in such cases?
  • Question 2: Spying on Children: Is it okay for parents to "spy" on their children? Amid the recent controversy over the iPhone's location tracking database, I realized that some enterprising parents might use it to surreptitiously track their teenager's whereabouts. In most cases, I'd assume the parents have good intentions in doing so. Is this responsible parenting -- or an invasion of the child's privacy?
  • Question 3: Family Members Spreading Urban Legends: How should I respond to the urban legends forwarded by a family member? I've repeatedly pointed this family member to Snopes.com, in response to his forwarding of yet another urban legend. I keep hoping that he'll get the hint -- and check for himself before hitting the "forward" button. Yet he never does so, and he's sending false, defamatory, and/or possibly dangerous information to everyone in his address book. This person is pretty smart -- and he's kind and friendly. I'd hate to do anything that would mar our relationship. What should I do?
  • Question 4: Racism in Dating: Is it racist to refuse to date people of a certain ethnic background? Recently, black singer Jill Scott said that she felt her soul "wince" whenever a black man married a white woman. Many people have denounced that as racism, and I agree with that. However, I was shocked to see a black man (known to me only via Facebook) say that he'd never date a white woman due to the history of slavery in America. He even suggested that Tiger Woods was some kind of traitor to his race for marrying blonde beauty Ellen Nordegren. Is that racist?
If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

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Friday, July 15, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #069

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Laurie Donaldson presents Why I Blog posted at Food for Primal Thought.

Josephine Svendblad presents Beet and Turkish Goat Cheese with Guava Dressing posted at Nutty Kitchen, saying, "This latest creation is simply delightful and fabulous. We shared one large beet between us in this salad."

Rafael presents Fast Food and Weight Gain posted at Optimal Health Source.

Jeanna presents Rodizio = gluttony in Brazilian posted at Paleo Adventure, saying, "Can't get more paleo-friendly than at a Brazilian rodizio-style restaurant!"

Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Green & Black's 34% Milk Toffee posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "I love toffee. Does Green & Black's give it flavor justice?"

Kris presents Green Tea vs Coffee – Caffeine content and health benefits posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "There has been a long dispute about green tea vs coffee, both regarding caffeine content and the various health benefits they both seem to possess"

Todd Dosenberry presents Spinach-Stuffed Beef Tenderloin with Red Wine Sauce posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Do you like beef tenderloin? What about wine sauces? Spinach? Then you will LOVE this recipe. Perfect for large parties!"

Tim Huntley presents An Overview of My Training Plan posted at Soil to Sustenance, saying, "My training plan to run a sub-60 second 400m dash."

Julia Campbell presents moroccan pork skewers + grilled eggplant and leeks posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "Try these tapas style little pork skewers with some grilled eggplant and leeks!"

Amy Kubal presents Gluten Intolerance, Celiac Disease, and The "Whole" Grain Story... posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Gluten, grains, and lectins - why we're intolerant and why it's getting worse."

Meghan Little presents Strawberry Ice Cream posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This ice cream recipe is easy and can be done with or without an ice cream maker. Its so good, your neighbors won't leave you alone all summer!"

Sara Bukowski presents Eating Healthy: Meal Plans for the Week of July 10th posted at Healthy Meal Plans.

George Henley presents Salt of the Earth - Rethinking Sodium and Hydration posted at Rolf Devinci Cycling.

Dr. John presents Becoming Paleo, Part 5: Transforming The Projections of Anxiety posted at Paleoterran, saying, "In this part of his series on overcoming his anxiety-eating and switching to the Paleo diet, John Michael writes about how his newfound knowledge of his health instinct allows him to avoid activating the projections of anxiety that were driving him to eat industrial foods."

Kara presents The Danger of Non-Stick Pans posted at The Primal Home, saying, "Why you need to replace your non stick pots and pans asap."

Marc presents Sauteed Spinach Meal posted at Feel Good Eating, saying, "Make your sauteed spinach your entire meal. Easy, tasty and quick."

Diane Sanfilippo presents 10 Things I Learned at MovNat: On Life, Movement and Being in Nature posted at Balanced Bites.

Julie Sullivan Mayfield presents Spaghetti Squash - Oh How We Love Thee posted at Paleo Comfort Foods, saying, "Nutritious and delicious, spaghetti squash is a staple in our garden and our kitchen. Learn the basics on cooking the squash here. Part 2 features our homemade spaghetti sauce which is delightful served over the squash!"

Rodney Flores presents Grilled Skirt Steak with Chimichurri Sauce posted at YouTube, saying, "This simple, tasty dish can be prepared inside or even better on the BBQ."

Rafael presents Trans fats 101 posted at Optimal Health Source, saying, "Trans fat in simple terms"

Robin S. presents What We Eat (And Why) posted at Confessions of a Paleolithic Drama Queen, saying, "What paleo looks like for an average family in the not-so-south."

Lauren presents Crockpot Thai Red Curry posted at Raspberry & Coconut, saying, "Thai food is SO GOOD in the hot summer months, especially cold leftovers! This recipe is super easy, leave it cook all day and come home to delicious Thai curry!"

Nell Stephenson presents Paleo On The Road- An Account From A Client posted at TrainWithNellie.

Megh presents Roasted Red Pepper Leather posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "These are delicious, easy to make, and are excellent on-the-go chip/cracker-substitutes."

Megh presents Mystery Meat Monday: Jerky posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "I’ve decided I’m going to make an effort to post every week about the ways I incorporate non-standard meats into our diets – from hearts and livers to tails and feet (maybe even a snout if I can get my hands on a soy-feed-free one) to everything in between that is icky and gross. This week's feature: Jerky."

Logan Marshall presents The Definitive Guide to Living Wild in the Modern World posted at Wild Movement.

Holly presents Caramelized Italian Pork Chops with Sweet Onion Jam posted at Holly Would If She Could.

Paul Jaminet presents Blood Lipids and Infectious Disease, Part II posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post looks at the immune functions of lipoproteins (LDL, HDL, VLDL), and how they help protect us from disease -- or can promote Candida infection."

Frank Hagan presents Salt is the New Scapegoat posted at Low Carb Age, saying, "Salt is associated with hypertension, and hypertension with heart disease and kidney failure. But does the science show that consumption of salt leads to heart disease?"

J. Stanton presents Why Are We Hungry? Part 1: What Is Hunger? Liking Vs. Wanting, Satiation Vs. Satiety posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, ""I'm hungry." But what does that actually mean? What we call "hunger" is the product of several biochemically distinct drives."

Tony Federico presents Muscle Up - The Primal Diet Mass Building Experiment: Weeks 5 and 6, "A 4-Hour Body?" posted at FED - Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "How much time does it really take to build a better body? I decide to find out by putting the principles found in "The 4-Hour Body" into practice."

Crystal Meadows presents I Want posted at Against the Grain, saying, "What do you want? What are you doing to get it?"

Havard presents What is in a Ding Dong? posted at Courageous Mind, saying, "A slightly different perspective on why you should know the ingredients in what you eat, and why you might want to think twice about some processed foods."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Staying Paleo

By Diana Hsieh

Path in cemetery

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" is:
Have you had problems staying paleo? If not, why not? If so, what's your weakness, and what have you done to overcome it?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

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Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Chocolate Review: Endangered Species 72% Cranberries and Almonds

By Benjamin Skipper

I haven't been doing well in keeping track of my efforts, for this variety had almost slipped my radar and gone unnoticed. Thankfully, someone pointed out to me that I have neglected this variation, so when Kroger had a buy-1-get-1-free sale on chocolate I took the opportunity to pick up Endangered Species' 72% dark chocolate with cranberries and almonds. Nobody is going to turn down their favorite chocolate brand when it's on sale, right? I've tried this before, but that was before my formal reviews.

It's quite oddly constructed, very sloppy. The almonds are plainly visible as humps in the back, and unfortunately in my bar they seemed to be all clustered at one end. That's poor manufacturing; machines could be more precise than that. Additionally, I've noticed that the design on the front has been changed from the lone fruit tree to boring diagonal stripes. What's up with the sudden switch? Overall, it's not that great a looking bar, as the shine is dull, the design is lazy, and it's imprecisely formed.

The flavor is heavily imbalanced due to the inconsistent infusion. Everything is mostly muted and mellow, and the few cranberries present add a quiet fruity touch without the berry's signature tartness. I didn't experience the almonds until the second half where they all clustered together, and even then, without salt, the nuttiness was too subtle, making the almonds mostly contribute a dry and crunchy texture. The chocolate did its job, but it's hardly strong and has a stubborn melt. It smells like milk and nuts, making me think of peanut butter for some reason.

The combination of nuts and cranberries is a good concept, but this is a poor execution of it, what with so little dried fruit and the almond segregation. My suggestion for improvement would be to crush the almonds more finely and salt them, and incorporate the cranberry as an extract. That, I think, would fix the aesthetics, flavor imbalance, and intensity problem.

Nice in thought, but could have been done better. Pass this one up.

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Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Tidbits from VitalObjectives

By Christian Wernstedt

These are some recent tidbits from the VitalObjectives FaceBook page containing my brief musings on various health- and paleo related topics. /CW

Misunderstanding the paleo diet.

There is an enormous misunderstanding about paleo diets held by scores of both proponents and detractors: That the paleo diet is about "what cavemen did". No, no, no! It is about what nature did to the cavemen. In other words, what needs to be figured out is which environmental inputs and stresses form the basis for how human physiology evolved. The answers then inform what the general dietary template for humans should be.

My new DASH shoes from Soft Star Shoes.



I still love my Original RunAmocs LITEs, but the DASH model is more stylish and feels just as great. I don't intend to ever return to wearing "normal" shoes - exceptions made for formal events. If there is one experiment that anyone with knee-, back, or even neck pain should make, it is to try bare-footing shoes for a month. Soft Star Shoes makes the best shoes in this category in my opinion. (I don't get paid to say this.)

Vitamin C as an anti-stress remedy.

Feeling overly wired after having had too much coffee? Take a 0.5-1 grams of vitamin C with flavonoids to clear out the cortisol. Same trick works for me to enhance sleep after some excessive bar hopping.

Therapeutics: The importance of "Glimpsing".

‎"Glimpsing": When a person has a day or two with higher energy, diminished symptoms, and a good mood. It doesn't matter if it doesn't last longer. It is a sign of what the person's body and mind are capable of; that nothing is irreversibly broken; that healing is possible, but that healing is a process not a single event.

Measuring health: Idiotic lab reference ranges.

Lab reference ranges: The ones that you see on your blood test are derived from either a statistical spread that includes many sick people, or recommendations from a committee of politicians and drug industry lobbyists. Wouldn't it be smarter to look at reference ranges that reflect supremely healthy people? I think so, so that's what I do. :)

Have you eaten your steak today? #1

Did you know that the body's biggest pool of anti-oxidants doesn't come from those "anti-oxidant rich" veggies touted on cable TV, but from systems that rest on the body's own anti-oxidants: uric acid and glutathione. These are made from nutrients found abundantly in.... meat and other animal products! No wonder that feel that I age backwards when I eat a steak.

Have you eaten your steak today? #2

In a recent study, the acid taurine reversed metabolic damage in rats made pre-diabetic through fructose overfeeding. The same tendency has been shown in humans. We find taurine in relevant amounts in meats and seafood. (Please don't try to get your taurine from Red Bull.)

Genetic testing? That's cool, but...

I have recommended the 23andme.com genetic test to have some FUN and to DEFY the coming Gov't crackdown. But, really, for health optimization, the test isn't very useful. The health hurdle for most people isn't their genes. It is the maladaptive stress and malnourishment that they subject their bodies to. Optimize your hormones, digestion, detoxification, and immune system. Then we can talk about genes.


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Monday, July 11, 2011

shaved summer squash salad

By Julie

Over a year ago, Joe brought me home a road bike that had been abandoned at his old work. I procrastinated on fixing it up until a couple weeks ago. What a shame. This is the first time I've had a bike since like 2003. THEY ARE SO FUN. I never want to drive anywhere anymore. We live in a really perfect spot for errand- and outing-biking and long distances, too. We live right near the confluence of the Platte River and Cherry Creek. There are trails along both of those waterways and you can go pretty far on them, as well as get downtown easily without having to traverse the whole way on city streets. We're planning an outing some upcoming weekend to bike up north to Broomfield where, unbeknownst to me until a few days ago, is an Abbott's Frozen Custard. Holy. Crap. It's originally from Rochester, NY, where I'm from, and it is summer to me. Plus, not only is the frozen custard itself mean summer, but when I was younger we'd always bike to the Abbott's on the Erie Canal. So we HAVE to bike to this one!


So, while I have indulgent super rich frozen custard looming over me, this salad recipe will be here to balance out my sugar load. It's a such simple salad. But don't let that stop you from making it. It really is worth making. It'll be wonderful for a first course or side dish on a super hot day. If you want, you could put on grilled steak, chicken, or fish to make it a one-dish meal.

I'm betting you'll be able to find lots of fresh summer squash and salad greens at the local farmers' market. I haven't had a chance to stop by the ones near me, unfortunately. There's one on Thursday nights that I can swing by on my way home from work, but I haven't worked it into the grocery routine yet. Plus, the past couple Thursdays I was too busy to make a stop. But that's okay, plain old Joe Schmo grocery store fare was still great.

shaved summer squash salad
adapted (not really) from Bon Appetit, serves 4-6

1 pound summer squash (about 4 small), varied kinds
1/3 cup almonds, toasted and chopped or crushed
2 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 garlic clove, minced or pressed
coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
arugula or chopped/ripped lettuce

1. With a vegetable peeler, peel the squash into thin strips into a large bowl. I had to toss them when they got too skinny that they just kind of crumpled. Salvage what you can.

2. To make the dressing, whisk the oil, lemon juice, and garlic. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

3. Pour the dressing over the squash and let it sit for a few minutes to soak in. Place on top of the salad greens of your choice (arugula would be really nice, but I couldn't resist a super sale on organic romaine). Season again with salt and pepper and top with the toasted almonds.



This was originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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Sunday, July 10, 2011

Crowdsourcing Benefits of Personal Genetic Testing

By Paul Hsieh

At FuturePundit, Randall Parker described how "Crowd Sourcing Identifies 2 Parkinsons Disease Genes".

Here's an extended excerpt from his post:

The folks at personal genetic testing company 23andme.com recruited Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients from mailing lists and other means and compared their genetic variants with a group of 23andMe customers who also got their genetic variants tested by 23andMe.

They used the resulting data to discover 2 more genetic variants associated with Parkinson's Disease. The results demonstrate the speed, low cost, and power of web-based recruiting to do genetic research outside the traditional academic framework.
We conducted a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Parkinson's disease (PD) with over 3,400 cases and 29,000 controls (the largest single PD GWAS cohort to date). We report two novel genetic associations and replicate a total of twenty previously described associations, showing that there are now many solid genetic factors underlying PD. We also estimate that genetic factors explain at least one-fourth of the variation in PD liability, of which currently discovered factors only explain a small fraction (6%–7%). Together, these results expand the set of genetic factors discovered to date and imply that many more associations remain to be found.

Unlike traditional studies, participation in this study took place completely online, using a collection of cases recruited primarily via PD mailing lists and controls derived from the customer base of the personal genetics company 23andMe.

Our study thus illustrates the ability of web-based methods for enrollment and data collection to yield new scientific insights into the etiology of disease, and it demonstrates the power and reliability of self-reported data for studying the genetics of Parkinson's disease.
You can read the whole open access Plos Genetics research report at that link.

What's cool about this: Using a web site and cheap genetic testing services people can volunteer themselves as research subjects on a scale that historically has taken far more effort to organize. This approach can scale into the hundreds of thousands, and even hundreds of millions of people. There's a big network effect where the more people who get tested the more useful genetic testing becomes.

Direct-To-Consumer (DTC) genetic testing is what made the study above possible. Whether we will be able to continue to get our DNA tested without paying for a doctor's visit and additional testing mark-ups remains to be seen. In the United States the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is taking a dim view of DTC genetic testing.
(Read the rest of Parker's post: "Crowd Sourcing Identifies 2 Parkinsons Disease Genes".)

Here's the full PLOS Genetics paper: "Web-Based Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Two Novel Loci and a Substantial Genetic Component for Parkinson's Disease".

I completely agree with Parker. Proposed FDA controls over the growing consumer genetic testing market not only deprive individuals of the right to learn the content of their DNA, but could also stifle the growth of new discoveries (and downstream therapies) made possible only by this sort of innovative free-market "crowdsourcing".

The FDA has no business stopping people from voluntarily sharing their genetic information with others in hopes that they might reap life-saving benefits.

(See also my July 2010 PajamasMedia piece, "Should You Be Allowed To Know What's In Your DNA?")

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Saturday, July 09, 2011

Objectivist Links

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health. Rational Jenn hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast. This week, I'll answer questions on announcing life-changing new beliefs, the morality of strategic default, swearing before strangers, letting friends fail, and more.

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

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Friday, July 08, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #068

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Hachez 88% posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "Hachez is pretty intriguing. How does its darkest offering hold up?"

Todd Dosenberry presents Low Carb Chocolate Almond Smoothie posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "This smoothie recipe is low carb due to the fact that it has 11 net carbs and less than 1 gram of fructose! Yes, it has stevia. I know some personally who has lost over 200 lbs via the primal/paleo lifestyle. Guess what? He is a stevia enthusiast - LOVES the stuff! Be inspired to use it!"

Havard presents Know your food posted at Courageous Mind, saying, "Why is it important to take control over what you eat? It can be frustrating to take control back over your own eating habits only to learn that you are still at the mercy of other people. This post offers some tips on how to take back control over your supply of vegetables."

Tim Huntley presents Pursuing Difficult if not Impossible Goals posted at Soil to Sustenance, saying, "My quest to run a sub-60 second 400 meter dash."

Meghan Little presents Sweet Potato Salad posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This delicious Sweet Potato Salad is simply fail-safe - it can even be made the night before a big get-together! Pair it with our BBQ and Coleslaw for a delicious summer meal at www.paleoeffect.com."

Dr. John presents Becoming Paleo, Part 4: The Projections of Anxiety posted at Paleoterran, saying, "In this part of his series on overcoming his poor-eating habits and switching to the Paleo Diet, John Michael discusses in detail the projections of anxiety that drove him to eat industrial foods, and his discovery of the repressed health instinct that was animating them."

Nell Stephenson presents Paleo 4th of July posted at TrainWithNellie.

Sara Bukowski presents Eating Healthy: Meal Plans for the week of July 3rd posted at Healthy Meal Plans.

Robin S. presents No One Told Me That posted at Confessions of a Paleolithic Drama Queen, saying, "A humorous look at some of the more...unexpected...changes a paleo lifestyle may bring."

Tony Federico presents Primal Living on the American Plains posted at FED - Fitness in an Evolutionary Direction, saying, "The buffalo was the center of existence for the Comanche and it provided for all of their needs."

DebB presents 17 Minute Chicken Recipe posted at Increase Metabolism & Live Healthy, saying, "We all know "shake n' bake" but what about the healthier version "shake n' grill"!?"

Laurie Donaldson presents Zucchini Chips or How I Conquered My Zucchini Overload posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "How to handle large amounts of zucchini..."

Lauren presents Video- how to brew fizzy kombucha posted at Raspberry & Coconut, saying, "Learn how to brew your own kombucha at home!"

Patty Strilaeff presents Salmon with Blueberry Basil Salsa posted at following my nose..., saying, "A recipe and blue things from the garden!"

Megh presents Caramelized Onion Crisps posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "These things are almost better than candy, or cookies!"

Megh presents Dr. Raspberry, or how I learned to stop worrying and love fructose posted at Yolks, Kefir, and Gristle, saying, "'nuf said."

Kerri Heffel presents sesame and ginger grilled tuna steaks posted at the functional foodie, saying, "A quick and easy marinade for tuna steaks this summer!"

Paul Jaminet presents Serum Cholesterol Among African Hunter-Gatherers posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Part 2 in a series checking out the claims of S Boyd Eaton and Loren Cordain that hunter-gatherers had very low serum cholesterol, and that this was healthy."

Amy Kubal presents Hello??? Anyone Out There??? posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Just when you thought I'd disappeared..."

Christian Wernstedt presents From My Sketchbook: Why Being "Free of Symptoms" is not Enough. posted at The VitalObjectives Blog, saying, "I discuss why persistent symptoms is the last sign to appear when a person's health has begun to go downhill, and hence why people who want to optimize health should view any sort of symptom more seriously."

Kara presents Blended Coffee Drink Recipe posted at The Primal Home.

Melissa "Melicious" Joulwan presents The Surprise of Grilled Okra posted at theclothesmakethegirl, saying, "I've never been a fan of okra, but since I charred it on the grill, I can't get enough."

Tara Grant presents Conventional Wisdom Conundrum posted at Primal Living, saying, "I need your help. I need to pass the NASM exam but am having problems with all the CW being thrown at me. How do I re-learn things that are wrong in order to pass a test that is arbitrary at best?!"

Peggy Emch presents An Unconventional Approach to PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Depression, acne, and a host of other symptoms are often a result of insulin resistance which can lead to PCOS. Sometimes the Primal diet is not enough to combat symptoms. I had to go to some pretty extreme measures to fight this condition."

Paleo Parents presents How just doing it can create some INCREDIBLE test results posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "How paleo helped solve so many health concerns."

Robin presents Traveling Paleo: Eating Well On the Road posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "Nasty white-flour-laden hotel breakfasts can't derail a paleo eater if you get creative. Strategies for staying healthy on the road."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: SuperSlow / Body By Science

By Diana Hsieh

feel my muscles

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" is:
Do you do Body by Science or SuperSlow workouts? If so, what do you like most and least about them? How long have you been doing them? Do you do them with a trainer? What have your results been?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming question of the week, please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com

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