Saturday, January 24, 2015

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 25 January 2015: Q&A on Ultrahazardous Activities, Declining Gift Solicitations, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 25 January 2015.
  • Question 1: The Regulation of Ultrahazardous Activities: Would the government of a free society issue bans/regulations to prevent harmful activity? At the turn of the 20th century it was common to use cyanide gas to fumigate buildings. Although it was well-known that cyanide gas was extremely poisonous and alternatives were available, its use continued and resulted in a number of accidental deaths due to the gas traveling through cracks in walls and even in plumbing. With the development of better toxicology practices, these deaths were more frequently recognized for what they were and at the end of summer in 1825 the NYC government banned its use. In this and other situations, it was recognized that the substance in question was extremely poisonous and could only be handled with the most extreme care – care that was rarely demonstrated. The question is this: Should the government step in and ban the substance from general use or should it simply stand by and wait for people to die and prosecute the users for manslaughter. Or is there another option?
  • Question 2: Declining Gift Solicitations: How can I refuse solicitations for gifts for co-workers? I work in a department of about thirty people. In the past few months, we have been asked to contribute money to buy gifts for co-workers – for engagements, baby showers, bereavement flowers, and Christmas gifts for the department chair, administrative assistants, housekeeping staff, and lab manager. Generally these requests are made by e-mail, and I can see from the "reply all" messages that everyone else contributes. Often these donations add up to a large amount ($10-20 each time). I do not wish to take part, but am worried that since I am a newer employee my lack of participation will be interpreted negatively. What can I do?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 25 January 2015. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.

Thursday evening, 29 January 2015: Q&A on Doctrine of Double Effect, Being Helpful, Sports Fans, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 29 January 2015.
  • Question 1: Doctrine of Double Effect: Is the doctrine of double effect true? The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy says: "The doctrine (or principle) of double effect is often invoked to explain the permissibility of an action that causes a serious harm, such as the death of a human being, as a side effect of promoting some good end. It is claimed that sometimes it is permissible to cause such a harm as a side effect (or 'double effect') of bringing about a good result even though it would not be permissible to cause such a harm as a means to bringing about the same good end." How has this principled used in analyzing real-world ethics? Is it true? Why or why not?
  • Question 2: Being Helpful to a Disliked Co-Worker: Should I do something nice for a coworker I dislike? There's a lady at work that I dislike. My conflict with her is primarily merely a conflict of personality. I find her defensive, passive-aggressive, and awkward to the point of rudeness. I am also not very impressed with her work products, but that rarely has a direct impact on me – except when I'm asked to review them – as is the fact that she only seems to work for about six hours every day. Indirectly, of course, her eccentricities and poor work quality cast our team in a very poor light and could eventually serve as a reason to dissolve or lay off our team. It's a mystery as to why she hasn't been fired. But I'm not her manager. In a meeting earlier today, she made a remark that she thought she was being excluded from important meetings that are relevant to her work. The truth is that she's not being actively excluded from these meetings, but rather everything is happening so fast and the meetings aren't always planned, so it's really just not possible to include her in those meetings. She would probably be heartened to understand better how these events take place in our company. (She's rather new, and I am very tenured.) She might feel better about her position and she might become less defensive about things if she had a better understanding of the organizational mechanics here. But I strongly dislike her and would prefer that she seek other employment. Should I be kind and explain those mechanics or not?
  • Question 3: Collectivism among Sports Fans: Are sports fans collectivists? A friend of mine thinks that sports fans are living vicariously through the players and are thus collectivistic. I think this is an overgeneralization from contact with super-fans of pro sports. Getting mad when "my" team loses and saying things like "we won" are some of the examples of the collectivist thinking he cites. Is there a logical link between fans and collectivism or are super-fans inherently collectivistic, even if it is compartmentalized? Is team competition or "us-versus-them mentality" a good indicator of someone that should be avoided as a friend or partner?
The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 29 January 2015. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

18 January 2015: Q&A on Right to Die, Marriage without Love, Creating Art, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Should a person who does not wish to live be forcibly prevented from committing suicide? Should people who merely like and respect each other ever marry? Is creating art necessary for a moral life?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, January 23, 2015

The Paleo Rodeo #245

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Vanessa presents How you feel after eating and what you crave: your body is talking to you posted at Fitbynature, saying, "A lot of us know what to eat, especially what we like to eat! But how do you know how much, or what you might need that particular day to make you feel amazing?"

Vanessa presents The speedy benefits of juices need slowing down for the most health posted at Fitbynature, saying, "We’re all pretty keen to get moving in the morning: ok, let’s face it rushing is the norm. And getting veggies into your breakfast to get even near your target needs, let along the variety that your bodies craves, is just not a thought you have. but health and convenience needn’t be opposites, and the smoothie and his juicy cousins are the epitome."

Sophie presents AIP / STEAMED BROCCOLI MASH posted at A Squirrel in the Kitchen, saying, "This steamed broccoli mash recipe is the best trick I know to make use of those broccoli stems that are usually left untouched on the side of the plate!"

Eileen Laird presents Episode 10: Overcoming Self-Sabotage posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "This episode of the Phoenix Helix podcast delves into the topic of self-sabotage. Sometimes, we do things that we know will cause an autoimmune flare. It's doubly painful, because not only do we suffer the physical symptoms, we're full of shame about being the cause. Today I'm joined by Dr. Judy Tsafrir and Rory Linehan, to talk about why we do this, and how to break this pattern."

Louise Hendon presents What's the Best Food For Your Dog? posted at Paleo Living Magazine, saying, "We recently got a puppy, and so I've been researching what best to feed him. This article is a summary of my research and conclusion."

Louise Hendon presents 20 Fantastic Paleo Kombucha Recipes posted at Paleo Living Magazine, saying, "I love drinking kombucha, but it can get expensive to buy them all the time. The best solution is to make your own, and here are 20 great recipes as well as step-by-step instructions on how to make them."

Melissa presents The beauty of white tea posted at Focus on Paleo, saying, "Drinking white tea can help keep you looking young."

Melissa presents Major score at the Korean market posted at Focus on Paleo, saying, "Noodles made from sweet potato starch. You NEED these!"

Melissa Joulwan presents Thai Pink Grapefruit Salad posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "This salad has bold flavors – fragrant mint, briny dried shrimp, fiery jalapeƱo, and sweet coconut – to wake up and shake up your meals and give you a punch of Vitamin C."

Amy Kubal presents The Journey To Health: Hey! This Map Is WRONG!?!? posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "The road to health isn't always a straight line - but even with a few detours you will get there. Enjoy the ride!"

Clare Gravolet presents How to Make You and Your Workout Click posted at Happy Eater, saying, "I used to wonder how some people have that magic ability to actually WANT to workout. In this post I talk a little bit about what is needed to make you and your workout routines 'click."."

Blair presents Hot off the Digital Presses posted at Menopause Happens, saying, "My new eBook Menopause Happens: Own the Change is now available! It is written for the woman who wants to retain or reclaim her vitality during the menopausal transition and it will especially resonate with the Paleo minded. As a registered nurse and long-time Paleo advocate, I share what has worked for me personally as well as what makes sense to me scientifically."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 18 January 2015: Q&A on Right to Die, Marriage without Love, Creating Art, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 18 January 2015.
  • Question 1: The Right to Die: Should a person who does not wish to live be forcibly prevented from committing suicide? John doesn't like living. He finds no joy in life, and only lives because it would upset other people if he ended his life. He has tried counseling and medication, but he simply has no desire to continue to live. He makes no real contribution to society, nor does he wish to be a part of society. If John wants to die, he can, but the state will attempt to stop him at every turn, even to the point of incarceration. Is there a point when the law (and other people) should simply respect his wishes and allow him to end his life – or perhaps even assist him in doing so?
  • Question 2: Marriage without Love: Should people who merely like and respect each other ever marry? Imagine that a person doesn't think that he'll ever find true and deep love – perhaps for good reason. In that case, is it wrong to marry someone you enjoy, value, like, and respect – even if you don't love that person? What factors might make a decision reasonable, if any? Should the other person know about the lack of depth in your feelings?
  • Question 3: Creating Art: Is creating art necessary for a moral life? Since material values are a human need, independence requires that human beings engage in productive activity. Can the same logic be applied to art? Since art is a human need, does independence require human beings to be artistically creative? Would someone who enjoys art without producing any be an "aesthetic moocher"?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 18 January 2015. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

11 January 2015: Q&A on Credibility, Third Party Payments, Racial Insults, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Should a person's credibility matter in judging his empirical claims? What should be done about third party payments in medicine? Is it wrong to use racist epithets to insult the truly evil?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

15 January 2015: Chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Six"

I discussed "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Six" with listeners on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

"Can an Aristotelian theory of moral responsibility solve the problem of moral luck? In particular, how does the theory of responsibility for actions handle the proposed cases of "circumstantial moral luck"? I will answer these questions and more in this discussion of Chapter Six of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame."

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, January 16, 2015

The Paleo Rodeo #244

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Kris Gunnars presents 26 Weight Loss Tips That Are Actually Evidence-Based posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Most weight loss methods are unproven and ineffective. Here is a list of 26 weight loss tips that are actually supported by real scientific studies."

Nell Stephenson presents Pocket Paleo, Breakfast, Snacks and Workout Available NOW! posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson announces her latest publication is available today! Pocket Paleo breakfast, snacks and workout have 50 recipes each and can be purchased for kindle or on iTunes."

Kevin Geary presents 11 Reasons You’re Struggling to Lose Body Fat (and What to Do Differently) posted at Rebooted Body: Fat Loss + Peak Performance + Vibrant Health, saying, "Here are 11 reasons why you may not be losing the fat that you want to and what to do about it!"

Kris Gunnars presents Vitamin D: Literally Everything You Need to Know posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "This is a detailed article about vitamin D and its health effects. Vitamin D actually functions as a hormone, and deficiency is incredibly common."

Sabine presents White vs Sweet Potato posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "You may have already heard the news, but if you haven't, here it is: the potato is finally out of paleo jail."

Sophie presents AIP / PALEO BREAKFAST HASH CASSEROLE WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH and CILANTRO posted at A Squirrel in the Kitchen, saying, "This is a quick and easy paleo breakfast hash casserole for those mornings when you don’t have much time to cook!"

Eileen Laird presents Can Skipping Sleep Cause an Autoimmune Flare? posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "How many of us try to squeeze extra time out of the day, by staying up late or getting up early? We sacrifice sleep, because in American culture, we don’t value it. We consider it unproductive time, but we’re wrong. When it comes to reversing autoimmune disease, sleep is as important to our health as diet, and it might be the key (or the obstacle) to remission. Research also shows that we can’t “catch up” on sleep over the weekend. It feels like we can, because we’re less tired after a couple of good nights’ sleep, but on a cellular level we haven’t recovered. In today's post, I share the research along with tips for how to get sleep well and long."

Sophie presents HOW TO CUT AND PEEL BUTTERNUT SQUASH? posted at A Squirrel in the Kitchen, saying, "Great tutorial on how to cut and peel butternut squash (in less than 10 minutes!). Tools needed: a cutting board, a kitchen serrated knife, vegetable peeler, and a spoon."

Eileen presents Episode 09: What Is Functional Medicine? posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "This episode of the Phoenix Helix podcast answers the question, 'What is Functional Medicine?" Our guest is Anne Angelone, acupuncturist, herbalist and functional medicine practitioner. She talks about what health obstacles can interfere with autoimmune healing, which tests are most helpful, and which interventions she recommends. Anne also has autoimmune disease herself (ankylosing spondylitis and uveitis), and shares her healing story with us today."

Vanessa presents Our modern deficiencies: nutrients and movement posted at Fitbynature, saying, "For a long time we’ve been near obsessed with calories and exercise. But we’ve tended to favor these in abundance at the expense of their foundations. Chances are, most of our health and fitness problems, and in that order, are because we’re nutrient not calorie deficient, and likewise movement not exercise deficient."

Vanessa presents Nutrient dense foods you can make yourself posted at Fitbynature, saying, "Nutrient dense' is an overused term that can make us think that we are eating a nutrient dense diet, when we aren’t. That dark chocolate you ate may be good for you, but that doesn’t mean you are eating a nutrient dense diet."

Meghan Little and Angel Ayala Torres presents Paleo Fried Green Tomatoes, A Southern, Late Night Snack posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "It's a new year and time for a new you...and we're here to help! Check out our helpful go-to guides like Getting Started Paleo, Paleo Alcohol Guide and more! Today's recipe? Paleo Fried Green Tomatoes...perfect for breakfast, lunch, or a late-night snack!"

Emily Haverkamp presents Paleo on the Road Week 2 posted at Habit Formation, saying, "This post includes some observations on trying to maintain my paleo eating during my second week of a three-week business trip."

Clare Gravolet presents Spicy Zucchini and Shrimp Soup posted at Happy Eater, saying, "This recipe is perfect for this nasty January weather. It's a simple and delicious recipe that has just the right amount of spice."

Laura P presents Kombucha's Cousin: How To Make Fermented Jun Tea posted at Rising Moon Nutrition, saying, "You may be familiar with kombucha tea as a healthful tonic beverage, but do you know about jun tea? Similar in health benefits to kombucha, jun is a fermented tea beverage made with green tea and honey, and is full of digestion-improving bacteria, enzymes and acids!"

Paul Jaminet presents Neu5gc, Red Meat, and Human Disease: Part I posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "Inspired by the recent 'red meat scare" linking red meat to cancer, I look into the potential of non-human sugars such as Neu5gc to cause human disease, especially autoimmune disease."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, January 10, 2015

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 11 January 2015: Q&A on Credibility, Third Party Payments, Racial Insults, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 11 January 2015.
  • Question 1: The Importance of Credibility: Should a person's credibility matter in judging his empirical claims? Is it rational to use a person's track record – meaning the frequency or consistency of truth in his past statements – in judging the likely truth of his current statements? In "Ayn Rand's Normative Ethics," Tara Smith explains that to believe something just because someone said it is a violation of the virtue of independence. Also, to judge an argument by the speaker is known as the fallacy of "ad hominem." However, doesn't the character of the speaker matter when considering whether to believe his claims? For example, when Thomas Sowell makes an empirical claim, my knowledge that he vigorously tests his hypotheses against the facts makes me more likely to judge his claim as true, even before I've confirmed his statement. Likewise, if a person is frequently wrong in his factual claims, I'd be sure to require lots of evidence before believing him. Is that rational? Or should all factual claims be treated equally regardless of who makes them?
  • Question 2: Third Party Payments in Medicine: What should be done about third party payments in medicine? I was fascinated by your statement in your November 7th, 2012 discussion of the election that the real need in medicine was to do away with third party payments. It's quite a radical proposal, one of the most radical I've heard from you. How would you think such a think might be implemented through ethically proper means – as opposed to measures such as legally prohibiting third party payments? Are there types of medical care – perhaps catastrophe illness or injury – where third party payment would need to be kept in place, or where people in a free economy would likely still choose to keep them in place?
  • Question 3: Insulting with Racial Epithets: Is it wrong to use racist epithets to insult the truly evil? A now-former Facebook friend used a racist epithet in reference to Islamic terrorists. I asked him if he understood that it was a racist term and he said he did and said that he used it on purpose to insult those evil-doers because they are so evilly evil that they deserve not even a little respect. I told him he was wrong because race is not the same as ideology and that I can't find any justification for racism, so I un-friended him. I agree that Islamic terrorists are evil, but is it morally okay to be a racist toward evil people?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 11 January 2015. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.

Thursday evening, 15 January 2015: Chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Six"

I'll chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Six" with listeners on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 15 January 2015.

Can an Aristotelian theory of moral responsibility solve the problem of moral luck? In particular, how does the theory of responsibility for actions handle the proposed cases of "circumstantial moral luck"? I will answer these questions and more in this discussion of Chapter Six of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame.

The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 15 January 2015. The podcast will be posted later that evening. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts

The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

4 January 2015: Q&A on Superstitious Rituals, Punishing Yourself, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Is it wrong to participate in superstitious rituals without taking them seriously? Should a person punish herself for wrongdoing by depriving herself of a value?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts

Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed. If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Saturday, January 03, 2015

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 4 January 2015: Q&A on Ultra-Hazardous Activities, Superstitious Rituals, Punishing Yourself, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 4 January 2015.
  • Question 1: Regulation of Ultra-Hazardous Activities: Would an ideal government issue bans/regulations to prevent harmful activity? At the turn of the 20th century it was common to use cyanide gas to fumigate buildings. Although it was well-known that cyanide gas was extremely poisonous and alternatives were available, its use continued and resulted in a number of accidental deaths due to the gas traveling through cracks in walls and even in plumbing. With the development of better toxicology practices, these deaths were more frequently recognized for what they were and at the end of summer in 1825 the NYC government banned its use. In a similar situation, tetraethyl lead (TEL) was banned after several men in a factory were killed while a couple dozen others when insane from the gas. The factory was adding the chemical to gasoline to render uncombusted gasoline in engines inert. Safety practices in factories being what they were at the time people really didn't know how to safely handle TEL. Moreover, the chief medical examiner of NYC at the time believed that having it as a gasoline additive presented a risk to the public if they came into contact with either gasoline with the additive or the byproducts of using it in the engines of their vehicles. In these and other situations, it was recognized that the substance in question was extremely poisonous and could only be handled with the most extreme care – care that was rarely demonstrated in the public. The question is this: should the government step in and ban the substance from general use or should it simply stand by and wait for people to die and prosecute the users for manslaughter or is there another option?
  • Question 2: Participating in Superstitious Rituals: Is it wrong to participate in superstitious rituals without taking them seriously? If I make some perfunctory observance or participation in some superstitious ritual, and do not believe the superstitious ritual is of any literal importance, am I still promoting irrationality? If I regularly read the horoscope in the newspaper, but do not believe astrology has any real impact on my life, does reading the horoscope promote irrationality? Likewise, in Hawaii, almost all retail establishments possess what are called "good-luck cats." A good-luck cat is a relatively inexpensive Asian figurine depicting a cat with one paw raised. Having this figurine is supposed to bring good luck to your business. You can commonly see such good-luck cat figurines in doctor's offices in Honolulu, and for your retail establishment not to have such a figurine would easily strike people as strange. If I spent just a little money on such a good-luck cat to decorate my business, and I didn't literally believe the figurine itself affected my fortunes, would the purchase be a concession to irrational thinking? Would such a gesture be "social proof" that would help other people rationalize more obviously pathological forms of irrationality, such as wasting hundreds of dollars on fortune tellers and psychic hotlines?
  • Question 3: Punishing Yourself: Should a person punish herself for wrongdoing by depriving herself of a value? A friend of mine destroyed her phone in a fit of anger over a difficult situation that wasn't her fault. Now my friend feels guilty about her outburst. She thinks that she doesn't deserve to properly replace her phone, as that would reward her irrational outburst. She wants to either buy a cheap phone or go without a phone for a while. That seems needlessly self-destructive. How can I explain to her that she really ought to replace her phone?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 4 January 2015. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

28 December 2014: Q&A on Extremism, Overcoming Lethargy, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

What's the difference between consistency and extremism? How can I motivate myself to act to further my goals despite my overwhelming lethargy?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, January 02, 2015

The Paleo Rodeo #243

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Ute presents Should you eat grains or avoid them? posted at Real Food 4 Me, saying, "My take on gluten, WGA, opioid peptides, and why I, personally avoid grains, but how you may choose not to do the same."

Melissa Joulwan presents The Best Version of Ourselves, 2015 posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "A call for all of us to just live our lives and be the best versions of ourselves that we can be – without judgment or shame or recrimination."

Sophie presents AIP / Paleo Bacon-Wrapped Pears posted at A Squirrel in the kitchen, saying, "With only 2 ingredients, these paleo bacon-wrapped pears are super easy to make and so delicious! Kids love them and you can prepare them ahead of time."

Eileen Laird presents 50 Paleo AIP and GAPS Slow Cooker Recipes posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "Who loves their slow cooker? There’s nothing quite so satisfying as throwing a few things in a pot, leaving the house, and coming home from work to delicious aromas and dinner ready! I put together this roundup to make the AIP a little bit easier."

Louise Hendon presents Top 10 Paleo Snacks For Air Travel posted at Paleo Living Magazine, saying, "I have to fly a lot, so packing well for traveling is a must. Here are my top 10 Paleo snacks for air travel."

Louise Hendon presents No Time To Cook Paleo? – My 3-Step System to Never Being Hungry No Matter How Busy You Are! posted at Paleo Living Magazine, saying, "I'm always running out of time to cook in the evenings, so I devised this simple 3-step system to always ensuring I had plenty of Paleo food around!"

Sophie presents 85 Amazing AIP Breakfasts posted at A Squirrel in the kitchen, saying, "85 Amazing AIP Breakfasts is a must have cookbook that will help you start the paleo autoimmune protocol diet today and reclaim your health."

Eileen Laird presents 85 Amazing AIP Breakfasts Cookbook Review, Sample Recipe and Giveaway! posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "The most common question I get asked about the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol is 'What can I eat for breakfast?" Now, I have 85 delicious answers for you! It's a community cookbook created by 26 AIP bloggers, and edited by me. Covering everything from herbal "coffee" to soups, smoothies, stir fries, "cereals", sausage, and even an AIP version of a pop-tart, this is the cookbook you've been waiting for. Today's blog post shares highlights from the book, a sample recipe for Pumpkin Spiced Pancakes, and a chance to win a free copy. Happy New Year, everyone!"

Vanessa presents Why Christmas (and New Year) leftovers can be better than the real deal posted at Fitbynature, saying, "I love leftovers: they're a chance to cook ahead but they’re also a chance to get creative to make something new from what you just had, with what you just had."

Laura P presents Increasing Stomach Acid For Better Health posted at Rising Moon Nutrition, saying, "This post from back in March was the most popular post on my blog in 2014. Low stomach acid is a very common digestive problem, and most people don't know that heartburn is actually caused by not enough stomach acid. Here are some easy, real food ways to increase your stomach acid naturally, improving your digestion and overall health."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

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Saturday, December 27, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 28 December 2014: Q&A on Extremism, Overcoming Lethargy, Punishing Yourself, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 28 December 2014.
  • Question 1: Extremism Versus Consistency: What's the difference between consistency and extremism? I'm often called an "extremist" for my views – in my view, because I'm very consistent and refuse to compromise. Religious people are often called extremists too, yet that's really only consistency with their scripture. So how does "extremism" differ from consistency, if at all?
  • Question 2: Overcoming Lethargy: How can I motivate myself to act to further my goals despite my overwhelming lethargy? I struggle with motivating myself to do what I know I should. I'm not inclined to do wrong, but I just find it hard to act to further my goals in life. I'm 26 and I live with my dad while I (slowly) finish my degree. I want to become financially independent and move out on my own, but I struggle with the normal, necessary daily habits required to get this done. For example, my dad wants me to do more house chores, and I can see how this is a fair thing to ask, given that he works two jobs to support both of us. However, when I think about all the things I should be doing a wave of lethargy overcomes me. It's the same story when I think about the homework I need to do, which isn't even very hard to do. Job searching and trying to build my resume are also on my mind, but I can't seem to get motivated to do that either. I have implemented GTD, but obviously once it comes to actually carrying out all of the plans, I can get a good burst of motivation for a short while, but then something doesn't go my way, and the lethargy hits me again. Both of my parents have clinical depression and anxiety problems, and I have seen first hand how it has affected their lives. I have spent most of my life combating depression and anxiety. I can always summon up a good mood for myself – sometimes by evading the pressure of my responsibilities, which is not good – and when I feel anxiety I am able to calm myself down by introspecting and thinking through it. So I know that I have the tools to solve problems in my life and achieve my goals, but self awareness has only gotten me so far. What can I do to raise my motivation and keep it up? How do I overcome the tendency to procrastinate and ignore my responsibilities? How do I put my philosophy into action?
  • Question 3: Punishing Yourself: Should a person punish herself for wrongdoing by depriving herself of a value? A friend of mine destroyed her phone in a fit of anger over a difficult situation that wasn't her fault. Now my friend feels guilty about her outburst. She thinks that she doesn't deserve to properly replace her phone, as that would reward her irrational outburst. She wants to either buy a cheap phone or go without a phone for a while. That seems needlessly self-destructive. How can I explain to her that she really ought to replace her phone?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 28 December 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

21 December 2014: Q&A on The Boundaries of Philosophy and Science, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

What is the proper relationship between philosophy and science?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

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