Saturday, July 26, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 27 July 2014: Q&A on Defamation Laws, Pursuing Justice, Conning Jerks, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 27 July 2014.
  • Question 1: The Justice of Defamation Laws: Do libel and slander laws violate or protect rights? Every few weeks, the media reports on some notable (or absurd) defamation case – meaning a claim of "false or unjustified injury of the good reputation of another, as by slander or libel." While a person's reputation as a business or person is certainly important, do people really have a "right" to their reputation? Isn't reputation the reaction of others to your own actions and character? How can a person create or own their reputation? Do defamation laws violate the right to free speech by protecting a non-right?
  • Question 2: Pursuing Justice at Great Personal Cost: Should I pursue justice against a wrongdoer at great personal expense? I am trying to decide if I should file an ethics complaint against my former property manager for a rental property. Basically, she managed the property for me for several years until I visited the property and found it in a state of disrepair that annoyed and concerned me. So, I wanted to fire her. But before she would release me from our agreement, she charged me $1,200 for repairs and maintenance that she had done to the house between tenants. She never asked me if I wanted the work done and when pressed she told me it was a matter of routine and our contract granted her the power to make decisions like that. Upon inspection, I discovered that not only were some of the prices she paid were above market rate, it was her husband's company doing the work. (I found out the rates because in getting the repairs done, I got quotes from other companies in the area.) I've reviewed some of the past records and she did this about 50% of the time. The Association of Realtors' code of ethics in my state specifically notes that she has to disclose relationships like that, but she didn't. So, I think whether she was in violation is pretty clear cut; however, some have argued that our contract supersedes the code of ethics. (If the board agrees with that argument, then this becomes a contract dispute and not an ethics concern.) If I file the complaint and the board decides to hear the case, I will have to hire a lawyer, make trips to the area, and basically shovel out even more money. The board could take her license or fine her, but in talking to a lawyer, and a couple of officers on the board it's more likely that they will push for some sort of education rather than taking her license. And none of that would do anything to get my money back. To get my money back, I'd probably have to go through an even more costly process of mediation, then arbitration, then suing her in small claims court where I would never recoup all of my costs. I think it's pretty obvious she's in the wrong and I think I can make the case strong enough to bring some measure of justice on her, but it would be expensive and stressful. On the other hand, she was very unpleasant to me and I hate to see her get away with being a horrible person and a corrupt professional. What should I do? How do I decide whether pursuing justice is worth my time and effort?
  • Question 3: The Cultural Effects of Superhero Movies: Do good ideas in superhero movies and television change people's philosophy? I have really enjoyed the pro-freedom and pro-personal responsibility messages of some recent superhero movies. However, I wonder whether those messages do any good. Rationally, I believe that a person can enjoy these superhero characters and then relate their qualities to a normal human standard. However, for the average viewer, I wonder whether the gulf between their superpowers and ordinary human powers creates a moral gulf too, so that people see the moral ideals of the superheroes as beyond the reach of us mere mortals. Is that right? Can these movies really affect people's ideas?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 27 July 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.

Thursday evening, 31 July 2014: Dr. Doug McGuff on "Government Controls in Emergency Medicine"

I'll interview emergency medicine physician Dr. Doug McGuff about "Government Controls in Emergency Medicine" on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 31 July 2014.

The practice of emergency medicine is heavily regulated by the government. What are some of those regulations? What are their effects? How do they make the practice of medicine more difficult? How would emergency medicine function in a truly free market?

Dr. Doug McGuff is an emergency medicine doctor practicing in South Carolina. He graduated from the University of Texas Medical School at San Antonio in 1989, and then trained in Emergency Medicine at the University of Arkansas, where he served as Chief Resident. From there, Dr. McGuff served as Faculty in the Wright State University Emergency Medicine Residency and was a staff Emergency Physician at Wright-Patterson AFB Hospital. Today, Dr. McGuff is a partner with Blue Ridge Emergency Physicians. I interviewed Dr. Doug McGuff about fitness, weightlifting, and high-intensity exercise in December 2012 and about avoiding the emergency room in May 2013.

The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 31 July 2014. The podcast will be posted later that evening. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

20 July 2014: Q&A on Conservative Allies, Grading Fairly, Unearned Guilt, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Aren't politicians like Ted Cruz and Rand Paul allies in the struggle for liberty? Should a professor pass a student who deserved to flunk for fear of reprisals? How can I overcome feelings of unearned guilt about refusing other people's requests?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, July 25, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #223

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Kris Gunnars presents 11 Proven Health Benefits of Quinoa (No. 1 is My Favorite) posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Quinoa is among the healthiest and most nutritious foods on the planet. Here are 11 proven health benefits of quinoa, supported by science."

Meghanne Reburn RM presents Why Ice Cream is your friend when you are paleo or primal and pregnant posted at CaveGirl Plus One, saying, "Meg, the 'Paleo Midwife", share's her views on why ice cream is the perfect summer indulgence when you're paleo and pregnant (or not!). She also reviews Kelly Brozynas new book "Dairy Free Ice Cream" and shares an inspired paleo 'Cherry Garcia' recipe."

Amy Kubal presents Watch Your Mouth! posted at Robb Wolf, saying, "Sometimes the words we use to talk to ourselves are less than 'friendly'. Would you be friends with yourself?"

Eileen Laird presents Grilled Salmon Packets with Strawberry Ginger Salsa posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "This recipe uses a genius grilling technique that cooks the salmon perfectly every time, with a tasty salsa that's completely AIP-friendly. Add to that the anti-inflammatory properties of every ingredient, and it's healing food at its finest."

Melissa presents Cooking with cardamom posted at Focus Paleo, saying, "A few recipes that I hope keep the tedium out of trying to come up with new ways to cook meat."

Kevin Geary presents How to Strategically Use Coffee to Create A Workout Habit posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Learn to identify cues that trigger undesirable behavior and learn how to correct those cues to create better behaviors!"

Adam presents Taking My 40s By The Balls posted at Practical Paleolithic, saying, "An inspirational post about an impending birthday, aging and what's possible for us as we move into our 40s, 50s, 60s and beyond..."

Melissa Joulwan presents Classic (Paleo) Diner-Style Home Fries posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "Crisp on the outside, tender on the inside, these home fries are great at any meal!"

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #149 posted at Diane Sanfilippo, saying, "Podcast Episode #149: Paleo baking, sourdough bread, eating clean but still have a distended belly, and temporary vegetarianism."

Meghan Little and Angel Ayala Torres presents Paleo Cabbage and Kale Coleslaw, A Picnic Side posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This recipe is easy to make, stays great in the fridge if you need to make it in advance, and is perfect for any summer bbq, picnic, beach party or cookout! It has a hint of sweet and a little tangy, which is great with grilled food or our Paleo Honey Fried Chicken!"

Nell Stephenson presents Livestrong, You’ve Got It Right! posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo Expert Nell Stephenson writes about an excellent article in Livestrong that did a very good job providing accurate information on some Paleo Friendly recipes."

Annie presents What's Your Excuse? posted at Sardines on the Subway, saying, "I discuss the silly idea that people need to have a 'reason" to experiment with their diets and improve their health."

Ray Sylvester presents Clean Eating, or, What's in a Couple Words? posted at EditIntuitive, saying, "Clean eating! What is it good for?"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 20 July 2014: Q&A on Conservatives, Grading Fairly, Unearned Guilt, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 20 July 2014.
  • Question 1: Conservative Allies in the Struggle for Liberty: Aren't politicians like Ted Cruz and Rand Paul allies in the struggle for liberty? Although I'm an atheist and a novice Objectivist, I've always wondered why so many advocates of individual rights oppose candidates and movements that seem to agree with us on a great many issues. Despite their other warts, Rand Paul and Ted Cruz are the most likely men to promote our causes. The notion that they evangelize is dubious. And even if true, are there better alternatives today? I've also seen this attitude towards Libertarian candidates and their party. Ronald Reagan was the only President who advanced the ball towards free markets in the last fifty years, and yet people condemn him because of his position on abortion and because of his religious/political partnerships. I've never understood this. Shouldn't we embrace the advocates of free markets out there today, even if not perfect?
  • Question 2: Flunking a Student: Should a professor pass a student who deserved to flunk for fear of reprisals? Because you've taught at the university level, I want to ask you about integrity in grading as a professor. Suppose you flunked a student who never showed up to class and didn't complete the assigned work adequately. However, this student was well-connected to university donors and administrators. After you flunked this student, suppose that a high-ranking administrator threatened reprisals against you if you didn't give this student a passing grade. What should you do? Would it be corrupt to comply with the administrator's demand? What might you (or another professor) do instead?
  • Question 3: Guilt about Refusing Requests: How can I overcome feelings of unearned guilt about refusing other people's requests? Too often, I feel guilty when I shouldn't – for example, for rejecting unwanted romantic advances or declining invitations to events with family or coworkers. Even though I know logically that I have the right to pursue my own values rather than satisfy the wishes of others, I feel terrible knowing that my actions will disappoint or upset someone else. Too often I succumb to the guilt: I agree to things I'd rather not because I don't want to let someone else down. What philosophical or psychological strategies might I use for dealing with such unearned guilt?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 20 July 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

15 July 2014: Podcast on "Moral Amplifiers"

I podcast on "Moral Amplifiers" on Tuesday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

"Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism upholds seven major virtues as indispensable to our lives. Yet what of other qualities of character – such as ambition, courage, spontaneity, liveliness, discretion, patience, empathy, and friendliness? Are these virtues, personality traits, or something else? In this 2013 talk at ATLOSCon, I argued that such qualities are best understood as "moral amplifiers," because their moral worth wholly depends how they're used. I explained why people should cultivate such qualities and why they must be put into practice selectively."

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more.

17 July 2014: Chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Four"

I discussed "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Four" with listeners on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

"The purpose of a theory of moral responsibility is to limit moral judgments of persons to their voluntary doings, products, and qualities. However, moral judgments are not the only – or even the most common – judgments of people we commonly make. So what are the various kinds of judgments we make of other people? What are the distinctive purposes and demands of those judgments? What is the relationship between those judgments and a person's voluntary actions, outcomes, and traits? I answered these questions and more in this discussion of Chapter Four of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame."

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, July 18, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #222

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Ruth presents Perfect Primal Pizza posted at Paleo Diet Basics, saying, "OMG, this pizza is simply delicious. It's totally gluten-free but it does have cheese and rice flour, so if you don't include those in your diet, this isn't for you. But if you do, wow, this is a delicious pizza with a killer crust!"

Kris Gunnars presents 15 Things That Everyone Needs to Know About Nutrition posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Nutrition is riddled with misinformation and it can be hard to figure out the truth. Here are 15 things that everyone needs to know about nutrition."

Kevin Geary presents How to Get Unstuck and Win Big posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Find inspiration and motivation to move forward with your goals and win big!"

Eileen Laird presents 50 Fantastic AIP Recipes for Summertime! posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "When you start the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) , it can be such a dramatic change to the way you’re used to eating, that it’s easy to fear your favorite foods are gone for good, and you have no idea what to eat at all. I’m here to help! I’ve gathered together 50 AIP-friendly recipes to satisfy your summer cravings, everything from grilled favorites, to salads, to frozen treats."

Salixisme presents Grilled Shrimp with Mango, Strawberry, Avocado Salsa posted at Salixisme - Paleo Living, saying, "These grilled shrimp were just delicious. I marinated them for a short time in a mixture of lime juice, honey and garlic which gave them a wonderful flavour, and the honey contributed to the caremelization on the surface. They were served these on top of a mango and strawberry salsa."

Salixisme presents Tostones - Green Plantain Fritters posted at Salixisme - Paleo Living, saying, "Tostones are twice-fried green plantains, and they can provide both a tasty starchy side and an appetizing crunch to many dishes. They resemble a crispy, crunchy chip or fritter."

Paul Jaminet presents A Look at the May Perfect Health Retreat posted at Perfect Health Diet, saying, "We held a very successful ancestral health retreat on a North Carolina beach in May, and will hold another in October. Here I show photos from the May Retreat."

Sabine presents Lebanese Chicken posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "This Lebanese inspired recipe is easy to make before-hand, pop in the oven on the day and you're good to go!"

Meghan Little and Angel Ayala Torres presents Paleo Blueberry GraNOla Bars, A Protein Snack Bar posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "It's National Blueberry Month! What better way to celebrate than make a TON of recipes featuring our favorite little blue-berry…The Blueberry! Try our delicious and easy to make Paleo Blueberry GraNOla Bars for a sweet, on the go treat!"

Sabine presents Steak and Anchovies posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "Add some bold flavor to your steaks with this fishy rub!"

Nell Stephenson presents Meat Quality and Paleo posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson explains why hot dogs, bacon and the like are generally not good Paleo friendly options."

Steve Kirsch presents The day white potatoes made my head explode (or: "Usually I'm nicer than this") posted at The Paleo Drummer, saying, "The Whole30 folks decided white potatoes are OK. I'm fine with that; it's the reaction that blowing my mind."

Steve Kirsch presents Shock the monkey posted at The Paleo Drummer, saying, "This week's sad news: two-thirds of men would rather administer electric shocks to themselves than be alone with their thoughts. Shoot me now."

Melissa presents Hunting for your paleo diet ingredients posted at Focus Paleo , saying, "Learning how to hunt, and becoming an active hunter, may be the best way to make sure your meat is purely grass fed."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Thursday evening, 17 July 2014: Chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Four"

I'll chat about "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Four" with listeners on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 17 July 2014.

The purpose of a theory of moral responsibility is to limit moral judgments of persons to their voluntary doings, products, and qualities. However, moral judgments are not the only – or even the most common – judgments of people we commonly make. So what are the various kinds of judgments we make of other people? What are the distinctive purposes and demands of those judgments? What is the relationship between those judgments and a person's voluntary actions, outcomes, and traits? I will answer these questions and more in this discussion of Chapter Four of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame.

The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 17 July 2014. The podcast will be posted later that evening. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

6 July 2014: Q&A on Psychological Egoism, Atlas Shrugged, Generosity, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Isn't everyone selfish? Was 'Atlas Shrugged' written to save America? How much generosity is too much?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

10 July 2014: Q&A on Limited Government, Enjoying the Moment, and More

I answered these questions on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Should the government of a free society be permitted to do more than just protect rights? How can I convince myself that the grass isn't always greener on the other side of the fence?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, July 11, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #221

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Annika McCann presents How to make yogurt in a crock-pot posted at Pretty Good Paleo, saying, "How to make long-fermented yogurt in a crock-pot - safe for a low-FODMAP, SCD, or GAPS diet."

Meghanne Reburn presents How to Balance Your Hormones- Paleo Styles posted at CaveGirl Plus One, saying, "Meg the 'Paleo Midwife' gives a few helpful tips to help optimize your hormone balance, enhance your fertility and increase your overall wellness. Somehow she managed to fit chips into a post about hormones...curious how she did it? ..check out this latest post!"

Meghan Little and Angel Ayala Torres presents Paleo Strawberry Jam, A Fresh Fruit Spread for Toast posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This recipe for Paleo Strawberry Jam will make your morning right! …or try it in our AB+J (Almond Butter + Jam) Sandwiches! Delicious!"

Eileen Laird presents Melted Zucchini and Onions posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "You know how overcooking veggies makes them bland and tasteless? There's an exception to every rule. Sometimes, cooking them low and slow concentrates their flavor in a way that simply transforms them. That's how I feel about this recipe. It's easy to prepare, and luscious in flavor (the best kind of recipe.)."

Kevin Geary presents 10 Insightful Lessons I Learned in The First Year Leading Total Body Reboot posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "The top ten insights from year one of Rebooted Body. Read on to find out what makes our program effective and unique!"

Ray Sylvester presents Is Paleo Here to Stay? posted at EditIntuitive, saying, "As a trend, Paleo has hit the mainstream hard. But where does it go from here?"

Nell Stephenson presents Obessing About Food? posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson writes about one very common reason why one might be obsessing about food when trying to be Paleo: not eating enough!"

Sabine presents Butternut Squash Muffins posted at CaveFood Kitchen, saying, "Delicious low sugar muffins that are great for breakfast!"

Sabine presents Pumpkin Spice Granola posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "Add some crunch to your breakfast!"

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #147: Losing friends on Paleo, help with waxy hair, stuck in a meal prep rut posted at Diane Sanfilippo, saying, "This weeks podcast tackles questions about hair care, losing friends and meal prep."

Steve Kirsch presents "How can I lose body fat?" posted at The Paleo Drummer, saying, "It's the most common question I get asked at the gym: 'How can I lose body fat?" Here are some easy tips, and none of them are "Burn it off with endurance cardio."."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, July 05, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 6 July 2014: Q&A on Psychological Egoism, Atlas Shrugged, Generosity, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 6 July 2014.
  • Question 1: Psychological Egoism: Isn't everyone selfish? If you dig deep enough, everyone seems to act in their own interests. I work because that's easier than being a welfare queen. But a college student might cave to his parents about his choice of career because that's easier than standing up for himself. Even the nun who seems to sacrifice everything is doing what she enjoys most and thinks best by her own religious standards. So isn't true altruism impossible? Isn't everyone selfish?
  • Question 2: The Purpose of Atlas Shrugged: Was Atlas Shrugged written to save America? Recently, I ran across this comment on the internet: ""Saving America wasn't the point of Atlas Shrugged, that's not the happily ever after it proposes in the end. It chronicles the main characters getting over that misguided mission and why." Two questions come to mind: (1) What was Ayn Rand's purpose in writing Atlas Shrugged? And (2) Do you think that being inspired to "save America" after reading Atlas Shrugged is misguided?
  • Question 3: Limiting Another's Generosity: How much generosity is too much? Generosity seems like a trait that would fit well into your theory of moral amplifiers. But how does one best deal with someone who is being overly generous? I recently relocated to a new city and one of my coworkers with whom I am friendly has really gone above and beyond trying to help me get settled. She is constantly offering to help, lend me things, or even give me things to make life easier. I appreciate her offers and turn down many of them as politely as I can. But I struggle to find the right balance of accepting her generosity in due proportion to our friendship. She seems to be fairly wealthy, so I don't think her offers are sacrificial in any way, my issue is that we are friends, but not close enough friends to justify the incessant barrage of motherly offerings. Through consistent communication about what I am willing to accept and what I won't – and also owing to actually getting settled in the new city – she's backed off a bit. More broadly, how would you recommend dealing with this sort of problem? How can a person make sure not to make this mistake of being overly generous?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 6 July 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.

Thursday evening, 10 July 2014: Q&A on The Proper Role of Government, Enjoying the Moment, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 10 July 2014.
  • Question 1: The Proper Role of Government: Should the government of a free society be permitted to do more than just protect rights? If the proper purpose of government is to protect individual rights, why shouldn't a government of a free society do other, additional things as long as it does them without violating anyone's rights? If courts, police, and military could be publicly financed without the use of force, couldn't roads and schools? Is there some reason besides reliance on taxation why these sorts of government programs are bad?
  • Question 2: Enjoying the Moment: How can I convince myself that the grass isn't always greener on the other side? I always think that the grass must be greener on the other side of the fence. Whatever subject I study, I think about all the other subjects I'm not studying. Whatever work I'm doing, I think about all the other work I'm not getting done. Whatever book I'm reading, I think about all the other books I could be reading. I want to do everything, and I want to do all of it right now. How can I convince myself to be happy with what I'm actually doing and able to do? How can I stop this perpetual cycle of boredom and longing for change?
The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 10 July 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

3 July 2014: Dr. Paul Hsieh on "Understanding the Three Languages of Politics"

I interviewed physician and activist Dr. Paul Hsieh about "Understanding the Three Languages of Politics" on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

"How many times have you been in political discussions with friends where you find you're talking past one another? You'll make points they consider irrelevant, whereas they'll focus on issues you consider nonessential. Such problems can be overcome, at least in part, using Arnold Kling's concept of the "Three Languages of Politics." Paul Hsieh explained how freedom advocates (e.g., Objectivists and better libertarians), conservatives, and liberals tend to use three vastly different metaphors in political discussions, which can create unintentional misunderstandings and miscommunications. He discussed how to frame discussion points so they better resonate with those speaking the other "languages" without compromising on principles. " Dr. Paul Hsieh is a physician in practice in South Denver. He is the co-founder of Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine (FIRM). He has written scores of columns, mostly on health care policy, as well as articles for The Objective Standard. He blogs offbeat tech news at GeekPress.

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more.

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Friday, July 04, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #220

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Kris Gunnars presents 7 Things That Vegans and Paleo Dieters Agree on posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Even diets that seem to be polar opposites of one another can have many things in common. Here are 7 things that the vegans and paleo folks agree on."

Penny presents My Interview With A Hunter-Gatherer posted at Health Coach Penny, saying, "I recently made a 12 day trip to Africa and was lucky enough to have dinner with a born and raised San Bushman of the Okavanga Delta. After relentlessly quizzing him at dinner I then asked him for a video interview. Here it is."

Melissa Joulwan presents Spiced-Nut Vanilla Coconut Ice Cream posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "Not too sweet and super creamy, this coconut milk ice cream is easy to make and it's lovely on a hot summer day. Or any day, really."

Melissa Joulwan presents Great Ingredients: No Recipe Required posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "Eating Paleo doesn't need to be complicated – and you can make delicious meals without even following a recipe. This post outlines tons of yummy ideas, no recipe required."

Kevin Geary presents Introducing Reboot Your Kids posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Introducing the all new website, Reboot Your Kids! This is site has been created to help parents transition their kids and families to a healthier way of living, eating and relating. Check it out!!"

Eileen Laird presents The Difference Between Reversing Autoimmune Disease and a Cure posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "My 2 year healing diet anniversary happened this month, and brought with it feelings I didn't expect. It got me thinking about the language of healing, and the difference between reversal and cure. What do these words mean? What's really possible? Today, I take an honest and thorough look at healing autoimmunity."

Sabine presents Eggplant Hamburgers posted at CaveFood Kitchen, saying, "Simple and paleo way to eat your burgers!"

Nell Stephenson presents Traveling Paleo Is Not That Tricky posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson writes about how easy it has been to keep Paleo while traveling in Italy."

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #146: Liver, bone broth, hydration, and feeding paleo pets posted at Diane Sanfilippo, saying, "This weeks podcast learn about hydration without gatorade, what to feed paleo pets, bone broth, liver and more!"

Salixisme presents 30 AIP (Auto-Immune Prototocol) Paleo Breakfast Ideas posted at Salixisme - Paleo Living, saying, "30 ideas for breakfasts that fit with the AIP Paleo guidelines. All suggestions are egg, gluten, dairy, nightshade, nut and seed free."

Salixisme presents How To Make Kombucha And Grow Your Own SCOBY posted at Salixisme - Paleo Living, saying, "How to grow your own SCOBY from a bottle of raw kombucha, and then how to use it to brew kombucha from sweetened tea."

Salixisme presents AIP Saskatoon Berry And Peach BBQ Sauce posted at Salixisme - Paleo Living, saying, "Finding a true AIP compliant BBQ sauce is really hard - most contain tomatoes, chilli and other non-AIP ingredients. This sauce is 100% AIP compliant and uses Saskatoon berries and peaches as the main ingredients."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

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