Saturday, April 30, 2011

The Objectivist Roundup & Rationally Selfish Webcast

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

Objectivism is Ayn Rand's philosophy of this-worldly reason, egoism, and capitalism. Ayn Rand is best known as the author of the epic novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. As she explained:

My philosophy, in essence, is the concept of man as a heroic being, with his own happiness as the moral purpose of his life, with productive achievement as his noblest activity, and reason as his only absolute. ("About the Author," Atlas Shrugged)
So where can you find some fresh readings from an Objectivist perspective on the web?

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

John J McVey hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast.

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

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Friday, April 29, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #058

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Sara Hatch presents Zucchini Beef Saute with Guacamole posted at Edible.

Arsy Vartanian presents {field day} posted at 30 days of paleo.

Tyler presents Real Food 7: Meatza posted at Evolutionary Health Systems, saying, "If you haven't had Meatza yet, it's time for a kitchen adventure. Delicious, nutritious, and done in 20 minutes..."

Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Endangered Species 72% Cranberries and Almonds posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "Good pairing, but poor execution."

Kris presents How many carbs per day to lose weight posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "If you are wondering how many carbs per day to lose weight, or just to live a generally healthy lifestyle, then enter here to find your answer."

Whitney presents Dentists support Paleo and Primal diets? posted at The Paleo Child, saying, ""After the exam, our dentist said to use water in sippy cups and avoid carbohydrate-heavy foods as well as sugary foods to protect the teeth best.""

Meghan Little / Angel Torres presents Paleo Cobb Salad posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "A terrific Paleo Cobb Salad by Paleo Effect (Sync your life at the Speed of nature)"

Meghan Little presents Paleo Flan posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "I can't believe it's not dairy! 5 minute prep, easy as 123, Paleo Flan. The perfect dessert for the Paleo lifestyle."

Amy Kubal presents Drop The Remote! posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Tune In to "Tune Out"!!"

Nell Stephenson presents Ensalata Caprese Deconstructed posted at TrainWithNellie.

Kate Yoak presents Cooking oils posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "Digging into various properties of oils, most importantly smoke points, I worked out the best options for high-heat cooking."

Logan Marshall presents 3 Steps to Lion Proof Abs posted at Wild Movement.

Ryan presents Paleo Diet in the Chicago Redeye posted at The Urban Cave - Chicago, saying, "If you're like us, you get excited to see paleo make news. Especially when most of the article is positive (goofy caveman images aside)."

Julia Campbell presents coliflor a la plancha with chorizo posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "A super easy Spanish dinner with chorizo, pan fried cauliflower, golden raisins, and pimentón de la vera."

Angie presents Bacon Wrapped Scallops posted at Angie's Suburban Oasis, saying, "This is a recipe post for Bacon Wrapped Scallops and Zuccini and Leeks sauteed in bacon grease."

Yael Grauer presents Whole30 Recap: 7 Revelations At The Midway Point posted at Yael Writes, saying, "7 epiphanies I've had or things I've learned halfway through 30 days of strict Paleo."

J. Stanton presents The Science Behind The "Low Carb Flu", and How To Regain Your Metabolic Flexibility posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, "Why does it take time to adjust to a low-carb diet, and how can we make that adjustment process less painful? Here's the science."

Laurie Donaldson presents Royal Chicken Tenders... posted at Food for Primal Thought.

Stacy Toth presents Behavioral Eating: How Paleo makes my child the 'favorite' in class posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "A discussion on the changes in behavior in children that occur while eating the Paleo way."

Todd Dosenberry presents 3 Primal Smoothie Recipes posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "I am sharing 3 primal/paleo smoothie recipes with you today! One is outrageously simple and very tasty. Another is FULL of nutrition due to the spinach and cacao. The third one was submitted by a fan of my site.

Enjoy!"

Paul Jaminet presents Omega-3 Fats, Angiogenesis, and Cancer: Part I posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post starts a two-part series on emerging evidence that omega-3 fats under oxidative stress promote cancer - evidence that might be significant for Paleo dieters who supplement fish oil or are not careful about their antioxidant minerals."

Dr. John presents Inflammation impairs frontal lobe brain function posted at Paleoterran, saying, "The standard American diet gets to your brain."

Kerri Heffel presents crockpot beef stew posted at the functional foodie, saying, "This is the easiest crock-pot beef stew ever!"

Ana Johnson presents King Corn: A Review posted at Whole Life Diets, Autoimmune diet, Registered Dietitian, Paleo, saying, "A review of the movie King Corn."

Primal Kitchen's Family Grokumentarian presents Paleo / Primal Shortcuts: Knowing Your Strengths, While Learning from Others posted at Primal Kitchen: A Family Grokumentary, saying, "When I first dove into the primal lifestyle last June, I put lots of pressure on myself to tackle the whole spectrum of paleo eating styles right away: acquiring lots of high quality fats, baking paleo goodies, sourcing higher quality foods, and so on. I guess that I thought that it was an all-or-nothing venture! But soon I learned that it was folly to let the perfect be the enemy of the good."

Tim Huntley presents Reflections on My CrossFit Boot Camp Experience posted at Soil to Sustenance, saying, "Observations from one month of CrossFit boot camp."

Emily presents Use What Your Grocer Gave Ya posted at Girl meats Paleo, saying, "A fast & easy veggie side dish consisting of carrots and fennel; quite yummy and great with leftover Easter ham."

Dustin Baxley presents eating and other stuff.: 5 Must-Have Ingredients to 'Paleo-ize' Your Meals posted at eating and other stuff., saying, "Pick up these staple ingredients to jazz up those Paleo recipes!"

NJ Paleo Girl presents Paleo Pulled Pork and a feast fit for a king! posted at NJ Paleo Girl, saying, "This Tuesday I loaded up my Crock Pot with a big ole' pig shoulder, set it, and forgot it! When I got home 9 hours later my kitchen smelled delicious, and my poor pup was salivating. This meal is easy to make, and although may take some time in the beginning, it'll make you enough to eat all week!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Beauty Products

By Diana Hsieh

CONFUSED

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" was submitted to Google Moderator by me:
Do you use standard beauty products or something else?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming week or vote on questions submitted by others, go check out the Google Moderator session. We're running low on questions, so please submit any that you think might be interesting to hear other people's responses.

Read more...

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Chocolate Review: New Tree's 73% Mint

By Benjamin Skipper

New Tree is a brand I've spoken about multiple times throughout my reviews, but have been abstaining from reviewing since it's pretty expensive. Well, I finally took to saving up my money and bought a mountain of them in bulk, saving me about $30 for 24 bars. Now I can finally review them! Naturally, my first choice is New Tree's 73% cocoa mint, which also has green tea extract in it for additional health benefits.

It did not quite live up to the memory I had of it, but it's still nice. It has a hot aroma of ginger spice and tea with milk, and flavor-wise it's dominated by peppermint with a bitter grassy undertone, probably the tea. The cocoa itself blends far too well into the experience, making itself almost invisible and therefore impossible to ascertain the nature of. Each bite brings a quiet snap and an uneven melt, crumbling at first to every chew and turning into a goo pretty slowly.

The bar is deep brown, almost to the point of being black, and offers a dull snap and shine, the latter attribute being so evenly reflective that the whole bar turns nearly entirely white at any light source. On the back I noticed a imperfection or two in the form of a hole being in the chocolate, as if it bubbled and popped, and the shine takes on an almost uniform grid pattern. The decorative design is among the best I've seen. On each square is not only the New Tree brand written in its signature font, but also a subtle imprint of the bellyside veins of a leaf. It's so slight that I'm impressed that such an imprint could be done so cleanly and precisely, and it makes the bar *very* attractive. New Tree definitely has one of the best looking bars out there.

The packaging is practical, but definitely needs some work. Each bar comes inside a cardboard casing that makes the bar much more sturdier and less prone to breaking when handling in the store, but the inner wrapper negates such insurance. Unlike other common practices, this wrapper is stronger and entirely sealed, much in difference to those other bars that use a thin foil that can easily be unfolded or partially ripped. The strength of the wrapper makes it virtually impossible to open the chocolate without breaking the bar, and I've yet to not break one. I think the smaller New Tree bars are wrapped differently, as I do not remember at all this being the case when I first tried it. To fully admire the aesthetics it's be nice if the bar opened up in one piece! I do at least like the bright white background of the cardboard, as it's very striking to the eyes; it certainly caught mine the first time I saw it on shelves.

The reason why I was attracted to this particular version is not only because I love mint, but also because they use peppermint, which is stronger than the plain mint extracts that are more common. I expected a much more intense experience, but I guess I mistakenly mixed up peppermint with peppermint oil, the latter of which may be stronger since it's a concentrated liquid essence. In my tasting I found that the intensity of the mint was no stronger than that of Endangered Species' own, and this came at the sacrifice of drowning out the chocolate. I want my mint to be as powerful as it can possibly be made, and this certainly falls short. Endangered Species not only delivers the mint, but also holds up the chocolate as well. Endangered Species is cheaper too.

This variety, at least, is enjoyable and worth recommending, but my search for more intense mint continues. I want that nose chilling, brain icing sensation to overwhelm me.

Read more...

coliflor a la plancha with chorizo

By Julie

Wondering where I've been the past week? Well, I was visiting my friend Samantha in Boston, and eating my body weight in food everyday. I miss that place a whole heck of a lot and it was really fun to go to my old favorite restaurants and jealously try out wonderful, new places. The weather was suitably crappy. Really windy, mostly cold and then rainy as the week progressed. The sun was out just a couple days. I would say that it made it easier to leave, but when my friend and I came back to Denver to finish the vacation, the weather was nearly identical here! Ugh.


Among the wonderful meals at The Abbey, Orinoco, Hungry Mother, Zaftigs, and too many others, the most delicious (as always) was at Toro. It's a Spanish tapas place in the South End that goes far, far beyond the typical. Yes, you can get patatas bravas and tortilla española, and they're wonderful there, but you can also get more unusual dishes. Some of the dishes we got were mollejas (sweetbreads with a blood orange sauce), corizon a la plancha (beef heart), and estufada de tripa (an unexpected southeast asian-inspired tripe stew). We also got an unassuming little dish of coliflor a la plancha. We always get it; it's not super fancy or complicated, but it's so yummy. "A la plancha" means grilled on a metal plate, basically. So you get a nice, crisp outside to whatever you're cooking. I've roasted cauliflower a whole bunch, but this is slightly different. The cauliflower is cut nice and thin so it cooks through faster, allowing you to get that browning, but also to have it be really tender.

After my friend came back to Denver, we continued our gluttony, eating at Biker Jim's new brick and mortar outpost, Cherry Cricket (we felt like we had to after watching Man vs. Food), and the stupid hip, but really good Lola. Now that the vacation is over, it's time to go back to normal eating. But I was feeling sad that Samantha and I don't live in the same city and still a bit homesick for Boston, so I thought that I'd recreate something that I ate there. I really wanted to try making the cauliflower dish from Toro (also, I'm not really sure where to get sweetbreads here?). I think I did a pretty good job. I changed it up a bit, but overall it has the same effect.

First, I added chorizo to this dish. It makes it a complete meal, rather than just a tapa. I also used grape tomatoes in my recipe, but I'm not going to put it in here. It's just not tomato season yet and they weren't terribly good in this. At Toro, there were toasted pine nuts in the dish, but they were SO expensive at two different stores I checked. $30/pound is ridiculous. I didn't check at Whole Foods, but the last time I bought them there, they were more like $13/pound. Anyway, I just used roasted almonds. I would encourage you to get pine nuts if they're not $30/pound, because they're super good. Just toast them in a dry pan until they're a little browned.

coliflor a la plancha with chorizo

1 pound of chorizo, casings removed if you can't find bulk chorizo
2 heads cauliflower, cored, quartered, and sliced into 1/2-inch thick slices
olive oil
1/2 cup golden raisins
1 teaspoon pimentón de la vera (smoked paprika)
sea salt
roasted almonds, coarsely chopped
parsley, leaves and small stems chopped

1. Heat about 1/2 tablespoon olive oil in a large cast iron pan over medium high heat. Add chorizo and break up into 1-inch chunks. Cook for about 7 minutes and then flip them over and around to brown the other sides. Cook another 7 minutes. Cut into the biggest chunk to make sure it's cooked through, then scoop out the sausage and add to a bowl. Cover to keep warm.

2. In the oil that's leftover in the pan, add the cauliflower, raisins, pimentón de la vera, and some salt. You may have to do this in two batches. You want about a single layer of cauliflower and don't want to crowd the pan. Cook cauliflower, covered, for about 10 minutes. Halfway through, flip it to brown the other side. If you're doing two batches, sprinkle a little more pimentón de la vera and salt on the second round of cauliflower. You can always add more to taste afterward.

3. Add cauliflower to chorizo and toss to mix. Adjust seasoning to taste. If you feel the chorizo should be warmer, you can toss just it or the whole mixture back on the pan and crisp it up a bit. Serve with chopped nuts and parsley. Drizzle a little olive oil on top as well.

If you live in Boston, you can go to Toro instead of making this! But, if not, have fun cooking!

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Sunday, April 24, 2011

Hsieh PJM OpEd on Rationing and IPAB

By Paul Hsieh

The 4/22/2011 edition of PajamasMedia published my latest health care OpEd, "We Call It 'Rationing,' Obama Calls It 'Medicare Independent Payment Advisory Board'".

The basic theme is that we shouldn't let either Obama's IPAB or Congress control our health care.

Here is an excerpt:

Suppose Congress asked Americans: which government officials should decide what foods you would be allowed to eat and what prices you had to pay at the grocery store -- Congress, or an unelected board of nutritional experts appointed by the president?

Most Americans would immediately reply, "Neither!" But that's precisely the debate between Congress and the White House regarding President Obama’s proposed Medicare Independent Payment Advisory Board...

Although the Obama administration stated that the IPAB would not ration medical care, its power to set payments to doctors and hospitals would give it de facto rationing power.

If the IPAB sets the reimbursement rate for services below the cost of providing it, then hospitals and doctors could no longer afford to offer such services -- even if the services are medically best for their patients. Life-saving medical procedures we currently take for granted, such as PET scans to detect early cancers or minimally invasive methods to safely open up blocked vital blood vessels without risky surgery, might no longer be available. Although those services might still theoretically be "covered" by Medicare, in practice doctors would no longer offer them, and their patients would no longer be able to receive them...
(Read the full text of "We Call It 'Rationing,' Obama Calls It 'Medicare Independent Payment Advisory Board'".)

Americans would never stand for the following false alternative: "Who should decide what foods you are allowed to eat—a panel of unelected bureaucrats or your elected Congressmen?"

We should similarly reject the same false alternative for our health care.

(PJM lightly edited my piece and changed the title, but left the basic meaning intact.)

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Saturday, April 23, 2011

Objectivist Tidbit: Character

By Diana Hsieh

Ayn Rand on the crucial importance of a person's character to his life, from “The Goal of My Writing,” in The Romantic Manifesto:

Just as man’s physical survival depends on his own effort, so does his psychological survival. Man faces two corollary, interdependent fields of action in which a constant exercise of choice and a constant creative process are demanded of him: the world around him and his own soul (by “soul,” I mean his consciousness). Just as he has to produce the material values he needs to sustain his life, so he has to acquire the values of character that enable him to sustain it and that make his life worth living. He is born without the knowledge of either. He has to discover both—and translate them into reality—and survive by shaping the world and himself in the image of his values.
What character traits have you deliberately cultivated in the course of switching to a paleo diet -- and why?

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Objectivist Roundup & Rationally Selfish Webcast

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

Reepicheep's Coracle hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast. Here are the questions that I'll answer this week:

  • Question 1: How do you objectively define manners? Is that even possible? What makes some action rude or polite? Is it purely subjective or based on personal values? For example, some people think that guests ought to take off their shoes in another person's house, while others don't care or even prefer shoes to remain on the feet. And some people think that putting elbows on the dinner table or feet on the coffee table is barbaric, while others regard that as fine. Since manners vary from person to person, how do you "mind your manners" when interacting with other people? Or should you not bother with that, and instead do what you please?
  • Question 2: Is it rationally selfish to be brutally honest in some contexts? Often, you need to tell a person some hard truth, and you can do so either tactfully or brutally. In many instances, you might want to be brutally honest because you fear that the person will not understand what you say if you're tactful. So which approach is better?
  • Question 3: Why is receiving the counsel of an attorney a right while receiving health care is not? In both cases, you would receive something that you need for free from the state. So what's the difference, if any? Why should a repeat offender have access to free legal counsel at taxpayer expense while an innocent, law-abiding sick person shouldn't receive life-saving medication or treatment at taxpayer expense? In the former case, the criminal might lose his liberty, but in the latter case the sick person might die. So what I am missing?
  • Question 4: Should a person with a pre-existing medical condition that disqualifies him from most major medical insurance plans sign up for a state-sponsored high-risk insurance pool? I'm a 1099 independent software contractor, and I'm responsible for my own health insurance. I have a pre-existing condition that disqualifies me from most of the major medical insurers. My current insurer offers few benefits, and the company is notorious for trying to deny claims. I was also diagnosed with a malignant tumor in my cheek. That's being treated, but I'll be all the more uninsurable in the future. However, the state where I live has a high-risk insurance pool available. Financially, this plan would be a much better deal than I have with my current insurance company. I would have to pay premiums, deductibles, and co-insurance, so this plan is not complete welfare. However, I'm obviously wary of becoming dependent on the government for such a plan, and I don't want to contribute to the continued socialization of the health-care system. I have some other options, like trying to find a job that offers benefits, but I love my current job. Am I trying to eat my cake and have it too by signing up for the state plan, which would allow me to stay in my current job without the worry of a major medical issue ruining me and my family financially?
  • Question 5: How should one promote Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism? What are some right and wrong ways to do that? What are some good methods and target audiences?
  • Question 6: From Objectivist Answers: Objectivism regards harming yourself or allowing others to harm you is immoral, but how does that apply to sex, particularly sadism and masochism? Should S&M acts be illegal?
If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

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Friday, April 22, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #057

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Dom presents Primal Pancakes (Banana Nut) posted at Primal Running, saying, "A simple and satisfying Paleo/Primal treat"

Tyler presents Evolutionary Nutrition: 3 Ways to Always be Prepared posted at Evolutionary Health Systems, saying, "Failing to prepare is preparing to fail... Especially when it comes to adopting a new behavior like paleo/evolutionary nutrition. Here are 3 top strategies to set yourself up for success."

Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Hageland Costa Rica 71% posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "A nice treat, but that's not a very strong compliment, is it."

Anne presents Going "Grain-Free" One Step At a Time posted at Paleo on a Budget.

Todd Dosenberry presents 10 Paleo Foods to Bring On Airplane For Traveling posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "I had the opportunity to go to Primal Con this year. It was a blast. I am from Michigan and thus had a long plan ride. I don't like the airplane food and its hard to find good food at the airport. When you do its expensive! What do you do? Bring your own food! Read this post to find 10 easily portable foods to bring with you on your next flight. Enjoy!"

Kate Yoak presents Roast your beef posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "There is more than one way to roast your beef! I've learned a few things that help me enjoy beef roasts and today I made the king of them all: eye of round roast using a rather unusual recipe."

Robin presents Seven Paleo Power Breakfasts posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "When breakfast gets too boring, I change it up. Here's a few of my power breakfasts for a great start to the day."

Logan Marshall presents Dancing With Bigfoot posted at Wild Movement.

Dom presents Ultimate Primal Burger posted at Primal Running.

Amy Kubal presents The Candy Jar Conspiracy... posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Watch out for the Candy Jar!!!"

Megh presents Shad Roe posted at Yolks, kefir, and gristle, saying, "I've shared my new favorite "crave" -- Shad Roe! :)"

Kerri Heffel presents pulled pork & homemade paleo BBQ sauce posted at the functional foodie, saying, "The easiest pulled pork and homemade BBQ sauce just in time for Spring!"

Dustin Baxley presents Four Minute Abs posted at eating and other stuff., saying, "For any good Paleo-person, exercise should be part of the routine. Check out a quick, intense way to get your day's worth of sweating in less time than it takes to drink your cup of coffee."

NJ Paleo Girl presents Boosting Beneficial Bacteria posted at NJ Paleo Girl, saying, "As far back as the 1950’s chemical additives began making their way into our foods as a way to extend shelf life and ‘freshness’ of food products. The aim of these processes was to kill off unwanted bad bacteria in the food. However in addition to killing off bad bacteria; these processes also cause the good bacteria that are essential for our health, to die. Read on to see how to boost the beneficial bacteria in your gut!"

Nell Stephenson presents Here We Go Again.. No, Endurance Athletes Do NOT Need Grains! I'll Stay Paleo, Thank You! posted at TrainWithNellie.

J. Stanton presents Extraction Vs. Prosperity, What Are Humans For?, and How To Help Save The Great Migration posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, "The Serengeti is the last intact savanna ecosystem on Earth...and it's about to be destroyed. Find out what you can do to help save the place that literally made us human."

Kris presents Ketogenic Diet Menu posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "The basic principles of the ketogenic eating plan and what to watch out for, along with a sample ketogenic diet menu for a day."

Paul Jaminet presents How to Raise HDL posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post concludes a series on HDL with practical tips for how to raise HDL, and analysis of some ways you shouldn't raise HDL."

Emily presents Smoothie RX posted at Girl meats Paleo, saying, "It's warming up, time to break out the blenders! Cool down with this smoothie full of protein, good fat and happy carbs."

Tara Grant presents Body Image: When You've Met Your Goal But You Still Feel Fat posted at Primal Living, saying, "So many people are concerned with reaching their health and fitness goals that not many of them stop to think: what actually happens when you DO reach that goal?"

Ute presents What's Paleo? posted at Such Lovely Freckles.

Ana Johnson presents Paleo and Cholesterol posted at Whole Life Diets, Autoimmune diet, Registered Dietitian, Paleo, saying, "Paleo diet and cholesterol results"

Ryan presents Ch-Ch-Ch-Chia Seeds Review posted at The Urban Cave - Chicago, saying, "My take on chia seeds."

Tim Huntley presents Farm Happenings posted at Soil to Sustenance.

Patty Strilaeff presents Chowstalker's Evil Twin Sister... posted at following my nose..., saying, "A website for Paleo/Primal treats!"

Peggy Emch presents Another Sweet Holiday posted at The Primal Parent, saying, "Holidays are tough for parents because they are all about sweets. We replace commercial candies with some healthier alternatives..."

Beth Mazur presents Our Western diet: Prescription for disaster? posted at Weight Maven, saying, "does a high fat/high carb diet have something in comment with smoking pot?"

Pepper Ruper presents Eating Paleo in Taiwan Food Porn, 2/6,000,000 posted at Paleo Pepper.
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Supplements

By Diana Hsieh

Vitamins!

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" was submitted to Google Moderator by Katherine:
Do you take supplements? If so, which ones and why?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming week or vote on questions submitted by others, go check out the Google Moderator session. (We're running a bit low on questions, so please submit any that you think might be interesting!)

Read more...

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

salmon with creamy roasted poblano sauce

By Julie

This is another one of those "I can't wait to grill!" dinners that got thwarted. I woke up on Sunday morning with a warm breeze blowing through the bedroom window. Saturday had been about 80 degrees. Sunday progressed a beautiful day until around 11:30am when the wind started howling and black clouds started rushing in from the mountains. Then it rained. Then it wintry mixed. Then it snowed. And I lost my interest in grilling. But that's okay, because heck, baked salmon is nothing to sniff at. And even if it was, this sauce is so subtle and delicious, it wouldn't matter.


If you've never roasted your own peppers before, now's a great time to try it. It's incredibly easy. I'm not sure it's always cost effective - sometimes fresh red peppers are really expensive and a jar of marinated roasted red peppers might be cheaper. But you can roast all kinds of peppers! The roasted poblano peppers here make a wonderful, rich base for this creamy sauce. You can roast them a few different ways. If you have a gas stove, you can do it right on that burner flame. If, like me, you have an electric stove (something I used to think would be the death of me if I ever got stuck with one, but now am quite ambivalent about), then the broiler is the way to go. I chose to not put my oven rack in the closest position to the broiler. That way I got the peppers charred, but at a little bit slower time, so the peppers were more roasted through.

You can use other peppers if you'd like - Anaheim or red bell or a combination. I also think next time I'll roast a jalapeño to give the sauce a kick. And I might add in cilantro, because I love it. For the fish, I used a small side of salmon. It was on sale. Fillets will obviously work. Snapper and halibut would be great options too (or shrimp, chicken, pork...). For the vegetables, you can use pretty much anything. I think spinach, asparagus, or peppers would be perfect.

salmon with creamy roasted poblano sauce
adapted from Rick Bayless, serves 4

poblano sauce
2 poblano peppers (sometimes also labeled pasilla peppers)
3 garlic cloves, peeled and halved lengthwise
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
2 tablespoons olive oil

2 zucchini and 2 yellow summer squash, cut on the diagonal into 1/2-inch pieces.
1 1-pound side of salmon

1. Preheat broiler. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place peppers on it. Broil for about 15 minutes, turning once. Place peppers in a bowl and cover with a dish towel. Let cool.

2. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and cook 3 to 4 minutes, stirring frequently, until browned. Be careful not to let the garlic get too brown - it can happen really quickly. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the garlic to a blender. Set pan aside.

3. Once the peppers are cool, remove them from the bowl and peel the skin off. Rip out the stems and discard the seeds. Give them a rinse to wash off any stuck on seeds and pieces of skin. Coarsely chop and add peppers, along with cream and milk, to the blender and process until smooth.

4. Reheat the leftover oil in the sauté pan over medium high heat. Add the squash and cook until starting to brown, but still crisp-tender. About 7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

5. Preheat the over to 400 degrees. While the vegetables are cooking, reline the same baking sheet you used for the peppers with parchment paper. Drizzle some oil on the parchment and place the fish on it. Drizzle more oil on top of the fish and generously season with coarse sea salt and fresh ground pepper. Bake in the oven for about 6 minutes, until the fish flakes (internal temperature should be 155 degrees). The cooking time will vary depending on the size of the side of salmon you get, or if you do fillets. Just be sure not to over cook.

6. While the fish is cooking, add the pepper sauce to the squash and simmer until thickened slightly. Season with salt and pepper.

Serve the fish with a generous ladle of the sauce and vegetables. Top with cilantro as well.

Here's my little helper kitty, Pan. He's a real baddy.



This was originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Chocolate Review: Ghirardelli's 86% Midnight Reverie

By Benjamin Skipper

Ghirardelli's 86% Midnight Reverie is a chocolate I've been long in getting to. Time to throw out another worthy competitor to the likes of Lindt and Green & Black's, no? (Though, I do believe Ghirardelli is owned by Lindt.) I've been especially intrigued in this since some of my friends have been enjoying this particular one, and I always have an incredible curiosity for whatever good sweets my friends are eating. Say you're eating chocolate and you'll know what question I have.

The packaging is very fitting for a dark chocolate bar: black as midnight, just as advertised. The front is very simple with its nightly colors, rigid text, and portrait of chocolate pieces. I feel somewhat prejudiced towards liking Ghirardelli's bird mascot, for birds are my favorite animals, eagles being one of them. On the back is a silver contrast that reminds me of the stars at night, and the space is filled with flavor descriptions, tasting notes, and an extremely basic overview of the chocolate making process, the last being oversimplified and perhaps not worth including. I like informational reading with my chocolate; can't learn enough about it. The tasting notes promise a crisp snap and a taste of roasted flavors with hints of the red fruits cherries and plums. We'll see.

My own sensation is that the dominant attribute is that of a sort of roasty smokiness. Vanilla plays a subtle role, but is strong enough to surely stand out on its own. Red fruit seems to be too specific an identification, but there is a tart attribute reminiscent of tart fruit in general, which cherries and plums could certainly be a part of, but not be the first members to come to mind. Most of the experience is subsumed by the smoke and roast attributes, especially emphasized in the aftertaste inherent on the breath, and the fruitiness becomes most noticeable on the backmost sides of the tongue. The aftertaste on the breath might linger, but in the mouth the memory easily departs.

Each bite has a slightly viscous melt. It does indeed deliver on the crisp snap, and the melt comes at a moderately decent pace, transforming somewhere between a thin goo and a cacao butter. Ah, it can easily coat your entire mouth. Be sure to let it.

Appearance-wise the bar mimics the packaging quite well. It's black as midnight in its flesh, but given the right lighting source the dull shine makes it look as if the moon were glowing on it, beckoning to the back of the box. Each square is mathematically precise in its shape and textured symbol of the Ghirardelli medallion (I always love those signatures), and the back, while of the same tone as the front, has a odd sort of blobby and spotty shine. Inwardly the gradient is almost absolutely smooth, explaining the even melt.

More fruit makes itself apparent in the aroma, though oddly ones that don't really make an appearance in the bar. I am impressed dominantly with cocoa and raisins, and more generally with that of dried acidic fruit. Berries? Whatever the case, the raisins stick to the scent and delegate the flavor roles to other fruits.

A very important question to ask at this point is: How does it stack up to its competitors? So far I've reviewed Lindt's 90% (I'm skipping the 85% review), Green & Black's 85%, Chocolove's 77%, and Endangered Species' 88%. Most importantly, the flavors showcased in this variety, in order of increasing intensity, are tart fruits, vanilla, roastiness, and smoke. Few, if any, of the others contains this array of attributes, making Ghirardelli a unique contribution. Lindt and G&B's emphasizes sugary cocoa and a deliciously strong and boozy vanilla note; Lindt is the economical choice, but I favor G&B's for its density and heavenly mouthfeel. Endangered Species' very strongly emphasizes the bitterness of the cocoa and has no noticeable vanilla hit, which I don't like since I'd rather just go for a 100% cacao baking bar if I wanted bitterness. Chocolove is just too mild to give much of an impression of anything, so I wouldn't even consider it.

Quality-wise, I'd say this comes down to a choice between Ghirardelli, Lindt, and G&B's. Ghirardelli has the roast, smoke, and fruit whereas Lindt and G&B's has the intense vanilla and sugary cocoa. Between Lindt and G&B's, G&B's has an incredibly greater mouthfeel. My choice would be to have both the Ghirardelli and Green & Black's bar, as in one mood I could go for fruit and smoke and in another for vanilla drinks and a velvety mouthfeel. The world can be made grander with more choices.

In the end, I regret holding off on reviewing this variety; its merit has been too neglected. It has a thin, buttery mouthfeel; a complex orchestra between strong savory impressions and quietly sweet supporters, and a smell that harks back to childhood boxes of raisins. Certainly it's worth the eat.

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Monday, April 18, 2011

pork chops with cherry rhubarb chutney + mustard greens + herbed roasted sweet potatoes

By Julie

You probably think I have an obsession with sweet potatoes. I think I might have an obsession with sweet potatoes. I almost didn't include them in the recipe because I'm getting embarrassed with how often I post them. I swear I don't eat them every day. But this recipe isn't about the sweet potatoes. It's about pork chops and delicious chutney, and mustard greens too. It's getting to be warm and spring like and rhubarb is one of those quintessential early spring vegetables, along with asparagus and peas. I might have jumped the gun a bit on rhubarb here - the stuff I found at my grocery store didn't look the best and it was stupid expensive. Still, I got it in my head to use rhubarb because I want it to be spring and $6.99 per pound be damned.


I had a wonderful, lazy Sunday late afternoon making this dinner. I did all my prepping and took my time with making the chutney and took lots of stress-free pictures. That is, until America's Next Great Restaurant came on. I had tried to time everything so I could watch that stupid show while eating, but it didn't work. So now you know about my dedication to not only Biggest Loser, but another NBC product placement-laden television show. I like food and I like exercising and I like shows that revolve around them. And I don't like waiting until the following day and watching it on my computer. I like to watch it on TV. It's like I'm 65.

So mustard greens. Typically kale is my go-to leafy green vegetable. I also really like to make collard greens, and of course spinach... oh and swiss chard. But mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion greens, beet greens - I kind of forget about them. Which is terrible! They're wonderful! Mustard greens are nice and bitter and spicy. They're great here with a bunch of garlic and generous squeezes of lemon juice. Simple and easy.

The chutney here is pretty flexible. If you don't want to use rhubarb, substitute a granny smith apple. If you don't have cherries but have a bunch of raisins in the pantry, use those. You can use some ground ginger for the fresh stuff. Sherry vinegar for balsamic. You get the idea. It's just a lightly spiced, vinegared, savory/sweet fruit mixture.


pork chops with rhubarb cherry chutney
adapted from Martha Stewart, serves 4

Some helpful hints - you can make the chutney first and just set it aside, or far in advance. It should be warm or room temperature when you serve it. The greens can be made while the sweet potatoes are roasting and just covered to keep warm. Cook the pork last and time it so it's finished when the sweet potatoes come out of the oven or thereabouts.

cherry rhubarb chutney
1/2 cup dried cherries
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup finely chopped onion, about 1/2 a small onion
1/2 inch knob of ginger, minced, about 1/2 tablespoon
8 to 10 ounces rhubarb, cut crosswise into 1/3 - 1/2 inch pieces
pinch of ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground mustard

1. In a small bowl, mix the cherries with the vinegar and about 1/4 cup hot water. Let sit for about 10 minutes, until softened.

2. Heat oil in a small pan over medium low heat. Add onions and ginger, and sauté for 10 minutes.

3. Add rhubarb and cherry mixture. Simmer until rhubarb has softened, about 8 minutes. Stir in nutmeg and mustard.

herbed roasted sweet potatoes
3 medium sweet potatoes, cut into 1 1/2-inch rounds, cutting any larger diameter pieces in half crosswise
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves, or about 1/2 tablespoon or so dried
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl, toss sweet potatoes with remainder of ingredients. I find it helpful to fit the large bowl with a slightly smaller one on top and shake.

2. Arrange sweet potatoes in a 9x13 inch Pyrex dish, or rimmed baking sheet. Roast until tender and browned, about 60 minutes.

mustard greens
3 tablespoons butter
2 bunches mustard greens
1 medium onion (or other half of onion from the chutney), chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
coarse sea salt and pepper
fresh lemon juice

1. In a large, heavy sauté pan, heat butter over medium-high heat. Add onion and sauté until translucent and beginning to brown, about 6 minutes. Add garlic and sauté for about 2 minutes more, making sure garlic doesn't burn.

2. Add mustard greens in stages, adding the next amount after the first has wilted and made room in the pan. Once all greens are wilted, remove from heat and toss with lemon juice.

pork chops
4 boneless pork loin chops, about 3/4 inch thick (we cut ours from a loin roast)
coarse sea salt and pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil or bacon fat

1. Generously season pork chops with salt and pepper.

2. Heat oil in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add pork chops, doing it in stages if necessary to avoid crowding.

3. Cook chops for about 5 minutes per side, depending on thickness. Internal thermometer should read 155 degrees.

Serve the pork chops with a big spoonful of chutney on top and then put some greens and sweet potato on the side. Delicious!

This was originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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Sunday, April 17, 2011

Hsieh OpEd: The Homer Simpson Approach to Social Security

By Paul Hsieh

The April 12, 2011 edition of PajamasMedia published my latest OpEd, "The Homer Simpson Approach to Social Security".

My theme is that the economic and moral bankruptcy of Social Security is becoming increasingly obvious to all. And that the proper question is not how to "reform" it, but rather how to phase out and eventually eliminate Social Security.

Here is the opening:

In a classic episode of The Simpsons, a hungry Homer Simpson runs out of donuts and breaks into his emergency stash. But when he opens the box, it's empty except for a note that reads: "Dear Homer, IOU one emergency donut. Signed, Homer." Homer curses his earlier self: "Bastard! He's always one step ahead."

It's easy to laugh at Homer Simpson's folly, but America is doing the same thing with Social Security financing, and the end result won't be amusing...
(Read the full text of "The Homer Simpson Approach to Social Security".)

I'd also like to thank Tony Donadio and Milton Wolf for their earlier blog posts that helped inspire this piece. In particular, I recommend reading Tony's piece in its entirety:
Tony Donadio, "On Eliminating Social Security"

Milton Wolf, "The United States of Greece: The Welfare State's Death Spiral"

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Friday, April 15, 2011

Objectivist Roundup & Rationally Selfish Webcast

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I wanted to announce that I'm going to be discussing "The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly" in the new Atlas Shrugged, Part 1 movie in my live Rationally Selfish Webcast tomorrow (Sunday) at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You don't need to register to join, just go to www.RationallySelfish.com. Here are the questions that I'm scheduled to answer, although I've got so much to say about the movie that some might be deferred until next week:

  • Question 1: What did you think of the movie Atlas Shrugged, Part 1?
  • Question 2: Is it morally wrong to be a free rider? Some people say that it's wrong to be a free rider -- for example, by sneaking into a movie without paying for it, using a gas station bathroom without buying anything, accepting a ride to the airport but refusing to return the favor, hiking on trails in your community without helping to maintain them, or enjoying the Christmas lights of your neighbors without putting up your own. In such cases, you seem to be enjoying a benefit from someone else that you've not paid for or earned. Isn't that unjust, and hence, morally wrong?
  • Question 3: Is it immoral to browse a store with no intention of buying there? Is it immoral to take advantage of the freedom to look through books in a bookstore, or to try out a laptop in a shop, with no intention to actually buying it in that shop? For instance, you check out a book in the shop to decide whether you want to buy it, knowing that if you buy it, you'll do so from Amazon instead. Is that wrong?
  • Question 4: Should age matter in romance? Is it in your rational best interest to date someone who is significantly older or younger than you? Assuming that both individuals are mature, is there anything wrong with an 18 year old dating someone who is 38? Or a 40 year old dating someone who is 60? Or a 70 year old dating someone in their 20s? Does age matter?
  • Question 5: Do I have any responsibility towards my younger brother? My parents constantly ask me to help my brother with his studies, homework, etc, and look after him when they're out and do things for him at the expense of my own studies and time. But I don't find any value in helping my brother. Should I refuse to help my parents in this way?
  • Question 6: From Objectivist Answers: How do you validate free will? For example, if a man is hungry and he values his life, then wouldn't his eating be predetermined?
If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

Also, The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health. Erosophia hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

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The Paleo Rodeo #056

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Stephen (Aegis) presents MSG... Excitotoxicity, yeah its as bad as it sounds. posted at Live Smarter, Not Harder!, saying, "Spefics on why diet soda and processed goods should be 100% avoided."

Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Vivani's 70% Orange posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "Another good orange infusion. Good aroma, assertive flavors, and a steady experience that allows all aspects to get fair attention."

Tyler presents Food Sovereignty Part 1: Freedom and Responsibility posted at Evolutionary Health Systems, saying, "Is new food regulation going to be cramping the paleo style? The first part of this series on food sovereignty looks at some of the underlying issues in food freedom."

Anne presents 5 Ways to Save Money on Meat posted at Paleo on a Budget.

Kate Yoak presents Paleo for kids posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "Having found a good balance for eating Paleo myself, I am now focusing on adjustments needed to make sure my kids are eating an appropriate balance for their age."

Kate Yoak presents Healthy eating is healthy living posted at Parenting is..., saying, "Do we isolate our children socially, prevent them from the happiness brought about by sweets and treats when we teach them to eat healthy? Today my husband and I have to make a momentous decision for the future."

Beth Mazur presents The dark side of dieting posted at Weight Maven, saying, "I'm done with dieting and going paleo. Here's why!"

Amy Kubal presents Not Your Average "Everyday" Paleo Book... posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "A GREAT resource for feeding your family - PALEO!!!"

Julia Campbell presents yucatecan country style pork ribs with pickled onions posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "A delicious marinaded pork based on a traditional dish from Yucatán, served with easy pickled onions."

Tim Huntley presents Do You Have a Healthy Heart? posted at Soil to Sustenance.

Kerri Heffel presents crustless broccoli & sausage quiche posted at the functional foodie, saying, "here is an easy and delicious recipe that works great for breakfast, lunch or dinner and yields some great leftovers too!"

Peggy Emch presents Persuading Kids to Go Primal - A Dash of Discipline, A Sprinkle of Love posted at The Primal Parent.

Todd Dosenberry presents Terrifying News: School In Chicago Tells Parents Homemade Lunches Are A No-No posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Did you hear about the most recent food news? A Chicago school is BANNING HOMEMADE lunches! I was hoping this was a late April Fools joke. Unfortunately it is not.

I decided to create 2 blog posts around this article. A few quotes stood out to me and I discuss my thoughts on each one. This is a MUST read. Please help me prevent this from happening elsewhere!"

Nell Stephenson presents Mid-Training Snacks for Paleo Endurance Athletes posted at TrainWithNellie.

Kris presents Signs and symptoms of low Vitamin D levels posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "The most common symptoms of low vitamin D levels may not be something you notice since most of them are silent, and you may not know about them until too late"

Megh presents My Grandma's Romertopf: Cornish Game Hens posted at Yolks, kefir, and gristle, saying, "The age-old tradition of clay-pot cooking, and a few thoughts on my journey to good food."

Patty Strilaeff presents I Heart Salmon! (A Salmon Salad Recipe) posted at following my nose..., saying, "Here is the southern U.S., it's time for meals that don't require a lot of time in the kitchen, and this recipe fits the bill."

NJ Paleo Girl presents Paleo Lent- Week #6: Meet me in San Francisco! posted at NJ Paleo Girl, saying, "This Wednesday we’re escaping to the beautiful San Francisco… and the deliciousness of CIOPPINO: A seafood stew! This is truly the "Soul" food of the San Francisco waterfront and probably one of my favorite dishes."

Adam Farrah presents There are MANY different Paleo diets... posted at PracticalPaleolithic.com, saying, "A blog post about the variations that can be accommodated in a "Paleo" diet."

Adam Farrah presents SINS Challenge Update ? Setting Smaller Goals? posted at PracticalPaleolithic.com, saying, "A blog post about setting smaller goals, enjoying the journey and living in the moment."

Paul Jaminet presents HDL and Immunity posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post explains that HDL particles serve important immune functions; the follow-up post discusses ways to improve immunity by raising HDL."

Angelo Coppola presents Latest in Paleo Episode 11: Mummies, Frankenfoods, and a 17-day Diet posted at Latest in Paleo, saying, "Pretty fun episode with lots of news, clips, blog mentions, and an awesome piece of reader mail. As always, all of the reference links are in the show notes."

Stacy Toth presents Spunky Holiday: Nona's Chocolate Easter Eggs posted at Paleo Parents, saying, "Nona's "Peanut" Butter Eggs - Part of Spunky's Holiday Round-Up, sweetened with dates and honey"

Kristy A. presents Heirloom Tomato Soup posted at Feasting on Fitness, saying, "Super easy and super delicious tomato soup perfect warm or chilled and made simply from broiled heirloom tomatoes plus spices. Yum!"

Megh presents Pickled Beef Tongue posted at Yolks, kefir, and gristle, saying, "Well I didn't love it. But I made it, and I'll eat it until it's gone!"

Laurie Donaldson presents Food for a Primal Smackdown posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "An egg casserole for a primal smackdown."

Yael Grauer presents My Whole30 Experiment posted at Yael Writes, saying, "Yael starts her Whole30. Powered by Everyday Paleo. This will be updated each week."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: White Potatoes

By Diana Hsieh

New Potatoes

This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" was submitted to Google Moderator by me:
Do you eat white potatoes? Why or why not? If so, how do you prepare them?
We want to hear your answer in the comments! You're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming week or vote on questions submitted by others, go check out the Google Moderator session.

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Thursday, April 14, 2011

Tammy's Grilled Salmon

By Diana Hsieh

Since I got my Sous Vide Supreme last winter, I've cooked salmon in it periodically. However, I've not been happy with the results of late. I like the texture, but I find the flavor lacking. The fish just seems to drown out every other flavor -- and I want some charring. Hence, although salmon is Paul's favorite food, I've only made it rarely.

Last week, I decided to cook salmon on the grill. So I turned to Tammy Perkins, because I know that she has a finely-tuned method of grilling salmon. Here's what she told me to do -- and it worked wonderfully! (I forgot to take any pictures, sadly!)

Tammy's Grilled Salmon

Heat the grill to 400 degrees. Oil the grill, e.g. with cooking spray. Meanwhile, rub the salmon with olive oil and season to taste. Cajun spices are definitely a favorite.

Place the salmon on the grill, skin side up. (That way, the oils from under the skin drip down into the salmon.) Cook for seven minutes. Flip the salmon, then cook for one minute longer.

Eat!

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Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Hungarian Goulash

By Monica

I have no idea if this dish is really Hungarian (it certainly doesn't resemble the goulash my family made when I was a child), but it's one of my favorite recipes of all time so I must share. There is some truly amazing taste in this dish, which comes from a little old 1970s cookbook entitled Crockery Cooking by Irena Chalmers, inherited from my grandmother.

This crock pot dish is perfect for any remaining wintry days as summer approaches. Set up the ingredients in the morning, and when you return home your house will smell fabulous. It only takes about 20 minutes to cut up the beef and set everything else up. Upon returning home after a long workday, the only last minute attention involves stirring in some sour cream if you eat dairy.

Hungarian Goulash

1/2 c. red wine
2.5 lbs. chuck roast, cut into 1" cubes
1 onion
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
2 tomatoes, peeled, seeded, chopped (I use canned diced tomatoes)
2 tsp. tomato paste
1 T. paprika
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs parsley (dried will do)
1/2 t. thyme
1/2 t. salt (I use more)
freshly ground pepper (I use white, not black)
sour cream to taste

Combine all ingredients except sour cream in crock pot and cook on low for 8 hours. When done, stir sour cream into the goulash (about 1 T. per serving). The original recipe also calls for cooking up a pot of egg noodles, but obviously I skip that.

I'm not terribly talented in the food picture department. Here is an approximation of what the dish looks like. Enjoy!

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Tuesday, April 12, 2011

mini spanish burgers with manchego + garlic aioli

By Julie

My tapas parties in the past have become something of legend, amongst Joe and me. They weren't really parties, because we never thought to invite anyone, but still. I'd spend most of the day make tapa after tapa - patatas bravas, chicken and ham croquettes, roasted eggplant dip, potato and leek tortilla, honey almond cakes.... it was an ordeal. A wonderfully delicious ordeal! I keep meaning to have another one, and to actually invite some friends over. But until that time, I've settled for less extravagant tapas dinners. This time, the focus was these little, easy mini burgers topped with a few slices of aged manchego cheese and some homemade garlic aioli. I also made some quick roasted asparagus and sautéed mushrooms.

Making aioli or homemade mayo can be a trialing event. I don't make it very often, so I'm always a little out of practice when I set out to make it. This time was no exception. I actually thought it hadn't emulsified and gave up all hope, but when I looked at it a bit later saw that it had mysteriously thickened. Hmm. Works for me! If you've never made aioli or mayo before, you're in for a treat. It's so much better than store bought mayonnaise. Hopefully you won't have trouble getting the emulsification, but if you do, there are ways to save it. I've read a few different ways, but the one that's worked for me is to whisk another room temperature egg yolk, then slowly add the broken mayo to it. I've also found that a hand mixer fitted with the whisk attachments is better than a blender or food processor. (I initially forgot that and used a blender, which was why I think it didn't properly emulsify at first.) You can also hand whisk!

The vegetable tapas I made are really basic. If you're feeling fancy, you can do something like wrap the asparagus in serrano ham or similar. The mushrooms are just so, so good drizzled with the aioli that the only thing I can think to spruce them up with is garlic. But the mushrooms I bought were pretty big, so I'd worry about the garlic burning while they cooked. You could sprinkle them with smoked paprika, too.

I imagined lots of different ways I could make Spanish burgers. You could use all beef and use chorizo-like seasonings. I also thought about grinding up some marcona almonds and mixing them in. The manchego cheese could also be mixed into the beef. But what I settled on was a 1/2 and 1/2 mixture of bulk chorizo and ground beef. It was super simple, require little extra seasoning and was really good!

aioli

1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
1 garlic clove, pressed
1 tablespoon lemon juice or white wine vinegar
salt and pepper
5 tablespoons olive oil
5 tablespoons mild oil like safflower or sunflower (I actually used bacon grease because I realized I was out of safflower oil)

Whisk or blend the egg yolk, garlic clove, lemon juice, salt and pepper together. With the whisk or blender still going, add in the oil one drop at a time until the mixture starts to thicken. At that point, you can increase to a steady drizzle of oil until it is all incorporated. Season further with salt and pepper if desired.

roasted asparagus

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and brush asparagus with olive oil and sprinkle with coarse salt and pepper. Roast for about 10 minutes, depending on the thickness of the asparagus, or until crisp-tender. Mine was pretty thin and 10 minutes was borderline too long. You don't want the asparagus to be floppy.

sautéed mushrooms

Using about a pound of white mushrooms, cut off stems so they're close to the base of the caps. Cut any larger mushrooms in halves or quarters. Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a pan on high heat. Add mushrooms, flipping constantly until all oil is absorbed. Reduce heat to medium and sauté until mushrooms release their juices, about 5-8 minutes, depending on their size, and are cooked through. Squeeze some fresh lemon juice on top.

mini spanish burgers with manchego

1/2 pound ground beef
1/2 pound bulk chorizo, or uncooked chorizo sausages, casings removed
1 garlic clove, pressed or minced
pepper
aged manchego cheese
chopped fresh parsley

1. Mix the meats and garlic together and grind some pepper into the mixture too. The chorizo should be sufficiently salty, but you can sprinkle in a little salt if you'd like.

2. Heat some oil in a grill pan or regular pan on medium high heat. Form little patties, about a couple inches across, and cook for about 5 minutes. Flip, add a slice of cheese if you like it melted, and cook for about 5 minutes more. Cut into the burger and check for doneness - you don't want to eat undercooked ground pork.

3. Top with cheese (or more cheese if you already melted some on the burgers), a drizzle of aioli, and parsley.

Load up your plate with these little tapas. Oh, and get some good Rioja or Tempranillo to go with!



Originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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