Saturday, October 30, 2010

Objectivist Roundup

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I post a link to "The Objectivist Roundup" every week. The "Objectivist Roundup" is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome.

3 Ring Binder hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in learning more about what Objectivists are writing and doing, check it out!

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Friday, October 29, 2010

The Paleo Rodeo #032

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Douglas Robb presents Lemon Pepper Crusted Lamb posted at Health Habits, saying, "This is what happens when a gourmet chef cooks Paleo."

John Durant presents Don't be a toaster: Why fractal geometry matters to your health posted at Hunter-Gatherer blogs.

Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Lindt's 90% posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "I finally got a hold of a bar of Lindt's 90% dark chocolate, and tasting it alongside the 85% variety I've found virtues that make it my plain chocolate of choice."

Aaron Fox presents The Cattail’s Outta the Bag posted at Mark's Daily Apple, saying, "Mark Sisson says we should all start eating bread."

Sara Hatch presents Recipe of the Week: Paleo Pumpkin Bisque posted at Edible.

Amy Kubal presents Tricky Treats... posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Ghosts, goblins, witches, monsters, zombies... And scariest of all CANDY!!!"

Patty Strilaeff presents Creepy Creatures of the Sea Soup posted at following my nose..., saying, "I put a Halloween spin on a Paleo version of seafood stew!"

Greg Perkins presents Tough Mudder: Dirty, Adventurous Fun! posted at Modern Paleo, saying, "Tammy and I put our functional fitness to the test in a PRISON BREAK! It involved scaling walls, running through the mountains, crawling under barbed wire and through dark tunnels and mud, swimming in freezing water and so on -- all while straining to stay ahead of the dogs and out of the search helicopter's sight! In other words, we took on the Tough Mudder, "the TOUGHEST one day event on the planet.""

Finn presents Paleo Cookies = Sex Wee posted at I WANT SOME FECKING CHIPS!, saying, "hope you like it guys :D"

Laurie Donaldson presents BokChoy, Cabbage, and Apple Hash (and Cornbread - gasp) posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "The cornbread is gluten-free, but skip it for 100% primality."

Kate Yoak presents Paleo: a gentle start posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "Advice I gave my father for how to start paleo gently and avoid the difficulties many of us encounter as our bodies adjust."

Nell Stephenson presents The Best Substitute For Spaghetti... posted at TrainWithNellie.

Yael Grauer presents Paleo Experiment: Days 1-7 posted at Yael Writes, saying, "Putting my money where my mouth is and doing strict Paleo for 30 days and documenting the results. This is 1-7."

Angelo Coppola presents Sweet Surprise! They Lied about the F in HFCS! posted at This Week in Paleo, saying, "This, along with other carb / sugar news, will be highlighted in next week's episode of This Week in Paleo."

Jean-Patrick Millette presents Carbs for thought posted at Primal Journal, saying, "What if a rise in insulin was not such a bad thing (as long as it's done intermittently)? What if the frequency at which we spike it today (compared to how often our ancestors spiked their insulin) is the reason people suffer from insulin resistance (and the common problems it gives : e.g diabetes)? What if paleoish carbs (no grains) were not bad ?"

Joe Berne presents A Primer on Intermittent Fasting posted at Karate Conditioning, saying, "An introductory article on intermittent fasting (from someone who's done it for more than 3 years)."

John Durant presents Book deal posted at Hunter-Gatherer blogs, saying, "Wohoo!"

Paul Jaminet presents Wheat Is A Cause of Many Diseases, I: Leaky Gut posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This is the first post in a series on how wheat causes autoimmune diseases."

Richard Nikoley presents Another Vegan ?Success Story? posted at Free The Animal, saying, "Go vegan, gain 100 pounds!"

paleo_rob presents Random Thoughts: Were our caveman ancestors right handed? posted at PaleOZ, saying, "A random thought on evolutionary theory: were our ancestors right-handed?"

Mike Fout / New Renaissance presents Perception: A Manifesto posted at Every Day A New Adventure, saying, "I had this post burning a whole in me for few days. I finally had a chance to let all out."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! I hope to see this blog carnival grow in the future. If you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Hearty Beef Stew

By Diana Hsieh


(Photo courtesy of su-lin)


This post hosts Modern Paleo's weekly open comment thread. Please feel free to post any random questions or remarks you have in the comments on this post. Personal attacks, pornographic material, commercial solicitations, and other inappropriate comments will be deleted.

Paleo Questions of the Week: What are your favorite ingredients for a hearty beef stew? Any special tips to make it extra-delicious?

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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Chocolate Review: Chocolove XOXOX (77% Cacao)

By Benjamin Skipper

After reading Mark's own review of five chocolates, I have been glad to have been given the opportunity to try out one of the brands on his list, Chocolove XOXOX (which has a cacao content of 77%). While it has a nice cutesy name making it appropriate for a romantic gift, I don't react particularly strong to this brand.

Most importantly, it seems as if the very flavor itself is on the fence. It isn't too sweet, but it isn't all that dark either. The dead center of sweet and dark just seems to take the edge off of its chocolatyness. As promised in previous post, I have been doing better to slow down my eatings of my chocolate and have even been making my bars last longer, so as to help me concentrate better on the nature and attributes of the chocolate rather than being an undiscriminating glutton. However, no matter how many tastings I allow of myself for this chocolate I just don't get much of a reaction from it. It's just not much of anything, though I agree with Mark's post that it may be a good introductory dark chocolate since it's neither too sweet nor bitter. The discriminating and experienced palate, however, might think this a "novice" chocolate.

On the negative side I absolutely detest the mouthfeel. It's the return of the crishy-crunchiness I hate, since I'd rather have an instant melt-in-your-mouth sensation, or at the very least a softer chocolate that easily snaps apart. I tried momentarily to let the chocolate sit in my mouth and melt, but it's stubborn to body heat and makes me feel like I'm sitting with a chocolate-flavored block in my mouth, what with how weak the flavor profile is.

Aesthetically, even the appearance of the bar isn't all that appetizing. Upon unwrapping, you'll notice in an instance that this bar has the appearance of all stereotypical chocolate bars as they appear in popular media: plain little square blocks with little outward distinguishing features. Not even stripes for texture! I don't know why so many different companies have such different policies, but I'd like to see much more attention paid to the actual appearance of the bar. Take the chocolate company Newtree for instance, which not only makes great tasting chocolate bars, like mint and ginger, but also makes their bars look beautifully artistic: Up close, you can see an imprint of the veins of a leaf. No, not a rendition of leaf veins as they are perceived to be; it looks as if they actually encased a leaf in the chocolate. With so delicate a design, such an appearance cannot help but enhance the eating experience. As such, it's disappointing when other chocolate companies don't make an effort to give their bars individuality, or do so lamely by putting simple shapes on their bars, such as lines and dots. Even the name of the company written in a fancy font would be satisfactory to me.

In conclusion, I consider the flavor profile of this bar to be weak -- probably due to my other dark chocolate experiences -- the mouthfeel to be overly crunchy, and the aesthetics of the bar to be lacking. I wouldn't mind eating this chocolate again if it were given to me, but I wouldn't purchase it.

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Monday, October 25, 2010

Tough Mudder: Dirty, Adventurous Fun!

By Greg Perkins

Tammy and I just did the Tough Mudder (NorCal), and it was a blast! Tough Mudder bills themselves as

the TOUGHEST one day event on the planet. This is not your average mud run or boring, spirit-crushing road race. It's Ironman meets Burning Man: our 7-12 mile obstacle courses are designed by British Special Forces to test all around toughness, strength, stamina, fitness, camaraderie, and mental grit. Forget about your finish time. ... Simply completing the event is a badge of honor.
All the machismo and marketing hype aside, we love new adventures. Hearing that this one amounted to dashing all over a ski hill sprinkled with nineteen military-style obstacles that we would get to play on, we knew we had to go check it out! Factor in doing it at elevation, an air temperature of 60 degrees or so, with water and ice among those obstacles, and that's pretty much irresistible for a pair of CrossFitters. ;^)

Costumes are strongly encouraged, though strangely there weren't a lot in evidence when we got there. No matter -- we were on a mission to maximize the fun! Rather than go with choices we could see in photos from past events, like some sort of Braveheart warrior thing, or natives from Avatar (or the sometimes super-risque ones that left a lot of skin exposed) we decided to hit it with an old-school prison-break theme! This earned us a lot of attention throughout the course: As we passed people or approached obstacle managers, they would often chuckle, making comments about Alcatraz, or how they could hear the dogs and that we should run faster. At one point, a couple of guys behind me were singing about workin' on the chain gang. Lots of people called out Hey, Convict!, asking what we did ("nothing, we're innocent!") and why we were running ("we were framed!"). And whenever the helicopter was hovering overhead capturing images, people commented about the search closing in which only increased the feeling of our making an escape -- like something out of a movie.

The course really did have a lot of fun twists! Here's the blow-by-blow. (Sorry for the length of this post; feel free to just skim and look at pictures. :^)

1. The start was a mob-dash straight down a ski slope right, after we all recited a little Pledge acknowledging that this was a challenge and not a race; that mudders help each other out; and that mudders don't whine ("kids whine!"). I think this last is clever of them, given how likely it is for hiccups to happen in a complicated event like this. They called this part the Braveheart Charge ("Charge into battle with 5000 fellow Tough Mudders. Battle cries essential.")

2. After running back uphill for a while, we hit the Kiss of Mud ("Eat dirt as you crawl on your belly under wire set only 8 inches from the ground.")  Yeah! A low-crawl through cold mud, under barbed wire -- that'll take the shine off your uniform!

3. After that came the Death March ("Feel the burn early on as you charge straight up this red graded ski run right to the top of the mountain.") Burning legs and lungs, check. But their description forgot to mention the descent that precedes the ascent: steep, switchbacking, single-track, winding through a field of boulders. (You can see how the single-track aspect  bottled people up a bit in the picture on the right.)


4. Once we got to the top, we were greeted by Boa Constrictor ("Prove you can cope with cold dark confined spaces and a few nasty scratches with our specially designed Tough Mudder tire tunnels.") This was basically some lengths of corrugated culvert pipes connected with a bend so you couldn't see light until you were halfway through them. And they were tight enough that we had to basically drag ourselves through with our arms.

5. After some more running, we came up on Dragon Wheels ("Just when you thought it was all running and crawling, try your hand a climbing. Claw up and over these three giant spools lined end to end. Stop complaining.") I got a little clumsy on these -- couldn't swing my legs to the side since the vertical parts made it too narrow, and there were Mudders doing their best to be helpful to other Mudders, which was cool, but basically put them in my way. So I flailed going over and landed in an undignified heap on the far side.

6. Next came The Gauntlet ("Prepare to feel like you're at a South American political demonstration as you get high pressure hosed from both sides as you run though Bear Valley's half pipe.") This was awesome, just the kind of thing you'd expect out of Tough Mudder: running up a really muddy halfpipe, getting hit by snowmaking machines blasting water at you from both sides. Refreshing!


7. That was followed by Cliffhanger ("Grab onto anything you can as you scramble back to the top of the mountain up this nasty slippery and very steep black run.") This was an even steeper ascent that was just loooong -- I hit my threshold and was powerwalking a bunch of it, but Tammy just ran all the way up. Enduro-trail-running badass! (A Marine who had just limped to the top was giving her big props for making what's on the right look easy. :^)

(Something about climbing up a glacier wall was supposed to happen about now, but we didn't notice any 100-foot ice sheets that needed scaling... not that we were worried about this at the time, as the course was basically a blur of activity anyway.)

8. We came up on a crowd of people all bottled up, briefly wondering what we should do and why people weren't moving. Turns out it was the Swamp Stomp ("Get stuck in with our knee-high energy-sapping trademark Tough Mudder thick mud.") Seriously, you could lose a shoe running through this stuff! The wait wasn't too long, and they kept us entertained by letting a handful of folks try to demonstrate their best bellyflops into it.


9. Next was the Kentucky Derby ("These eight foot jumps are too much for even the biggest of thoroughbreds, so you'll need teamwork and camaraderie to get yourself and your fellow Mudders over these giant beams.") No kidding -- the top of that big, smooth beam was way up there!

10. After some more dashing, we all clambered over a schoolbus at the School of Tough Knocks ("Be the kelly Slater of bus surfing as you climb cargo nets to the top of this yellow beauty just to make the 12 foot jump back down again.") Looks like they skipped the jump down in favor of cargo nets on both sides.

11. Then there was more mud, and we hit the Berlin Walls ("Show team spirit and camaraderie as you work with other Tough Mudders to scale our series of 12 foot high walls, tough enough when dry, but really fun when wet.") Now it was Tammy's turn to be a little clumsy -- she hit that slick white board on the front side and went down hard, rocking and holding her leg like Peter in that recurring joke in Family Guy. Walk it off, Mudder!

We fled the scene and soon arrived at a manmade reservoir way up on top of the mountain. Approaching it from the far side in this photo, there were four ropes that people were using to climb down to the water for...

12. The Underwater Tunnels ("Bob underneath the obstacles on the surface of the water as your head shrinks to the size of a walnut.") Yeeeeahh!! Swim across, going under the floating barrels. Okay, I'll just say that swimming in a cotton jumpsuit isn't the best idea, but the challenge was really the temperature: apparently it snowed the day before and the water was 40 degrees! We could seriously feel the clock ticking the entire time we were in it. When I first waded in up to my chest, my diaphragm stopped cooperating on that whole breathing thing, so I backed up to knee-depth to let the shock settle in a bit and hit it again. Unfortunately, Tammy (who was already working on enjoying the cold) thought something was going really wrong because I was suddenly coming back at her, and I wasn't able to speak very well to explain what I was up to.

13. After swimming across and climbing up the other side, we were sent right back in with Greased Lightening ("Have some fun sliding down the hill, real Tough Mudders go head first back into the pond.") Woo!!  That really was fun! Well, at least until we hit the freezing water a second time and had to swim around a boat out there before climbing out again. Oh, and getting in the water wasn't only unpleasant because of the cold: it absolutely REEKED. We're pretty sure it was the smell of a thousand years of fermented goose poop.

14. Dashing away, I noticed that I couldn't feel a few of my toes and fingers, and Tammy was saying that she couldn't feel her feet, so at this point we were looking forward to anything that might warm us back up. That turned out to be Hold Your Wood ("Make like a lumberjack and drag a log up a ski slope and then try to keep your footing on the way back down."). Grabbing a couple of good-sized ones (the longer, shared ones were all gone), we headed straight downhill. Eventually there was a turnaround, and we all headed right back up! Sure, sounds less than stimulating, but I'm pretty sure everyone was enjoying warming up at this point.


15. Next up was Devil's Beard ("Try as you might you will get caught like a fly in a spider's web time and time again in our annoyingly low cargo nets."). This was just another quick low-crawl, but under a big cargo net. Meh.

16. Running along the ridge at this point, we arrived at a long snow/wind break co-opted for the next event: Fenced Off ("Show your mental toughness as you cross back and forth four times over this 8 foot fence."). This actually felt a lot like part of a CrossFit workout: You go over on this segment, come back on the next, and continued doing that until you run out of fence. We crossed the fence sixteen times in total.


17. Continuing along the ridge as we headed down, it was starting to feel like it might be ending. Sure enough, that's when the Mystery Obstacle showed up, which was supposed to be the last thing before the finish. It turned out to be a table filled with shots of the world's nastiest, most badass hot sauce. Or so they said. As best we could tell it was only watered-down sriracha sauce, so maybe this was supposed to be more of a test of mental grit or whatever (willingness to just throw back the "fearsome" stuff and move on).

18. More winding downhill, then finally -- a little more than two hours after starting -- we hit the finish line of Fire Walker ("Plain and simple, run through our blazing kerosene soaked straw. Expect flames at least 4 foot high.") Looks like the Forest Service nixed the flaming bales of straw, because it was a gauntlet of propane flames that marked the end. Woo! High fives!!

The event was of course followed by the all-important party, where everyone was drinking beer and listening to a decent band. The organizers noticed our costumes and pulled us up on stage to be interviewed for a while (and we're pretty sure we would have won the Best Costume contest if we hadn't missed it by being off at the porta-potties to relieve SOMEONE's tiny chick-bladder ;^).

Unfortunately, we were driving home the next day and couldn't take the organizers up on their challenge for everyone who did it on Saturday to return and do it again on Sunday. That would have been a hoot! Next time.

We are seriously impressed with a relatively new and inexperienced organization putting on so large and complicated (and well-designed) an event, and seeing it all go so smoothly! That's not easy. The bottom line is that if you're reasonably fit, you'll have a great time doing Tough Mudder. (And if you're a CrossFitter, you can probably show up with no event-specific preparation and turn in a strong performance. :^) Just be sure to wear a costume -- the people in costumes have way more fun!

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Sunday, October 24, 2010

Abortion Rights and Health Care Choice

By Diana Hsieh

Ari Armstrong and I published an op-ed on Colorado's Amendment 62 (personhood for zygotes) and Amendment 63 (health care choice) in Friday's Denver Daily News: A62, A63 reveal ideological rifts.

Our article observes that many groups either oppose or endorse both Amendments 62 and 63. Yet these measures are based on opposite political premises. Amendment 62 (personhood) violates rights, while Amendment 63 (health care choice) protects them. The article then explains how both the entitlement left and religious right advocate a false view of rights. And it sketches a secular view of rights whereby each person is left free to act by his own judgment and for his own life and happiness.

Go read the whole thing!

For more information on Amendment 62, see Ari Armstrong's and my policy paper: The 'Personhood' Movement Is Anti-Life: Why It Matters that Rights Begin at Birth, Not Conception.

For more information on Amendment 63, visit the Independence Institute and Patient Power Now.

Also, Paul has been busy advocating free market medicine via FIRM: Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine. Here's his two most recent endeavors:

Enjoy!

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Saturday, October 23, 2010

Objectivist Roundup

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I post a link to "The Objectivist Roundup" every week. The "Objectivist Roundup" is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome.

Reepicheep's Coracle hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in learning more about what Objectivists are writing and doing, check it out!

Read more...

Friday, October 22, 2010

The Paleo Rodeo #031

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Jean-Patrick Millette presents Ah these food junkies? Sugar is more addictive than Cocaine posted at Primal Journal, saying, "A science post about how our pre-existing preference for sugar can be dangerous when you feed yourself processed foods."

Benjamin Skipper presents Chocolate Review: Dagoba's Beaucoup Berries (74% Cacao) posted at Musing Aloud, saying, "This is my review for Dagoba's 74% cacao Beaucoup Berries dark chocolate. It delivers on its fruity promise and offers a pleasant texture inconsistency between smooth and squishy, so I definitely would buy it again. I recommend it."

Amy Kubal presents It Doesn't Take A Rocket Scientist... posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Are you over thinking things??"

Kerri Heffel presents my paleo story posted at the functional foodie.

Nell Stephenson presents Missing Your Afternoon Mocha? Cinnamon to the Rescue! posted at TrainWithNellie.

Josephine Svendblad presents Coconut Oil Fudge - Nutty Kitchen Style posted at Nutty Kitchen, saying, "This is a must try and a must have. Looking forward to hearing how yours turned out."

Travis Schefcik presents 5 Easy Steps To The Paleo Diet Lifestyle posted at Uncommon Wellness.

Patty Strilaeff presents Coconut Curry Collards and Chard ... and not Catfish posted at following my nose....

Joe Berne presents Stupid Motivational Tricks posted at Karate Conditioning, saying, "Some stupid things that, nevertheless, can motivate you to stick to a diet or exercise plan."

Nicole Markee - Astrogirl presents Pull-Ups posted at Astrogirl, saying, "I made a 55 second long xtranormal.com movie about pull-ups and CrossFit. OK, mostly about pull-ups. :)"

Dennis Ryan presents Quick Paleo Chili posted at Paleo Eats, saying, "Just a quick paleo chili recipe I made this week, tasted so good I had to share (and remember for myself next time :)"

Paul Jaminet presents Guess the Book Cover posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Our book is about to come out, and for fun we had a "guess the book cover" contest. See if you can guess our book cover."

Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! I hope to see this blog carnival grow in the future. If you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Favorite Vegetable

By Diana Hsieh


(Photo courtesy of marcp_dmoz)


This post hosts Modern Paleo's weekly open comment thread. Please feel free to post any random questions or remarks you have in the comments on this post. Personal attacks, pornographic material, commercial solicitations, and other inappropriate comments will be deleted.

Paleo Questions of the Week: What is your favorite vegetable? Has that changed since eating paleo?

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Monday, October 18, 2010

Reminder: Modern Paleo's E-mail Lists

By Diana Hsieh

In case you'd not noticed... Modern Paleo is the home of three specialized e-mail lists. They are not for debate, but instead for friendly discussion and sharing of useful information. These lists are not moderated, but members who violate the very basic rules will be subject to moderation, if not unsubscribed.

  • PaleoBloggers: PaleoBloggers is an informal private mailing list for bloggers who adhere to and advocate a broadly paleo approach to diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. Its basic purpose is to facilitate communication about matters of mutual interest -- such as blogworthy links, the paleo carnival, upcoming events, posts of interest, and best blogging practices. Its broader purpose is to help paleo bloggers more effectively advocate and promote the paleo approach. Click here for more information.

  • PaleoThyroid: PaleoThyroid is an informal private mailing list for adherents of a broadly paleo diet with diagnosed or suspected thyroid disease. Its basic purpose is to facilitate the sharing of information, resources, and experiences about thyroid problems amongst independent-minded people already eating paleo. Click here for more information.

  • SousVide: SousVide is an informal private mailing list for people who cook sous vide, particularly home cooks. Its basic purpose is to facilitate the sharing of information, resources, recipes, and tips related to cooking sous vide. (This list is not limited to paleo-eaters.) Click here for more information.
These lists are hosted on Google Groups. You can choose to receive list messages as individual e-mails, to receive a daily summary or digest, or to read messages on the web. You can also subscribe to the list's RSS feed. You need a Google Account to join, although you can use any e-mail address.

I hope to create some new Modern Paleo e-mail lists, although I probably won't be able to do that for a few months. Whenever that happens, I'll announce them here.

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Sunday, October 17, 2010

Gus Van Horn PJM OpEd: "The Silent Killer"

By Paul Hsieh

The October 15, 2010 edition of PajamasMedia published Gus Van Horn's latest OpEd, "Government Regulation of the Economy Is the 'Silent Killer'". Here's the opening:

We've all heard public service announcements about one disease or another, calling it the "silent killer" and warning of horrible consequences for its unsuspecting victims. A similar silent killer is on the loose now, but there are no such ads. You also won't hear about it on the news. Nevertheless, millions of Americans are unknowing victims of this silent killer right now.

You are probably one of them...
(Read the full text of "Government Regulation of the Economy Is the 'Silent Killer'".)

The "silent killer" analogy is apt in so many ways. We'll never know what sorts of amazing goods and services ordinary people could have created (to the betterment of themselves and the rest of us), if they had only been left alone to live honestly, produce, and trade with others.

Thank you, Gus, for another fine OpEd!

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Saturday, October 16, 2010

Objectivist Roundup

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I post a link to "The Objectivist Roundup" every week. The "Objectivist Roundup" is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome.

The Little Things hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in learning more about what Objectivists are writing and doing, check it out!

Read more...

Friday, October 15, 2010

The Paleo Rodeo #030

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
John Durant presents Do you take your coffee like John Wayne or Mary Poppins? posted at Hunter-Gatherer blogs.

Sara Hatch presents Recipe of the Week: Balsamic Glazed Chicken posted at Edible.

mark owen-ward presents Eat fat! posted at new habit.

Autsajder presents Fibromyalgia and Paleo posted at I, the paleo autsajder.

Amy Kubal presents Killing Cancer... posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "If you or someone you know is battling or concerned about Cancer - this is a MUST read!!"

Todd Dosenberry presents Is The Primal/Paleo Diet The Best For Every Living Individual? posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "People thrive on a variety of diets. But, if someone who is vegan started to eat a primal/paleo diet would they feel even better?"

paleo_rob presents Training Less to Train Healthy! (and melt the fat off!) posted at PaleOZ, saying, "Put an end to chronic cardio!"

MMichael presents Before Mark Sisson: Aajonus Vonderplanitz And The Primal Diet® posted at Nutrition and Physical Regeneration.

Yael Grauer presents My Paleo Experiment (Or: 30 Days Without Ice Cream) posted at Yael Writes.

Nell Stephenson presents Post Race Paleo... posted at TrainWithNellie.

Paul Jaminet presents Are the Boston Red Sox Malnourished? posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post argues that a recent rash of injuries to the Boston Red Sox is due to faulty diet advice embraced by the team."

Dennis Ryan presents Making Banana Pancakes! posted at Paleo Eats, saying, "Great recipe for gluten-free banana pancakes and avoid the common pitfalls such as sogy, unbinding, burnt pancakes!"

Richard Nikoley presents Vegan Zealots Censor Criticism of The China Study on Wikipedia posted at Free The Animal, saying, "A story about guardians of the faith."

Kate Yoak presents Paleo pregnancy posted at Cave Kitchen, saying, "Battling pregnancy symptoms, carb cravings and learning my big paleo lessons."

Marc presents Primal Sliders? posted at Feel Good Eating, saying, "I think you will be pleasantly surprised how tasty this little recipe is. Let me know what you think."

Laurie Donaldson presents Just a Little Rant posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Wasn't sure if I wanted to post this, but sometimes you just have to let it out..."

Kristy A. presents What To Drink Part 5: Chocolate Milk for Recovery? posted at Feasting on Fitness, saying, "Back again for another segment on our continuing journey through beverages, today we look at chocolate milk for post-workout recovery. Does it really do a body good?"

Josephine Svendblad presents Our Sedona Primal Anniversary Weekend posted at Nutty Kitchen, saying, "Food, wine and hiking experiences of our anniversary weekend. Come and visit this great place. We love Sedona!"

Angelo Coppola presents Paleo Art: Banksy and the Paleo Spirit posted at This Week in Paleo, saying, "If you haven't seen Banksy's evolutionary art, I think you'll really enjoy it!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! I hope to see this blog carnival grow in the future. If you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Humane Treatment of Animals

By Diana Hsieh


(Photo courtesy of through-this-window)


This post hosts Modern Paleo's weekly open comment thread. Please feel free to post any random questions or remarks you have in the comments on this post. Personal attacks, pornographic material, commercial solicitations, and other inappropriate comments will be deleted.

Paleo Questions of the Week: Does humane treatment and slaughtering of livestock influence your purchases of meat? Why or why not?

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Tuesday, October 12, 2010

How Farm Animals Should Behave

By Valda Redfern

Last week, on a glorious autumn afternoon, I walked to my local farm shop - about three miles across the fields.  As I ambled down the farm driveway, I took the opportunity to inspect the pigs and chickens.

The pig pen was a large area of bare soil, big enough for a small herd to run about in, with little pig huts in the middle.  Some of the pigs were running - they seemed to be playing, making mad dashes at one another and then veering away at the last moment.  As I watched, one snuffled the soil and then shoved his snout into it, digging and snorting with every appearance of enjoyment, rather like a dog unearthing a bone.  All the pigs looked lean and agile.

A little further down the drive I came to the two chicken coops.  As I gazed at the first, the whole flock ran to the fence to get a look at me, jostling and clucking.  Maybe they were just hoping to be fed, but they seemed intensely inquisitive.  The chickens in the next coop behaved in just the same way, so I took a photo of them.  They were as spry as the pigs, feathers glossy, eyes bright.



This week I took a different route and surprised a bullock dining apart from the rest of the herd. He was wary of me, but I didn't put him off his feed for long, and he soon went back to chomping at a tussock of grass. He was clean, vigorous and alert - a healthy animal, no more stressed than he needed to be, free to graze and free to run.

The chickens might have been better off with a few trees in their environment, and I don't know exactly what either they or the pigs got to eat, or whether the bullock's grazing was supplemented with other feed; but all the animals I saw on my country walks behaved like healthy animals.

These animals exist to feed human beings. So do the listless animals on factory farms. Nowadays the only ones I care to eat are those raised in environments suited to their natures.

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Monday, October 11, 2010

My Dairy Experiment

By Diana Hsieh

For the whole month of September, I ate no dairy whatsoever. No milk, no kefir, no cream, no butter, no cheese, no yogurt. I only slipped up once with some cheese, very early in the month.

My purpose was to test a more strict paleo diet. I know that many people have problems with dairy, and those problems only become apparent after removing it from the diet for some weeks, then re-introducing it.

I didn't notice any difference during my dairy-free September, so I began eating dairy again in early October. I started when I was visiting my parents' last weekend. For those few days, I didn't just eat a bit of dairy: I chowed down on it. I had cream in my tea. I ate a tub of greek yogurt. I had butter on my vegetables. And I ate more cheese than reasonable.

Can you guess what happened?

NOTHING! I experienced zero ill effects. I didn't even feel any different. Heck, I even came back from the four-day trip a pound lighter.

Loren Cordain might be right that dairy has pernicious effects on the human body. Moreover, clearly many people don't tolerate dairy and they ought to eliminate it from their diet. Yet I've seen no evidence of that in my own case -- in contrast to the major benefits that I've experienced from eliminating grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils from my diet. Hence, I plan to continue eating dairy in limited quantities.

My dairy consumption will largely consist of cream in various forms -- particularly cream in my tea and in my scrambled eggs. (That's what I missed most in my experiment. Coconut milk works surprisingly well in scrambled eggs, but it's not quite the same.) I'll cook with butter on occasion too, in addition to bacon grease and coconut oil. And I'll eat some cheese, but I won't make it a staple.

I've given up my remaining 1/2 gallon per week cowshare, as I'm just not consuming enough milk (or rather, kefir) to make the hassle worthwhile. Right now, I have four gallons of kefir in the frige to drink at my leisure. After that's gone, I can make more from a local source of minimally pasteurized goat milk, if I want to do that.

Overall, I'm glad that I did the experiment, but I'm even more glad to be able to eat dairy again!

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Sunday, October 10, 2010

Amit Ghate PJM OpEd: Values and the Defense of Freedom

By Paul Hsieh

Note: This post is part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays.]

The October 9, 2010 PajamasMedia has published Amit Ghate's OpEd, "Values and the Defense of Freedom".

In it, he responds to the question, "Is faith necessary for defending natural rights, or is reason sufficient?" Here is the opening:

In the wake of the recent Values Voter Summit, a worrisome question arises: will the Tea Parties or a reformed GOP be able to champion limited government and fiscal responsibility, without also importing the religious right’s so-called "social values"?

HotAir's Allahpundit raises this issue, noting that speakers at the summit repeatedly asserted the idea that limited government must ultimately be based on religious beliefs -- on the existence of a "Big God." Uncomfortable with these assertions and searching for a better, secular defense of freedom, Allahpundit asks how Objectivists (adherents of Ayn Rand's philosophy) would respond.

It's a perceptive question. Though many recognize Rand as a stalwart defender of freedom, few appreciate how radically her defense differs from that of traditional religionists. Key to her innovative approach is an original conception of values and morality -- one which ultimately puts her at odds with much of the religious program...
(Read the full text of "Values and the Defense of Freedom".)

Congratulations, Amit!

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Saturday, October 09, 2010

Objectivist Roundup

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I post a link to "The Objectivist Roundup" every week. The "Objectivist Roundup" is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome.

Sacred Ego hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in learning more about what Objectivists are writing and doing, check it out!

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Friday, October 08, 2010

The Paleo Rodeo #029

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
paleo_rob presents 10min Paleo Breakfasts–For those of us on the go! posted at PaleOZ, saying, "Some quick paleo breakfast ideas! Yum!"

John Durant presents Interview at Birthday Shoes posted at Hunter-Gatherer blogs.

Todd Dosenberry presents High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Is Fine In Moderation… Wait, What?! posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "High fructose corn syrup is in virtually every processed food. Its a heavy contribution to all our health problems in todays world. Yet, the corn refiners association claims it is "fine in moderation." Ok, but what is moderation??"

Adam Farrah presents Healthy is the New Skinny, Too? posted at PracticalPaleolithic.com, saying, "Blog post about the importance of local organic food and small farms."

Frank Hagan presents Twilight Zone of Diet Studies posted at Low Carb Age, saying, "There's a signpost up ahead ... the Twilight Zone of diet studies."

Amy Kubal presents Time To Get Off The "SoFAS"! posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Are you stuck on SoFAS???"

Nell Stephenson presents Paleo on the Plane to Kona! posted at TrainWithNellie.

Dan Gregory presents Frenched Bone-in Ribeye; random/scattered updates posted at The Red Pill.

Todd Dosenberry presents How Do You Deal With Non Primal Food In Social Gatherings? posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "When you are at a social gathering and the food that is available is not at all primal/paleo it can be tough to hold back. How do you deal with these situations?"

Laurie Donaldson presents Happy Pig Sausage and Peppers posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "If this meal was any indication, seeking out pastured pork is definitely worth it!"

Nicole Markee presents Paleo Diets and Their Value posted at Astrogirl, saying, "Robb Wolf + what I'm eating currently and why."

Angelo Coppola presents Paleo Recipe: Fresh Pesto posted at This Week in Paleo, saying, "If you've got some extra basil in the garden, or just want to try a delicious way to enjoy pesto, here's our recipe -- complete with pics and some serving suggestions."

Josephine Svendblad presents Andy Deas Breakfast Special: Sausage and Beef in Coconut Milk posted at Nutty Kitchen, saying, "We borrowed and modified this recipe from the Norcal Strength & Conditioning site. Thank you Andy Deas (and Katie) for the great idea!"

Paul Jaminet presents A Sample Meal: Salmon and Mashed Sweet Potato posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "This post shows a typical meal on our diet."

Richard Nikoley presents T. Colin Campbell: Scientist or Propagandist? posted at Free The Animal, saying, "You be the judge. Thursday afternoon, 40 comments & counting. Lots of excellent judgment going on. Someone said once: Judge and prepare to be judged. But I can't seen to recall who. :)" [Note from Diana: Yup, that would be Ayn Rand!]
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! I hope to see this blog carnival grow in the future. If you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

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Question of the Week: Dairy Consumption

By Diana Hsieh


(Photo courtesy of sheffield_tiger)


This post hosts Modern Paleo's weekly open comment thread. Please feel free to post any random questions or remarks you have in the comments on this post. Personal attacks, pornographic material, commercial solicitations, and other inappropriate comments will be deleted.

Paleo Questions of the Week: Do you eat dairy? If so, how much, what form, and why? If not, why not?

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Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Chocolate Review: Endangered Species' 70% Cacao with Goldenberry and Lucuma

By Benjamin Skipper

This bar marks the last of my supply of Endangered Species' "Organic Health" dark chocolates, and you know from my two other reviews (1, 2) that I've been overall displeased with what I've tasted. So far the bars have either tasted like overly sweet milk chocolate or sickeningly sweet milk chocolate, with the individual flavor players muted. Thankfully though, Endangered Species' 70% cacao with goldenberry & lucuma has proven to be the exception.

I was fully expecting it to taste like milk chocolate like the others, but it isn't overly sweet and one can taste at least one of the individual flavors (goldenberry I estimate). I can't tell whether or not my estimation of the sweetness matches the 70% bitterness of the cacao, but at least I can say it tastes dark enough like it's supposed to and isn't overly sweet. The sweetness of the other two organic bars was imposing and made me procrastinate on finishing them; in fact, I still haven't finished the one with acai berry, cacao nibs, and yacon since it's so unappealingly sweet. This bar seems to toe the line and may be desirable for those who still maintain a sweet tooth but are trying to consume bitter chocolate.

The flavor profile is quite interesting. It tastes like dark chocolate with raisins, an oddity since there are no raisins. I assume that the goldenberry simply has a similar flavor profile to raisins, much like how I think goji berries taste like a blend of oranges and cranberries. Keeping in consideration the bar's moderately acceptable sugar content, I'd consider this a wonderful substitute for Raisinets. The lucuma, however, I do not think I can detect.

The mouthfeel of this bar is about the same as most other Endangered Species' line: Crunchy and slow to melt, but I'm not complaining. It is only when multiple bars share similar flavors do I desire to have different mouthfeels available, much like the difference between Lindt and ES.

Overall, I like this bar, particularly because I was once a huge fan of Raisinets, but I'm not too terribly impressed. Given a limited amount of money I would still opt for Endangered Species' mint, New Tree's ginger, Lindt's 85% , and perhaps Endangered Species' cherry.

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Monday, October 04, 2010

Chocolate Review: Endangered Species' 70% with Cocao Nibs, Yacon & Acai

By Benjamin Skipper

The bar tasted this time is Endangered Species' 70% dark chocolate with cocao nibs, yacon & acai. I never had cocao nibs or yacon before, but I know I love acai berries, so I had high hopes for this bar. To date this has been the biggest disappointment I have faced in my chocolate eating. It tastes almost exactly like the version with goji berry, pecans, and maca. The only real difference I can detect is that the present variety doesn't taste sickeningly sweet, but it still does taste like overly sweet milk chocolate nonetheless.

The biggest problem I see is that the flavors all fuse together in a way that eradicates their individuality, so while I know what acai berries taste like from having drank their juice before I could not isolate their flavor contribution. I thought for sure cocao nibs and yacon would add an unfamiliar dimension, but alas, no individuality! That's a real shame because I know that acai berries at least have a very unique and wonderful flavor that is so uncommon that many people may have never tasted it, and to cloak its individuality for those who actually want to try it is an injustice. I don't care about its health benefits, whether over or understated, I just think they taste like dynamite.

Unless Endangered Species wants to tout its organic line just for its nutritional benefits rather than unique flavor blends, I think ES should segregate these ingredients to give them their own podiums. They could, for instance, resist blending the ingredients together and instead incorporate them into the chocolate in inconsistent pieces, much like they did with the fruit flesh in their raspberry bar. Or maybe, say, they could utilize an extract of one ingredient and then add the others as chunks. For example, chocolate with acai extract and yacon and cocao nibs bits.

All in all, I just think the acai berry deserves its own bar. Other fruits do, so why does this berry need to play with others? Even cacao nibs has its own, though I haven't tried it. If Wikipedia is to be trusted, the flavor description makes yacon sound like it too deserves its own bar. Since these flavors are so uncommonly consumed, what better way to introduce them than in isolation?

I'll be one to finish the bar I've started, but I'm not going to buy or eat it again. It's simply too sweet tasting and eradicates the individuality of its major players.

Keeping track of things, I see my wish list of desired chocolates is growing, though I don't know whether they're being produced or not. In the future I'd like to see, whether by Endangered Species or another company, 70% cocao or higher chocolates that feature in isolation: apricots, peaches, goji berries, acai berries, strawberries, yacon, and tart apples.

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Sunday, October 03, 2010

Hsieh PJM OpEd: "2010: Dawn of the Terran Empire?"

By Paul Hsieh

PajamasMedia has just published my short, tongue-in-cheek piece, "2010: Dawn of the Terran Empire?"

My theme is that we must have entered a bizarre political parallel universe if Democrats are now running on how they voted against universal health care, and France is now telling us that we're being too soft on our enemies.

Enjoy!

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Saturday, October 02, 2010

Objectivist Roundup

By Diana Hsieh

As part of Modern Paleo's weekend schedule of blogging on Objectivism on Saturdays and free market politics on Sundays, I post a link to "The Objectivist Roundup" every week. The "Objectivist Roundup" is a weekly blog carnival for Objectivists. Contributors must be Objectivists, but posts on any topic are welcome.

Rational Jenn hosted this week's Objectivist Roundup. If you're interested in learning more about what Objectivists are writing and doing, check it out!

Read more...

Friday, October 01, 2010

The Paleo Rodeo #028

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
paleo_rob presents Useful Online Primal and Paleo Tools posted at PaleOZ.

Todd Dosenberry presents Are Green Beans Primal or Paleo? Do You Eat Them? Are They Healthy For Us? posted at Toad's Primal Journey, saying, "Green Beans are technically a legume but they are quite different than your traditional bean. So, I ask and answer the question myself... are green beans primal or paleo? Are they ok to eat? Answer yourself by leaving a comment!"

John Durant presents Robb Wolf signs books like a wild animal posted at Hunter-Gatherer, saying, "Awesome release party with Robb Wolf"

Frank Hagan presents Paleo Diets posted at Low Carb Age, saying, "What is the value of determining what the actual paleolithic diet was? A new study models several possible paleolithic diets, and makes a common sense recommendation."

Amy Kubal presents The Price of a Pound... posted at Fuel As Rx, saying, "Is It Worth the "Weight"??"

Nell Stephenson presents Healthy, Paleo Shopping - For Those Who DON'T Like a List posted at TrainWithNellie.

Travis Schefcik presents The Paleo Diet Is For Everyone (Not Just CrossFitters) posted at Uncommon Wellness.

Laurie Donaldson presents Vegetable Ragu Soup with Cheese posted at Food for Primal Thought, saying, "Cold weekend coming up on the East Coast. This soup is just the thing to warm you up!"

Jean-Patrick Millette presents Is our community becoming a religious movement à la veganism? posted at Primal Journal, saying, "A post about the need to question and debate everything."

Joe Berne presents More on Paleo eating posted at Karate Conditioning, saying, "Some practical advice on incorporating paleo eating into your diet."

Nicole Markee presents Stewing Hens posted at Astrogirl, saying, "If you've never tried a stewing hen for soup or other low and slow cooking, you should! To find one, ask your pastured egg producer."

Josephine Svendblad presents Demystify Okra: Okra and Ground Beef in Indian Spices posted at Nutty Kitchen, saying, "This dish is brought to you by Henry, who wanted to be the first in the line up of demystifying Okra. The husband likes to cook and create too! :-)"

Suzi presents Cleaning House posted at Winter Herbs, saying, "These are a few simple tips for creating a kit to help with maintaining a clean home, with a bit less waste & chemicals."

Angelo Coppola presents New Junk Food Battleground: the Web posted at This Week in Paleo, saying, "Will be talking more about junk food marketing practices with regards to children in Episode 5 of This Week in Paleo. :)"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! I hope to see this blog carnival grow in the future. If you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Finally, you can find all of the blogs of the PaleoBloggers on this continuously-updated list:
Enjoy!

Read more...

Question of the Week: Most-Eaten Meat

By Diana Hsieh


(Photo courtesy of wiredwitch)


This post hosts Modern Paleo's weekly open comment thread. Please feel free to post any random questions or remarks you have in the comments on this post. Personal attacks, pornographic material, commercial solicitations, and other inappropriate comments will be deleted.

Paleo Question of the Week: What kind of meat do you eat most often -- and why?

Read more...

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