Wednesday, March 30, 2011

cajun stew

By Julie

Oh man, this was good. Really, really good. And to top it off, it's a really good weeknight meal. It's one of my most favorite kinds of recipe - one of those that does not require any prep work because each ingredient's cooking time allows to you prep the next ingredient. Oh, and it's a one pot meal. Win!


This recipe is essentially jambalaya, but since there's no rice in it, I felt I couldn't call it such. I might get nasty comments about my blasphemy. There is a type of jambalaya where the rice is prepared separately and added upon serving, so I supposed mine is more like that, but still, I'll just call it stew. It's got the trinity of onions, peppers, and celery, which is like the mirepoix of Cajun cuisine, and there's chicken, kielbasa, andouille, bacon, and shrimp. It is as good, and better, as it sounds.

You're going to need a big heavy stock pot or Dutch oven for this recipe. Gather all of your ingredients and you're off! You'll have ample time to prep the next set of ingredients that gets added to the pot while the first is cooking. I was even able to do this, give or take a few minutes each time, while taking pictures. That stinking camera is sometimes the death of me during cooking.

There are a few substitutions that you can play around with in this recipe. The first is the kielbasa. The recipe I used called for linguiça. If you can't find this, you can use kielbasa, like I did, or chorizo. The original recipe also called for tasso, or if you can't find that, Black Forest ham. I didn't use either and, while I haven't tried it with, I didn't think the recipe suffered one bit. If you want to use more vegetables, that would be fine too. I actually doubled the amount in the original recipe and I'm happy I did. They add thickness and a nice texture contrast. The shrimp is up to you. I think it's beyond wonderful, and probably my favorite part in the stew, but I know it can be expensive. If you can't find shrimp on sale, I suppose I can go along with omitting it. But I must insist - stock up on frozen shrimp whenever it's on sale. It's a great way to get some seafood in your diet and it defrosts quickly.


cajun stew
adapted from Bon Appétit, serves about 6-8

6 ounces bacon, diced
14 ounces smoked fully cooked sausage (such as linguiça, kielbasa, or chorizo), halved lengthwise, cut crosswise into 1/2 inch-thick semi-circles
1 pound andouille sausages, quartered lengthwise, cut crosswise into 1/2 inch cubes
1/2 pound tasso or smoked ham (such as Black Forest), cut into 1/2 inch cubes (optional)
1 large onion, chopped
1 large celery stalk, chopped
1 red bell pepper, coarsely chopped
1 green bell pepper, coarsely chopped
4 large skinless boneless chicken thighs, cut into 1- to 1 1/2 inch chunks
1 tablespoon paprika
1/2 tablespoon thyme
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon (or more) cayenne pepper
1 14.5 ounce can of diced tomatoes and green chiles (or regular tomatoes and add a green chile, seeded and chopped)
1 pound shrimp, defrosted (if necessary), peeled and deveined
4 green onions, chopped
chopped parsley, thin stems okay

1. Heat a large, heavy pot on medium heat, add bacon and cook for about 8 to 10 minutes, until brown and beginning to crisp.

2. Add the sausages, and optional ham. Sauté the meats until getting brown, about 10 minutes.

3. Add onions, celery, peppers, and optional chile. Stirring occasionally, cook the vegetables until soft, about 10 to 12 minutes.

4. Add chicken. Cook until chicken is mostly white on the outsides, about 5 to 6 minutes.

5. Mix in spices and canned tomatoes. Lower heat to medium low, cover, and cook for about 20 minutes, until chicken and andouille are fully cooked. This should be ample time.

6. Uncover the pot and add the shrimp. Cover and cook for about 12 minutes more. If the stew seems dry, you can add a little beef or chicken broth. Adjust any spices you'd like. I didn't need a bit of salt in mine and I did up the cayenne a tid.

Serve the stew with the scallions and parsley on top. Enjoy!!

Originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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Monday, March 28, 2011

Livestock Confinement: Fantasy and Reality

By Diana Hsieh

Melissa McEwen recently noted that "it's a myth that letting animals do their own thing outside is always the best thing for them." So true! Pastured pigs routinely crush their little piglets to death. Farrowing crates and other human contraptions, while sometimes not wholly pleasant for the pigs, prevent those deaths.

Of course, we don't raise livestock for the good of the livestock. Farmers ought to be self-interested, and that means being primarily concerned with the profitability of their farm. However, I don't think that brutalizing animals is good for the balance sheet -- or one's own moral character -- and that's why I'm in favor of the humane treatment of livestock. (There's a question waiting in the queue for my Rationally Selfish Webcast on the humane treatment of animals... so go vote for it if you want me to address it!)

However, the humane treatment of animals doesn't always mean that the animals must be pastured or free-range. Animals are dumb beasts -- and they are driven by instincts or impulses that are often self-destructive. Here's an example of that from my own experience that I posted in the comments on Melissa's post:

On the supposed goodness of animals doing their own thing outside:

One of my horses, Tara, has a strong instinct to stand tail-to-wind (which wild horses would do) in nasty weather. So when it rains or snows, she'll stand on the south side of the barn -- to the point of endangering her life -- rather than move inside the barn or even under the overhang. That behavior is a particular problem for her, as she's never had a particularly thick coat, so if it's raining or snowing, she'll get chilled to the bone very quickly.

If I was not there to tend to her -- whether to put a blanket on her (which she doesn't mind so much) or lock her into the barn (which she hates) -- she would have died years ago from exposure, despite totally adequate shelter.

Personally, I'm a strong believer and practitioner of allowing my horses to roam as they please. The horses are happier, and hence I'm happier. I don't lock them in the barn unless I have some important reason for doing so -- like dangerous weather outside.

Nonetheless, beasts are not rational decision-makers, and they'll often act in ways that endanger their own lives -- or the lives of their companions. They'll do so repeatedly, even when better alternatives are obviously available. They usually can't be trained out of such behavior. So we, their human owners, need to be on the lookout for such behaviors -- and to protect them from the harm they would do -- even if the animals are frustrated and unhappy as a result of not being able to do what "nature" dictates.

And if that means confining sows so that they don't crush their piglets too, then so be it!
I hope to write more on this topic in the future, but that's enough for now!

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Saturday, March 26, 2011

Objectivist Tidbit: Aristotle Versus Plato

By Diana Hsieh

Ayn Rand on Aristotle versus Plato:

If there is a philosophical Atlas who carries the whole of Western civilization on his shoulders, it is Aristotle. He has been opposed, misinterpreted, misrepresented, and—like an axiom—used by his enemies in the very act of denying him. Whatever intellectual progress men have achieved rests on his achievements.

Aristotle may be regarded as the cultural barometer of Western history. Whenever his influence dominated the scene, it paved the way for one of history’s brilliant eras; whenever it fell, so did mankind. The Aristotelian revival of the thirteenth century brought men to the Renaissance. The intellectual counter-revolution turned them back toward the cave of his antipode: Plato.

There is only one fundamental issue in philosophy: the cognitive efficacy of man’s mind. The conflict of Aristotle versus Plato is the conflict of reason versus mysticism. It was Plato who formulated most of philosophy’s basic questions—and doubts. It was Aristotle who laid the foundation for most of the answers. Thereafter, the record of their duel is the record of man’s long struggle to deny and surrender or to uphold and assert the validity of his particular mode of consciousness.
Ayn Rand primarily admired Aristotle for his metaphysics and epistemology, but as a moral philosopher, I've found deep value in his ethics, particularly his moral psychology. In fact, my upcoming webcast on "Cultivating Moral Character" draws substantially on -- and helps explain -- his theory of moral habituation.

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The Objectivist Roundup & Rationally Selfish Webcast

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health. Rational Jenn hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast.

If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

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Friday, March 25, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #053

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: New Tree's 73% Cherry posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "To my fortune I won this chocolate in a contest, which is particularly nice since I've been wanting to try this specific variety. Nice and wine-like."

Mike Fout / New Renaissance presents Louisiana Saturday Night posted at Every Day A New Adventure, saying, "Spring is here and so are the best little crustaceans in Louisiana!!! Crawfish."

Tyler presents Real Food 6: Classic Breakfast - Homegrown Eggs, Bacon, Sausage posted at Evolutionary Health Systems, saying, "Why are pastured eggs so awesome? Especially with bacon..."

Wenchypoo presents My Big Fat Greek Medical Legend posted at Wisdom From Wenchypoo's Mental Wastebasket, saying, "I'm reading a rather interesting book about medicine, and found this tale worth posting and passing on--it tells how and when medicine went off the rails."

Rafael presents Getting Started Livin' Primal posted at Livin' Primal, saying, "I have started a new blog on my journey to primal/paleo living. Hope you join me!"

Todd Dosenberry presents Bacon & Eggs with Coconut, Berries & Cinnamon = $2.81 Paleo Low Carb Post Strength Training Workout Happy Meal posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Bacon and Eggs for breakfast makes for a healthy, cheap happy meal. McDonalds gives you crap while I give you heaven. Its cheaper too!"

Kris presents Is saturated fat bad for you? posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "An article answering the question is saturated fat bad for you, supported by evolutionary logic and peer-reviewed research studies."

Ravi presents Next Up: Soylent Green (Soylent White Already in Production…) posted at DaiaSolGaia, saying, "You all remember Soylent Green, yes? A truly original Sci-Fi Paleo Meal! (we were sometimes cannibals in history, ya know...)"

Amy Kubal presents Teaming Up with The Whole9! posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Even more PALEO POWER!!!"

Paul Jaminet presents Seth Roberts and Circadian Therapy posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Strong circadian rhythms are essential to good health, and some surprising dietary and lifestyle tactics enhance these rhythms."

Logan Marshall presents The Monkey Man Workout | Wild Movement posted at Wild Movement.

Angelo Coppola presents Paleo Pho Recipe / Vietnamese Beef Soup / Bone Marrow posted at Latest in Paleo, saying, "Delicious Pho spices, hearty Paleo bone marrow broth base. This stuff is the nectar of the gods. It's also my favorite lunch to pack for work. Lots of pictures and easy to follow steps. Enjoy!"

Beth Mazur presents Ancestral diet & lifestyle review paper posted at Weight Maven, saying, "the paleo community went ga-ga over "The western diet and lifestyle and diseases of civilization" last week, a comprehensive review by the gurus in the academic paleosphere. If white papers make your head spin, I've highlighted key passages for easier reading."

Pepper Ruper presents A study in being a true badass: my mother's paleo journey posted at Paleo Pepper, saying, "We all love a good success story. This one is as inspiring, beautiful, and badass as they come."

Travis Schefcik presents Paleo Diet: 10 Tips When Eating A Paleo Diet Video posted at Uncommon Wellness.

Dallas Hartwig presents Robb Wolf/Whole9 Fish Oil Calculator, Version 2.0 posted at Whole9.

Melissa "Melicious" Joulwan presents Kibbeh Sinayee (Lamb Diamonds!) posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "I come from a Lebanese-Italian family of cooks, and I'm slowly revamping family recipes for my paleo life. This was a huge success and tastes like love."

Michelle Tram presents The Psychology of Wasting posted at Wasted Food, saying, "To better understand why people have been so wiling to squander food, it is important to explore the psychology of waste. This article goes over the basis of our habits of wasteful lifestyles."

Kerri Heffel presents paleo shepherd's pie posted at the functional foodie, saying, "A classic recipe, made paleo!"

Julia Campbell presents mini spanish burgers with manchego + garlic aioli posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "A fun tapas dinner with delicious beef and chorizo burgers and garlicky aioli."

NJ Paleo Girl presents 2 Months In: I'M WEARING MY SKINNY JEANS!!! posted at NJ Paleo Girl, saying, "My weight has always fluctuated, and I’ve never felt "skinny" enough... UNTIL NOW! After two months following the Paleo Diet, and completely SLACKING at the gym-- let’s just say today, if I make it, will be my first time in over TEN DAYS! I usually go 5 days a week!-- I am fitting into my “skinny jeans” (that’s down at least one whole size)!!"

NJ Paleo Girl presents S.A.D.? What Would Grok Do? posted at NJ Paleo Girl, saying, "This winter has been particularly rough in the way of freezing cold temperatures, snow fall (we’re up to at least 60” of snowfall this winter in Hoboken!), and general dreariness--- hello shoveling and de-icing! It is no surprise that many of us are feeling down and out, and wondering if we’ve been affected by SAD."

Nell Stephenson presents Yams vs. Squash... for Pre Workout Fueling? posted at TrainWithNellie.

Adam presents Of Champions posted at zero-one-ten's posterous, saying, "Breakfast battle: bacon and eggs vs. granola bars! Talk about an unfair fight!"

Primal Kitchen's Family Grokumentarian presents Celebrating Special Occasions While Sticking To Your Low-Carb Weight Loss Goals posted at Primal Kitchen: A Family Grokumentary, saying, "Though special occasions are often reserved as perfect times to let loose and indulge a little, it would appear that I have a little dilemma - special occasions come a little too frequently! How do you deal with your frequent special occasions while keeping on track for your weight loss goals?"

Dr. John presents Paleo Fast Food in the Developing World posted at Paleoterran, saying, "Guest post by John Michael looks at carnitas and food politics in Bogota."

Richard presents Recipe: Primal Chicken Kabobs posted at Primal Fed.

Meghan Little / Angel Torres presents French Salad Dressing posted at Paleo Effect.

Ana Johnson presents Roasted Veggies and Fish posted at Whole Life Diets, Autoimmune diet, Registered Dietitian, Paleo, saying, "A Paleo cooking video using just delivered veggies from the local CSA!"

Julie Sullivan Mayfield presents Recipe Time - aka "The magic of coconut milk" posted at BTB's Nutrition and Performance Blog, saying, "When a recipe calls for cream, coconut milk is a mighty fine substitution. Give this one a try as your next side dish to go with some steak!"

Laurie Donaldson presents Chicken Pot "Pie" posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Not orthodox paleo, but I like to break the mold sometimes..."

Joe Berne presents The Paleo Bachelor: White Sweet Potato Fries posted at Karate Conditioning, saying, "A recipes so easy even a bachelor can make it! Sweet potato fries, paleo approved!"

Patty Strilaeff presents Paleo Shrimp Kebobs or Kebabs or Kabobs...Stuff on a Stick. posted at following my nose....

Kristy A. presents "Get Busy Living or Get Busy Dying" posted at Feasting on Fitness, saying, "I'm creating a resource for parents (and anyone else interested) in support of a Paleo/Primal/Real Food approach to nutrition to help substitute out sugars and starches with fruits and vegetables. Please help contribute!"

Robin presents Why You Should Stand On Shaky Ground (and Walk On It and Run On It) posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "Our bodies are not meant to walk on flat even surfaces all the time. Why we should all be on shaky ground more often."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Strange Foods

By Diana Hsieh

Lord of the flies


This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" was submitted to Google Moderator by me:
What's the strangest paleo-friendly food that you eat?
Based on the votes on that question, people want to hear your answer in the comments! And you're also welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming week or vote on questions submitted by others, go check out the Google Moderator session.

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Thursday, March 24, 2011

Chocolate Review: Green & Black's 67% Espresso

By Benjamin Skipper

I never liked coffee. While I was a kid I tried it here and there in order to try and fit in with the adults in my life, but the bitterness was terrible and the caffeine would charge the hell out of me and cause a horrendous crash later on. Despite repeated attempts to try and like it I've always ended up forgoing it. To this day in my adult life I still don't drink coffee; possibly never will. I thought it might entirely be a mistake, then, for me to have purchased a bar of Green & Black's Espresso dark chocolate with 67% cocoa.

Really, I think the only reason why I purchased it is because I had in mind at the time that the moderator of Modern Paleo regularly enjoyed coffee, so this bar caught my attention during my chocolate shopping. I nearly glanced over it since I was aware of my dislike of coffee, but curiosity and fair-mindedness compelled me to buy one. I've been holding off on it for quite a while since I wasn't tempted to taste it, but this week I decided it was time. My expectations were that of assaulting bitterness and perhaps an overwhelming buzz, so I didn't go in with excited anticipation. When I took my first bite my estimate was formed instantly.

Heaven. Holy crap is this one of the best chocolates I ever tasted in my life.

There is not a single vice in the entire experience. The flavor takes the form of a strong trio all balanced with equivalent intensity: bittersweet coffee with a touch of smoke, satisfyingly gratuitous pinches of sugar, and sharply sweet and milky cream. The cocoa cannot be differentiated from this trio, for rather it plays perfectly into them by blending in and boosting every attribute. Delectable is the chocolate side to the faces of the coffee, sugar, and cream. The experience is consistently that of coffee for a very long time, though there is a strong chocolate finish if you taste with the back of your tongue.

The coffee will haunt your palate for a long time even after the finish, both in the taste of your breath and in its memory on your tongue. My tasting was conducted very early in the morning, and yet it stuck with me throughout most of the day. I brushed, flossed, drank lots of water, ate a herb roasted turkey leg with butter, hot sauced spinach, sour pickles, and mildly sharp asiago cheese, and yet late in the evening while at work the taste of coffee came back. My brain was pleasured by its memory, moving me to hold a half-smile for much of my shift. Even the very next afternoon I could still detect tangy hints of the coffee in my back upper molars. Now there's a finish!

This chocolate fed my soul in a way, with no ill effects afterwards. It put me in a mildly euphoric state in the morning and was sustained throughout most of the day, even giving me an emotional boost while I was just *thinking* about it at work. I went to bed as usual, slept like a baby, and woke up rested, suffering no crash the day before and no desire for caffeine for its own sake in the morning. All uplifting with no return to inferior states, at least for my body's composition.

G & B's did a wonderful job integrating the coffee beans, for there was no evidence of them in the texture or appearance. Breaking the bar led to only a crisp snap and the inner being of the chocolate yielded a smooth gradient with no isolated bean chunks; just smooth flesh with a shadowy black color and an imprecisely reflecting sheen. Inside the mouth each bite is soft almost like a very firm pillow at the first few chews, and it slowly moves into that lovely state of being a viscous paste. No movement towards being a watery liquid! The aroma was that of very nearly pure soothing coffee, with a small suggestion of sweetened cocoa.

I love chocolate, and yet it's rare that I have an experience this good. The bar smells wonderful, tastes heavenly and lingers nigh on forever, is awesomely soft and soon velvety, and gave me a super boost in my well-being not only with its nourishment, but in the great memory it imprinted. It's a horrible misfortune now to think that I only bought one!

Most surprising to me is how well I reacted to the caffeine, as I fully expected to be overly hyper and then crash into exhaustion later on, but the uplift I got wasn't unsettling and there was no downfall. I cannot speak for other people, but it seems that my own body at least is well tolerant of caffeine.

Do I even need to say I greatly recommend this coffee chocolate? What a smashing start to the year for my reviews! I love this so much that it's easily in the top two of my hierarchy of favorites, second only to my beloved herb-infused variety, mint. In the future I would definitely consider buying this in bulk and having it piled high in my pantry. Other people may need to strongly contemplate how much they ought to consume at a time given their caffeine tolerance, but this is an incredible taste experience that needs to be had at least once.

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Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Eliminating Life Long Eczema by Cutting Out Milk

By Miranda Barzey

Eczema has been a problem for me since childhood. It usually sprang up in the winter when the air got dry. I would do my best to combat it with thick greasy lotion, moisturizing body washes, and hydrocortisone cream. It helped keep the eczema from spreading, but it didn't go away fully till summer. Late in my teens my eczema got worse and became a year-long problem. Rather than a few annoying itchy spots, I now had large and painful splotches all over my body. It was all over knees, elbows, and wrists even in the most humid months of summer. It was really embarrassing.

I eventually sought out a dermatologist for the problem. I was very disappointed in the treatment I got. Before even seeing me, the doctor prescribed the most potent steroid cream on the market. (What if I didn't want steroids?!) When he finally did sit down with me, I asked him if there was anything I could do with my diet to help ease the eczema, perhaps some specific vitamin supplements? He merely shrugged me off and said the cream would fix everything.

The cream did work. I applied it twice a day and within a few days my eczema had almost cleared up completely. I was amazed. The downside was that the cream could only be used for two week and then I had to stop or it might eat through my skin completely. Oh. Great. After the two weeks were up I had extreme burning sensations where my eczema had been for a few days. The majority of it was gone, but the steroid cream was a great solution only in the short term. The red splotches started to come back a few months later. I certainly couldn't keep using the toxic stuff over and over. I started to seek out more long term fixes.

In my quest for relief I tried bleach baths, coconut oil, shea butter, and several different brands of lotions, but nothing worked. I'd been following the paleo diet (mostly) for a year or so and I had read the diet helped eliminate a lot of skin issues, mostly by cutting out grains. I rarely ate any wheat or other grains and yet my eczema was worse than before I started eating paleo. I'd almost written paleo off as a solution when a friend suggested that it might be dairy causing the problem. After trying countless topical methods, I was willing to try a solution that started inside my body. I cut out all milk, butter, cream, cheese, and ice cream. It was extremely hard given that my family uses copious amounts of butter in their cooking and I was chauffeur to a sister who liked to hit up Baskin Robbins for $1 scoop Tuesday. I made it two weeks before caving and bingeing out on pizza and ice cream. Despite my crap self-control, I made it long enough to see a noticeable difference in my eczema. It had definitely shrunk during my dairy-free experiment. I decided I would continue to eat dairy, but cut out milk, which I had read caused the worst skin reactions.

Within a month my eczema was completely gone. I decided to keep with my no-milk diet through winter, my most vulnerable time to break out, to see if it truly cured my eczema. Now at the beginning of spring I can safely say that my eczema has not come back at all! I still eat lots of cheese, sour cream, butter, and half & half. I moisturize with Eucerin's daily lotion after showering. I no longer have itchy and embarrassing red spots all over. I don't have to slather myself in greasy oils/lotions. I'm so excited to have finally found a solution to a lifelong problem.

What are your experiences with diet and eczema? Have you tried cutting some or all dairy?


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Tuesday, March 22, 2011

chimichurri beef lettuce wraps

By Julie


This is kind of a lazy day recipe. Well, meant to spice up a lazy day recipe. We've all got those, "ugh, what the heck am I going to make" dinners. For me it usually ends up as burgers with bacon and sweet potato fries. Now, I know that's nothing to gripe about, but sometimes I just need something a little different. I thought making a chimichurri sauce would be fun, and heck, instead of burgers, how about lettuce wraps? I love lettuce wraps.



There are a million and one recipes for chimichurri, and I'm by no means attached to one. But basically, it's just parsley, garlic, oil, and vinegar. You can take it from there. I added in onion this time (a bit too much actually), and red pepper flakes are a must. Paprika is a great spice to add and you can also add in cilantro, but be aware that some people find this blasphemous, as it's not traditional. Pff, whatever. Try experimenting with the level of vinegar. That's certainly the most overpowering aspect of chimichurri. I start on the low side and add little bits at a time until it's the right strength.


The beef here is simply seasoned and you can play around with what spices and aromatics you use. I used cilantro, onion, garlic, cumin, oregano, and thyme. Try serving this simple dish with different kinds of veggies to mix it up. A zucchini and garlic sauté would work great. I made sweet potato fries, big surprise. Plantains would be wonderful, and fried yuca too! Mushrooms, peppers, and ooh corn on the cob in the summer! The list goes on. I'd keep the vegetable flavorings on the light side - some garlic, salt, and pepper, and perhaps some lemon or lime juice.


chimichurri beef lettuce wraps
serves 4

for the chimichurri
1/4 cup olive oil
1/8 cup + 1 teaspoon red-wine vinegar
1/4 inch thick onion slice
2 garlic cloves
1/2 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley, small stems are okay
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon hot red-pepper flakes

for the beef
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 lb ground beef
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
1 teaspoon thyme leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons oregano leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
salt and pepper to taste
lettuce leaves of your choice

1. In a food processor, combine all ingredients for chimichurri and blend until smooth. Alternatively, you can hand chop everything and have it be on the chunkier side.

2. In a medium sized sauté pan, heat oil. Add onions and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add remainder of ingredients and cook, stirring often until beef is cooked through, about 10 minutes.

3. Assemble the lettuce wraps how you'd like. Top the beef with chimichurri, as well as cheese, extra cilantro, sour cream, salsa, and any other extras you'd like. I have to push for using cotija again - it's such a good cheese!

Originally posted at my blog, the crankin' kitchen!

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Monday, March 21, 2011

Paleo Community Survey

By Diana Hsieh

As you might have seen elsewhere, David Csonka of Naturally Engineered invites you to participate in the 2011 Paleo Community Survey:

The purpose of this survey is to collect information about paleo diet community members, including demographic information, medical conditions, dietary preferences, and physical activity.

The resulting data will be invaluable in terms of understanding the nature of the paleo movement. It will be provided to other bloggers and researchers with the goal of providing a clearer picture of how the paleo diet has affected the lives of its adherents.

Survey respondents will remain anonymous, your name or other identifying information will not be collected. The survey itself is relatively short and should only take a couple of minutes to complete.

Several incentives for completion of the survey have been provided, and will be explain further at the end of the survey. These include a coupon code for Paleo Treats products and the opportunity to win one of several giveaway Amazon.com gift cards.
To participate in the survey, go here by this Saturday, March 26th: 2011 Paleo Community Survey.

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Saturday, March 19, 2011

Objectivist Roundup & Rationally Selfish Webcast

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome. Rational Jenn hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. Go take a look!

My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast. If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

The Objective Standard is a quarterly journal with in-depth commentary on culture and politics from an Objectivist perspective. It's latest issue will be arriving in mailboxes and newsstands soon, so go check out its two free articles!

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Friday, March 18, 2011

The Paleo Rodeo #052

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Endangered Species' 72% Coexist Toffee Pieces posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "I thought I'd give Endangered Species' toffee pieces a try since I was disappointed in the bar, and this has not been a disappointing treat."

Jeff Callahan presents The 4 Most Dangerous Types of Weight Loss Supplements posted at How to Die Young, saying, "Why you should avoid weight loss supplements if you are involved in a paleo lifestyle and have long term weight loss goals."

Marisa presents Lam-a-Lamba GrokBalls posted at Primal Pearls, saying, "A wonderful recipe for lamb meatballs, donated to the blog by my mother! They say everything tastes better when Mom makes it!"

Tyler presents A Secret to Success - In Anything posted at Evolutionary Health Systems, saying, "Elegantly simply and amazing results. Always keep this in mind when your trying to achieve a goal."

Wenchypoo presents "Look Ma--No Grains!" Meat Loaf Pizza posted at Wisdom From Wenchypoo's Mental Wastebasket, saying, "There's a Thanksgiving leftover version at the bottom--just ignore it (it contains stuffing and potatoes). I originally wrote it for frugal people and Celiacs trying to figure out how to put Thanksgiving leftovers to creative use."

Wenchypoo presents Grow Your Own Shiitake Mushrooms posted at Wisdom From Wenchypoo's Mental Wastebasket, saying, "An article originally from the Christian Science monitor with my tips on doing it frugally."

Todd Dosenberry presents Primal Protein Blueberry Coconut Smoothie Recipe posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Simple smoothie recipe. It includes whey but is great for post-workout!"

Patty Pittman presents Eating Out Primal ~ Brazilian Steak House posted at Primal 30 Day Challenge, saying, "Eating out at restaurants, for someone who wants to eat Primal, can be come difficult and sometimes require one to be creative. When visiting a Brazilian Steak House, specifically Gauchos Brazilian Steak House in Portland, Maine, there is no creativity required."

Kris presents Calculating calories for weight loss – The solution? posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "An article displaying doubt about how calculating calories for weight loss is probably not the right solution to the obesity epidemic."

Ravi presents Get Stupid & Get Cancer in Convenient, BPA-lined-Hormone-Disrupting Can posted at DaiaSolGaia, saying, "Although never an addict (happily), i did use to keep this canned crap around the house for the occasional sugar-jolt - well, NO MORE..."

Michelle Tram presents The Psychology of a Max Effort Attempt posted at Project Swole - A Conditioning, Weightlifting, and Nutrition Blog, saying, "Find out how mental exercises can help you gain muscle strength for your next work out!"

Amy Kubal presents Buying Meat On A Budget posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "No more excuses! Eating meat doesn't have to cost a fortune!"

Tara Grant presents What To Do When You Cheat posted at Primal Living, saying, "Advice for those of you that have strayed, or cheated way too much lately, and are looking to get back on the Primal/Paleo Path."

Dustin Sharp presents Bringing the Modern World and Paleo Principles Together Through Cycling posted at Paleo Vélo.

Julia Campbell presents sweet potato and sausage shepherd's pie posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "This recipe is a fun twist on traditional Shepherd's Pie. Make it for St. Patrick's Day!"

Primal Kitchen's Family Grokumentarian presents Is Ron Swanson of NBC's Parks and Recreation Secretly Primal / Paleo? posted at Primal Kitchen: A Family Grokumentary, saying, "I am slowly beginning to suspect that one of my current favorite TV characters, Ron Swanson, may secretly be primal or paleo. The evidence is presented for your consideration!"

Patty Strilaeff presents One Month, and Still No Cupcakes! posted at following my nose....

Nell Stephenson presents A New Challenge - Paleo In A Feeding Tube posted at TrainWithNellie.

Kate Yoak presents Poo-less hair: troubleshooting posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "An update on 'pooless hair. Having ditched shampoo and conditioner many months ago and ran into a stumbling block. Finally, I learned how to get my hair really clean and keep it healthy."

J. Stanton presents "Live Now, Live Later": Paleo Diet, Paleo Life posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, "I reject the false dichotomy that we must be either sybarites (“Live now, pay later”) or self-flagellants (“Pay now, live later”). I propose a more accurate and joyous maxim for the paleo movement."

Lindsey presents Sun-dried Tomato Chicken and Squash Casserole posted at Enjoying Healthy Foods, saying, "I love searching blogs, when I have some spare time. I love finding a good recipe that can be adapted or transformed! Although this dish is not one of those, I instantly thought of things to add to this dish!"

M presents Paleo Eats: 3/14/11 posted at Nom Nom Paleo, saying, "I'm a night shift worker so I have to make dinner for the family before I leave AND I need to pack all my meals for work. Here's what a typical day of Paleo eats looks like on a work night."

Pepper Ruper presents Rats binge on pure fat, but escape with sanity in tact posted at Paleo Pepper, saying, "Animal models here show that it's pleasurable to binge on fat, and possible to condition a response to fat bingeing, but that only carbohydrate foods induce withdrawal symptoms."

NJ Paleo Girl presents Got Calcium? posted at NJ Paleo Girl.

Laurie Donaldson presents Weekly Menu Two posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Another weekly paleo/primal menu based on the great minds of paleo."

Beth Mazur presents Chris Kresser & Robb Wolf on omega 3s posted at Weight Maven, saying, "this is a transcript of Chris and Robb's podcast comments about omega 3 supplementation. If you're taking lots of fish oil pills, this one's for you!"

Amanda presents My Personal Paleo Diet Results posted at Primal Fed.

Travis Schefcik presents Sugar Suicide (video) posted at Uncommon Wellness.

Joe Berne presents Is The Training Lifestyle Selfish? posted at Karate Conditioning, saying, "If you ever feel selfish for spending your time and money investing in your fitness, read this. If you don't, read it anyway, and make your spouse read it."

Logan Marshall presents Moving Meditation: Sprinting Into Stillness posted at Wild Movement.

Kerri Heffel presents "We gain the strength of the temptation we resist." -Ralph Waldo Emerson posted at the functional foodie, saying, "Don't let temptation get between you and your goals."

Melissa "Melicious" Joulwan presents Lemony Spinach (a la TMJ) posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "Sometimes the simplest recipes have the best flavors... lemon, onion, olive oil, and spinach... yum!"

Nicole Markee - Astrogirl presents An Opportunity Missed posted at Astrogirl.

Dr. John presents Yoga: Correcting the Sedentary Lifestyle posted at Paleoterran, saying, "Modern Postural Yoga is for those who want to enjoy the discipline’s remarkable health benefits without the other components of traditional yoga."

Frank Hagan presents Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes posted at Low Carb Age, saying, "Dr. Parker's new book is a mash-up of the low carb / paleo lifestyle and traditional Mediterranean diet. Can this possibly work?"

Ryan presents St. Patty's Day - Paleo Style posted at The Urban Cave - Chicago, saying, "Surviving St. Patty's Day in Chicago."

Miranda Barzey presents Eliminating Life Long Eczema by Cutting Out Milk posted at Building Atlantis, saying, "How I finally got rid of my persistent eczema by eliminating milk from my diet."

Paul Jaminet presents Clam Chowder posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post offers our recipe for New England Clam Chowder. Enjoy!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Snacks

By Diana Hsieh

snack time.


This week's "Paleo Question of the Week" was submitted by Brian:
I have some questions regarding the paleo diet. I work as a paramedic and as an RN. Both of my jobs are "12 hour shifts" professions, and therefore I rely on my coffee and unfortunately have to eat quick food most of the time. Still, I make as much time as possible for exercising, and I love leading a healthy lifestyle. But it's just hard on my schedule sometimes which leads me to my question. Do you have any tips for me on some quick and portable paleo meals/snacks? Also, what about my coffee and occassional sugar free energy drink?
We'd love to hear your answers to those questions in the comments on this post... or you're welcome to post a comment or question on any other paleo-related topic.

And look, something new! If you'd like to submit a question for an upcoming week or vote on questions submitted by others, go check out this Google Moderator session.

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Thursday, March 17, 2011

Chocolate Review: Endangered Species' 72% with Blueberries

By Benjamin Skipper

I love berries. I have a particular fondness for the tart zip they can provide through their acidity. Removing the acid, of course, removes much of that pleasant tanginess (such as by dehydrating), but there are still virtues to be enjoyed in the leftover mellowness. I had high expectations, then, for Endangered Species' 72% dark chocolate with blueberries.That company is, after all, the one I've come to expect the most from given their consistent quality. By their own virtue they've come to be the brand I've reviewed most on this site.

The first things to spike my interest were the absolutely fitting and beautiful aesthetics of both the packaging and bar. Turtles and seawater have nothing to do with blueberries of course, but the photography highlights the blue so intensely that one cannot help but expect nothing else but a blueberry sensation. And as always, there's interesting information to read inside about the current state of an endangered specie. An educational experience while you eat, though I'd suggest keeping your mind on the chocolate.

ES is extremely consistent in the quality of the aesthetics of their bars, so I must have not been paying thorough attention in the past because this bar surprised me with its attractiveness. Apart from ES' representative tree symbol on each dome, this bar possesses the best shine I have ever seen in a chocolate. It's so smooth that it might be on the verge of becoming a reflective mirror! There are no cracks, fissures, dust, or any kind of beauty defects. It's just simply a great looking bar that I couldn't help but keep staring at before I broke it up.

I feel disappointed by the lack of depth in the berry note of the flavor, however. Biting down I could detect a strong note of sugary milk with a subtle hint of smoke along with fruity cocoa. The fruity attribute could be credited to the blueberries infused, but unfortunately it's hard to detect that it is blueberries making the contribution. As mentioned above, absent their acidity and berries lose most of their tart power, so in the drying process it seems that these blueberries lost their individuality to the chocolate.

The transition of the experience is intriguing. It turns out pleasurably mild, but the cocoa notes start climbing in intensity as soon as it sits on your tongue, and at the finish it's nearly overwhelming. What strength! I don't think I've ever had chocolate that intensifies itself like this, almost as if I were growing more and more sensitive to it. Don't swallow too soon or you'll miss out on the peak.

Mouthfeel-wise it starts out very firm at first break with the bar, but it rapidly dissolves into a pure liquid at the same pace it rushes to intensify its chocolate notes. Very, very good, but it's so rapid and thin that I almost wish it'd slow down slightly. My favorite part of a smooth chocolate is the viscosity of the paste, but it dashes past that stage so quickly that it's hard to notice any transitional period. It's a fluid in practically a blink of an eye.

Fruity chocolate dominates the aroma, almost in a way that you can detect it's dried fruit, but still nothing uniquely blueberry. It's utterly simple and makes one expect a sort of mellow tangy experience, something it doesn't deliver on.

Overall, this is a very tasty chocolate that commits the terrible error of breaking its promise. The blueberries are clearly there and are contributing to the slight fruitiness, but their individuality is muted otherwise with the loss of their acids and essential oils. The experience is saved by the amazingly intense chocolate and liquidifying mouthfeel, but I enjoy a bar for keeping the promises it gives. I went in and only got the body, not the soul, of the berries. This chocolate is very good, but for the blueberries? No. I'd pass this up instead for ES' raspberry bar, which preserves a good degree of the acidic zip in the dehydration process (and is very femininely attractive with the bright pink spots).

This variety can still be saved, and I hope ES considers such an option. In order to heighten the blueberry note I would suggest perhaps adding a good extract. It would do well to also evenly distribute the flavor. Alternatively, they could abandon the dried-fruit option altogether and go for an essential oil, like they've done for their organic cherry, which is incredibly intense. Something to look forward to in the future, Endangered Species?

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Wednesday, March 16, 2011

A Lesson from Horse Teeth

By Diana Hsieh

Here's a simple lesson from a new study: evolution is sloooooooooow.

[Evolutionary biologist] Nikos Solounias helped develop a methodology known as dental mesowear analysis to reconstruct the diets of extinct species by measuring food-related wear and tear on fossil teeth. He and [Matthew] Mihlbachler used the process to investigate wear patterns on the molars of thousands of fossil horses. They later analyzed their data alongside records of North American climate changes that would have shifted the animals' diets from rainforest fruits and woody, leafy vegetation to the more abrasive diets found in grasslands.

"Lag time in the evolution of horse teeth in comparison to dietary changes is critical," Mihlbachler explained. "We found that evolutionary changes in tooth anatomy lag behind the dietary changes by a million years or more."
(H/T: Bil Danielson)


Editor's note: The rate of evolution can vary. /Christian

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Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Gluco-meter Experimentation

By Jeff

2 days ago I purchased a Blood Glucose(BG) meter and have been using it to see my fasting blood glucose and how the my body responds to the foods I eat. Since I eat pretty clean I expect little strangeness, but I wonder how the occasional cheat, like some popcorn with dinner on Friday nights.


The glucometer was fairly cheap,costing $10 or so from a local big box department store. It was a surprise to my wife that I could get one without a prescription, but there it was on the shelf. There were some that were pricier, at $30 or so, but since I wasn't super serious about it I stuck with the cheaper one. I have no idea whether the extra cost is worth it.

Using it is surprisingly easy. It came with a small pen-like device to poke through a finger tip. You feel a slight prick, but it isn't very painful and doesn't last long. About one single drop of blood comes out and nothing more and it hasn't left any noticeable scar. It takes only 10 seconds or so to get the reading starting with opening the small packet with everything in it.

So far my waking BG is around 95-100(I am not sure how accurate these things are or whether I need to calibrate it). I did an all day fast Monday and it was 91 by the 23hr mark on the fast. After a fairly healthy wine dinner the BG dropped to the lower 80s, which was interesting.

On a recommendation from Dr. Davis(Heart Scan Blog) I tried testing my BG every 20 minutes to get a response curve. I found I peak out at around the hour mark and I have yet to have it go up over 110. Yet to test on a true "cheat", but I will try that later(I forgot it at work after a long busy day at work so I couldn't test my popcorn treat last night).

After a bit of a break(12 days or so) I did my first HIT workout at Doug's 1 on 1 training in Greenville.

Workout(30min):

  • Tru Squat: Included 3 assisted reps/negatives.
  • MedX Leg Abductor:
  • MedX Leg Adductor
  • MedX Leg Press
  • MedX Leg Curl
  • MedX Leg Extension
  • Wall/Ball Static Hold
  • Nautilus Assist Pull Up
  • MedX Chest Press: Also did 3-4 negatives/assisted reps.
  • MedX Compound Row:
  • Push Ups: Negative only. Pushed up myself on 5 then struggled to get up with my elbows.
  • Negative Pull Ups: 8, 12 second negatives

  • I was up in weight or time under load on all except leg extension, but that isn't the main purpose of this post. One thing interesting to point out about that is that after doing this type of training for the last 2+ years I have yet to plateau on my progress. I have gotten stronger every week with either longer times under load or more weight. I suspect that plateaus that some see may be related to the skill of the movements involved coupled with a stimulus that is too weak to generate the adaptation desired.

    I did my BG before and after the workout, which was interesting. Waking: 99, as it is almost every morning I have checked. 30 minutes before the workout 105. 5 minutes after the workout: 110. It went up, which I believe makes sense. I always experience some stress knowing the workout discomfort coming and I think that is cortisol related. As for the workout it is not a surprise that glucose spilled into the blood in response to the heavy training. Reporting more on twitter(once I get back to work) for anyone who is interested.

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    Happy Birthday, Modern Paleo!

    By Diana Hsieh

    On this day one year ago, I launched Modern Paleo.

    Thanks to the help of a great slew of Objectivist paleo bloggers from OEvolve, and particularly the blog editor Christian Wernstedt, I'm really proud of this first year of blogging.

    I'm also delighted with the growth of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list and its associated blog carnival, The Paleo Rodeo. We have 126 members on the list, and more join each week.

    I've got some exciting plans for Modern Paleo's second year, so stay tuned!

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    Saturday, March 12, 2011

    The Objectivist Roundup & Rationally Selfish Webcast

    By Diana Hsieh

    As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I like to post some fresh links related to Objectivism from around the web for anyone interested in learning more about the philosophy.

    Objectivism is Ayn Rand's philosophy of this-worldly reason, egoism, and capitalism. Ayn Rand is best known as the author of the epic novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. As she explained:

    My philosophy, in essence, is the concept of man as a heroic being, with his own happiness as the moral purpose of his life, with productive achievement as his noblest activity, and reason as his only absolute. ("About the Author," Atlas Shrugged)
    So where can you find some fresh readings from an Objectivist perspective on the web?

    The Objectivist Roundup is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome, including posts on food and health.

    The Little Things hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in seeing the latest and best from Objectivist bloggers, go take a look!

    My own Rationally Selfish Webcast -- where I answer questions on practical ethics and living well -- will be tomorrow (Sunday) morning at 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET. You can submit and vote on questions, as well as watch the live webcast and join the chat, from this page: Rationally Selfish Webcast.

    If you're unable to attend the live webcast, you can listen to these webcasts later as NoodleCast podcasts by subscribing in iTunes to either the enhanced M4A format or the standard MP3 format.

    For in-depth commentary on culture and politics from an Objectivist perspective, I heartily recommend perusing The Objective Standard, a quarterly journal. Check out its current issue and past issues for articles on individual rights and law, philosophy, science and technology, business and economics, foreign policy and war, and more. Each issue offers one article for free, and I'd definitely recommend a subscription.

    For regular commentary on free market medicine -- and the perils of government controls and welfare -- visit Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine (FIRM). Check out its blog, We Stand FIRM and its extensive array of published articles.

    For more commentary on the politics of medicine from an Objectivist perspective, check out Americans for Free Choice in Medicine , The Lucidicus Project, and The Black Ribbon Project.

    For discussions of parenting by Objectivists, visit the joint blog and podcast of Modern Paleo contributors Jenn Casey and Kelly Elmore: Cultivating the Virtues. You can also find them on my OGrownups @ OList.com e-mail list.

    Finally, Ayn Rand Institute offers some unique resources on Objectivism. It hosts some free essays by Ayn Rand, such as The Objectivist Ethics and Man's Rights, as well as a huge library of recordings of Ayn Rand. You can also find commentary on current events by Objectivist intellectuals.

    That should keep you busy!

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    Friday, March 11, 2011

    The Paleo Rodeo #051

    By Diana Hsieh

    Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

    The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

    What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

    A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
    The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

    Here is this week's edition:
    paleo_rob presents Google Recipe Search is Pretty Damn Good posted at PaleOZ.

    Sara Hatch presents Getting the word out about The Foodee Project posted at Edible.

    Richard presents Weight Loss Progress Photos posted at Primal Fed.

    Kate Yoak presents Crossfit is hard! posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "Crossfit is hard. It's scary. Sometimes you just don't know whether you are going to make it through. This is my story of a day at crossfit."

    Ravi presents “Shunning” Whole Foods, (and you don’t have to be Amish) posted at DaiaSolGaia, saying, ""The Organic Elite" passing the GMO baton back to Monsanto was the last straw for us - viva Local Food! Co-op, Farmers Markets (the REAL ones) CSA's, Local Raw Milk and Meats!"

    Kris presents What is Vitamin K, and how does it work? posted at Kris Health Blog, saying, "A detailed article about the health benefits of Vitamin K, including what it is, how it works and what to do about it. Backed up by extensive research."

    Jessica Herschberg presents Because I Said So posted at Health Metamorphosis, saying, "Learn to create food rules for yourself to avoid using will-power."

    Kerri Heffel presents meatballs version 2.0 posted at the functional foodie, saying, "Ground bison in these meatballs were a great addition."

    Yael Grauer presents How To Lose Weight While Sitting On Your Ass and Eating Ice Cream (Or: Dallas Was Right) posted at Yael Writes, saying, "While not the ideal weight loss method, Yael finds that going to bed earlier not only negates the effects of additional junk food and no exercise on a Paleo diet, but is so effective that it goes beyond maintenance"

    Ryan presents How Much Does the Paleo Challenge Cost? posted at The Urban Cave - Chicago, saying, "We saved the receipts - and have the answer! We now know just how much it costs to eat paleo for a month; and the levers that can make it more or less."

    Anne presents Menu Planning - Does It Work For You? posted at Paleo on a Budget.

    Primal Kitchen's Family Grokumentarian presents Ways to Get You Kids Outside (and Keep'Em Busy Once They're Out!) posted at Primal Kitchen: A Family Grokumentary, saying, "Your kids don't need to already be super athletes to conquer a day outdoors - just interested in having fun. You only need a little bit of inspiration and some inexpensive tools to draw them outside."

    Nell Stephenson presents Sweeteners and Thickeners and Fillers, Oh, My! Not Really All That Paleo and NOT AT ALL NECESSARY! posted at TrainWithNellie.

    Julia Campbell presents cajun stew posted at the crankin' kitchen!, saying, "In honor of Mardi Gras, this cajun stew is jambalaya without the rice - let's get to the good stuff, huh?"

    J. Stanton presents The "Lipid Hypothesis" Has Officially Failed (Part 2 of many) posted at GNOLLS.ORG, saying, "Did you know that functional lifespan is actually DECREASING in America? We're living longer lives than ever...but we're spending them in a mobility scooter or on our deathbeds. Why?"

    Logan Marshall presents 7 Reasons Why You Should Cancel Your Gym Membership posted at Wild Movement.

    Wenchypoo presents "Look Ma--No Grains!" Noodles posted at Wisdom From Wenchypoo's Mental Wastebasket, saying, "This may already be old hat to many of you, but I'm thrilled to find it. Maybe some other readers are too!"

    Todd Dosenberry presents Recipe: Primal Meatloaf posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Have you enjoyed a paleo meatloaf yet? I FINALLY did a few days ago. I will be making this several times again. Enjoy!"

    Tyler presents Mainstream Finally Getting a F*cking Clue? Coconut Edition posted at Evolutionary Health Systems, saying, "The New York Times ran a piece on Coconut oil this week. Is the mainstream finally catching on?"

    NJ Paleo Girl presents lent means no meat! what’s a paleo girl to do? posted at NJ Paleo Girl.

    Dr. John presents Walking, the Ideal Exercise posted at Paleoterran, saying, "Guest blogger John Michael presents the benefits of walking and Thoreau's view of walking as "the enterprise and adventure of the day.""

    Melissa "Melicious" Joulwan presents NRNM: Go Cuckoo for Coconut (Oil) posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "As part of my National REAL Nutrition Month (Take THAT, ADA!), I posted a little love letter to coconut oil."

    Pepper Ruper presents Food addiction: Harder to kick than cocaine? posted at Paleo Pepper, saying, "Here I share the results of some research I did on dopamine signalling in both food and drug addictions. Turns out sugar is a hell of a monster."

    M presents First Farmers' Market Trip Post Whole9 Workshop posted at Nom Nom Paleo, saying, "After attending the Whole9 Foundations of Nutrition Workshop, I was much more mindful of my food purchases the next morning at the farmers' market. Bottom line: get good quality meat, lots of veggies, and SOME fruit."

    Lindsey presents Chicken Spaghetti Casserole posted at Enjoying Healthy Foods, saying, "This meal was a total accident but a great success. Spaghetti Squash with chicken and vegetables made a delicious casserole that the entire family enjoyed! Yours can too!"

    Crystal Meadows presents Is Paleo Extreme? posted at Against the Grain, saying, "Eat real food. What a radical concept!"

    Robin presents Orange Cranberry Paleo Muffins: Recipe Makeover posted at Everymom To Ironmom, saying, "This paleo muffin recipe has been a family favorite for when we need something easy to eat on the go. I just updated it and made it even better!"

    Tara presents Ghee Makes Everything Better posted at Tribe of Five, saying, "I love me some ghee. I want you to love you some ghee too."

    Tara Grant presents Make Your Own Beef Jerky posted at Primal Living, saying, "Part of being Primal is planning ahead and making your own food. So, I tried my hand at beef jerky. It was surprisingly easy. The results were amazing. It was hands down, the best beef jerky my husband and I have ever had."

    Paul Jaminet presents Welcome Jimmy Moore listeners! posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "I was interviewed by Jimmy Moore on the Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show this week, and this was my welcome page. If you're curious about our diet and how it came about, this is a good introduction."

    Dustin Sharp presents More Bad News for Ultra-Distance Cyclists posted at Paleo Vélo, saying, "Discusses recent study on heart problems in marathon runners"

    Ana Johnson presents Autoimmune Disease Rant posted at Whole Life Diets, Autoimmune diet, Registered Dietitian, Paleo.

    Kristy A. presents Southern Cooking Classic: Collard Greens posted at Feasting on Fitness, saying, "Healthy, hearty greens paired with bacon--this is a heavenly match you'll soon devour!"

    Travis Schefcik presents The Paleo Diet Guide You Can’t Live Without posted at Uncommon Wellness.

    Beth Mazur presents First draft: low-carb vs paleo vs Weston Price posted at Weight Maven, saying, "here's my first pass of a one-pager that compares these three popular diets ... your comments welcomed!"
    Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! This blog carnival has plenty of room to grow! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

    Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
    Enjoy!

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