Saturday, December 03, 2011

Video: Supporting Political Compromise on Legal Marijuana

By Diana Hsieh

In Sunday's Philosophy in Action Webcast, I discussed political compromise on legal marijuana. The question was:

When is it morally right or wrong to support political compromises? The marijuana legalization initiative for the 2012 Colorado ballot also specifies open-ended taxation that circumvents the protections of TABOR (the Taxpayer Bill of Rights). It specifies that the first $40 million raised goes to government schools. Both of these taxation items are compromises added to get voters to accept the marijuana legalization. Is it ethical to support more taxation to get more freedom from drug laws? Is it okay to circulate petitions to get this on the ballot so the voters can decide? More generally, when if ever should a person support political compromises that uphold some rights but violate others?
My answer, in brief:
With mixed legislation, you need to examine the good and the bad, with particular emphasis on precedents set by the law. Sometimes, like with this measure, you should support it because the good hugely outweighs the bad, but that's not always the case.
Here's the video of my full answer:
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All posted webcast videos can be found in the Webcast Archives and on my YouTube channel.

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