Saturday, September 20, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 21 September 2014: Q&A on Blaming Crime Victims, Concealed Carry Permits, Hijacking Ideas, More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 21 September 2014.
  • Question 1: Blaming Crime Victims: Is it wrong to suggest that a crime victim should have taken greater precautions? My wife and I were discussing the recent iCloud data breach in which a hacker stole and published nude photos of hundreds of female celebrities. I made the comment that while the hacker’s actions were despicable, at the same time I thought the celebrities were stupid to have trusted iCloud to protect the privacy of their photos in the first place. My wife balked at this, saying that this amounts to blaming the victim, and is no better than saying a woman who is raped was stupid for wearing a short skirt, or for drinking alcohol. But I see it as being more akin to saying a person whose bag was stolen from their car was stupid for leaving the door unlocked. Do comments of this sort really amount to ‘blaming the victim’? Is it proper or improper to make such comments? Does my level of expertise or the victim's level of expertise make any difference? (As a computer engineer, I am very aware of the dangers of the cloud, whereas your average celebrity would probably be clueless about it.) Intuitively, I feel like the comments would be improper in my wife’s example, proper in my example, and I’m unsure about the data breach itself. But I’m struggling to identify what the defining characteristics are for each case. What's the right approach here?
  • Question 2: The Validity of Concealed Carry Permits: Should concealed carry permits be required to carry firearms concealed? In the United States today, most states have "shall-issue" concealed carry laws, whereby the sheriff of a county must issue a concealed carry permit to anyone who meets the requirements. Those requirements usually include no history of criminal activity, no history of mental illness, and some training. However, two states permit "constitutional carry," meaning that any law-abiding citizen has a right to carry a concealed firearm, without the need for a permit. Is requiring a "concealed carry" permit a violation of the right to self-defense? Or is "constitutional carry" a dangerous form of anarchy?
  • Question 3: Hijacking Ayn Rand's Ideas: What can be done to prevent the hijacking of Ayn Rand's ideas? Ayn Rand has become more and more popular over the last decade, and her ideas have begun to spread into academia. There is more literature being written about Objectivism now then ever before. But there is one thing that worries me. There is a great risk that as Ayn Rand becomes "trendy," second handers will try to use her ideas, manipulate them, to gain respect, and to further their nefarious ends. This is exactly what happened to Friedrich Nietzsche – when his ideas became popular, his philosophy was hijacked by anarchists, nazis, and postmodernists, completely destroying his reputation for a century. How do we prevent this from happening to Ayn Rand?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 21 September 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

11 September 2014: Q&A on Rescuing Pets, Large Egos, and More

I answered these questions on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Should a person be prosecuted for property damage when committed in order to rescue the property owner's pet from harm or death? Can an egoist have too big an ego?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.


Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, September 19, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #231

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Melissa Joulwan presents Perfectly Peelable Hard-Boiled Eggs posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "A foolproof technique for perfectly-cooked, perfectly peelable hard-boiled eggs every time."

Eileen Laird presents AIP Meal Plan Review posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "Let's face it - the paleo autoimmune protocol is hard. The first time you see the list of restricted foods, it's common to ask, 'What on earth can I eat?" We know we need a new menu plan, but figuring it out can feel overwhelming, especially if brain fog is one of our autoimmune symptoms. Christina Feindel has just come to our rescue. She's created a 4 week meal plan that incorporates the recommended healing foods alongside delicious comfort food. She uses simple recipes, time-saving techniques, and she even provides weekly grocery lists. Today, I give a detailed review."

Kevin Geary presents My Definitive Review (and Alternative Solution) of “Fed Up” posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "A thoughtful and honest review of the latest health crisis documentary, Fed Up."

Laura P presents Pickled Pepper Hot Sauce posted at Rising Moon Nutrition, saying, "Making your own hot sauce is extremely easy, and a great way to preserve all those peppers from your garden or CSA box! This version is lacto-fermented to add extra probiotics and lengthen the shelf life, as well as a zip of flavor to balance out the heat."

Kelly Bejelly presents Paleo Pumpkin Cheesecake posted at A Girl Worth Saving, saying, "Rich, creamy and luscious Paleo Pumpkin Cheesecake that is dairy free and nut free."

Nell Stephenson presents Evolution of Medicine Summit posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson invites readers to partake in the Evolution of Medicine Summit which runs this week only."

Sabine presents Moroccan Chicken and Cauliflower Couscous posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "Chicken in the style of a 1001 Nights!"

Eileen Laird presents My New Podcast Dedicated to Autiommune Healing posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "I have exciting news! I'm starting a podcast dedicated 100% to autoimmune healing. I decided to kick off episode 1 with personal stories of people who have successfully reversed their autoimmune disease. Future episodes will alternate between interviews with experts, panel discussions, and Q&A's on a wide range of topics to help us all live this lifestyle and improve our health. Click through to learn more, and listen to the very first episode!"

Meghanne Reburn RM presents Everything Pumpkin! posted at Modern Paleo Midwife, saying, "Big changes over at CaveGirl Plus One! Meg, the Paleo Midwife, is in the process of a metamorphosis and is becoming The Modern Paleo Midwife. This week's post is all about everything pumpkin. Pumpkin is the 'bacon' of the veggie world...it seems to get people pretty excited. Enjoy learning about why pumpkin is a nutritious veggie and safe for even lower carb paleo folks. There is also a recipe for a single serve pregnancy friendly gelatin pumpkin pie and a round up of other recipes from around the bloggersphere. Enjoy."

Kris Gunnars presents 12 Proven Benefits of Avocado (No. 5 is Very Impressive) posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "The avocado is an incredibly healthy food and loaded with important nutrients. Here are 12 health benefits of avocado, that are supported by science."

Nell Stephenson presents Paleoista's Chicken Under a Brick Recipe posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson shares her recipe for Paleoista Chicken Under a Brick."

Jeah Kessha presents The Evolution of Sitting--Reverse Engineering the Chair posted at Paleo All The Way, saying, "The evolutionary problems with sitting can be eliminated with a few simple tweaks to our furniture which put the body in alignment and activate metabolism."

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #157: Low-carb controversy, quitting cardio, and ditching egg whites posted at Diane Sanfilippo, saying, "On this podcast, Diane and Liz give kitchen tips, talk about the homestead, low carbing, quitting cardio and more!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

7 September 2014: Q&A on Net Neutrality and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Should 'net neutrality' be law?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

11 September 2014: Q&A on Rescuing Pets, Large Egos, and More

I answered these questions on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Should a person be prosecuted for property damage when committed in order to rescue the property owner's pet from harm or death? Can an egoist have too big an ego?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, September 12, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #230

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Melissa Joulwan presents Perfectly Peelable Hard-Boiled Eggs posted at The Clothes Make The Girl, saying, "A foolproof technique for perfectly-cooked, perfectly peelable hard-boiled eggs every time."

Eileen Laird presents AIP Meal Plan Review posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "Let's face it - the paleo autoimmune protocol is hard. The first time you see the list of restricted foods, it's common to ask, 'What on earth can I eat?" We know we need a new menu plan, but figuring it out can feel overwhelming, especially if brain fog is one of our autoimmune symptoms. Christina Feindel has just come to our rescue. She's created a 4 week meal plan that incorporates the recommended healing foods alongside delicious comfort food. She uses simple recipes, time-saving techniques, and she even provides weekly grocery lists. Today, I give a detailed review."

Kevin Geary presents My Definitive Review (and Alternative Solution) of “Fed Up” posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "A thoughtful and honest review of the latest health crisis documentary, Fed Up."

Laura P presents Pickled Pepper Hot Sauce posted at Rising Moon Nutrition, saying, "Making your own hot sauce is extremely easy, and a great way to preserve all those peppers from your garden or CSA box! This version is lacto-fermented to add extra probiotics and lengthen the shelf life, as well as a zip of flavor to balance out the heat."

Kelly Bejelly presents Paleo Pumpkin Cheesecake posted at A Girl Worth Saving, saying, "Rich, creamy and luscious Paleo Pumpkin Cheesecake that is dairy free and nut free."

Nell Stephenson presents Evolution of Medicine Summit posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson invites readers to partake in the Evolution of Medicine Summit which runs this week only."

Sabine presents Moroccan Chicken and Cauliflower Couscous posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "Chicken in the style of a 1001 Nights!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, September 06, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 7 September 2014: Q&A on Net Neutrality, Rescuing Pets, Too Big Egos, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 7 September 2014.
  • Question 1: Net Neutrality: Should "net neutrality" be law? Lately, many people on the left have been advocating for "net neutrality." What is it? What would its effects be? What are the arguments for and against it? If it shouldn't be law, might private "net neutrality" be a good thing?
  • Question 2: Rescuing Other People's Pets: Should a person be prosecuted for property damage when committed in order to rescue the property owner's pet from harm or death? Recently, I heard a story about a man who smashed the window of a stranger's car in order to rescue a dog left inside. It was a very hot day, and the dog would have died or suffered brain damage if it had not been rescued. Was it moral for the man to do this? Should he be charged with criminal damages for smashing the window? Should the owner of the dog be charged with leaving the dog to die in the car?
  • Question 3: Too Big Egos: Can an egoist have too big an ego? People often speak disapprovingly of "big egos." The idea seems to be that a person is not supposed to think too well of himself or be too assertive. Is this just the product of altruism, including the idea that a person should be humble? Or can a person really be too big for his britches?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 7 September 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.

Thursday evening, 11 September 2014: Q&A on Veganism, Revenge Porn, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Thursday evening, 11 September 2014.
  • Question 1: The Moral Arguments for Veganism: Are the moral arguments for veganism (and vegetarianism) rational? People often argue for vegetarianism on the grounds that a person can (and perhaps should) regard the lives of animals to be a higher value than the advantages to eating meat such as taste or nutrition. Is this a rational moral outlook, consistent with rational egoism?
  • Question 2: Revenge Porn: Should revenge porn be illegal? Apparently, it is increasingly common after a break-up for a person to share sexual pictures or videos of his/her former lover that were taken while in the relationship. Some people think that sharing sexual images intended to be kept private should be illegal, while others argue that such "revenge porn" is protected speech. Which view is right? Should the consent of all parties be required for the posting of sexual imagery?
The live broadcast begins at 6 pm PT / 7 MT / 8 CT / 9 ET on Thursday, 11 September 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

31 August 2014: Q&A on The Friend Zone, Hard Choices, Frivolous Lawsuits, and More

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Is there any validity to the concept of 'the friend zone'? How can a person make better hard choices? Should judges refuse to hear cases from lawyers behind frivolous suits?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, September 05, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #229

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Kevin Geary presents 8 Examples of Black and White Thinking That Destroy Your Weight Loss and Health Goals posted at Rebooted Body- Ancestral Science and Modern Psychology, saying, "Changing your body is not black and white, one size fits all. It's about taking time to fix all the broken parts of your lifestyle that hinder you from having the body you want. Read on to see some of the common thinking errors you may be making!"

Vanessa Green presents Why changing your food isn't Paleo enough posted at Fitbynature, saying, "We also need a basic (or paleo) movement standard, and you can discover yours. In fact you should; you’re your own best coach and doctor. That’s the best thing about the paleo template, working things out for your own health, food and movement, from the inside out."

Vanessa Green presents The Paleo Way Out (of our Food Pyramid Scheme) posted at Fitbynature, saying, "Anyone who 'knows' what specific diet is best is either misguided, selling something, or likely both.' That said, Paleo provides us with a template to become our own best health coaches."

Louise Hendon presents 3 Things That Should Worry You Far More Than GMOs posted at Paleo Living Magazine, saying, "While everyone is worrying about GMOs, they're missing the bigger picture."

Eileen Laird presents Sweet and Sour Red Cabbage posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "One of the complaints you often hear about paleo is that it can be an expensive. There are no coupons for organic broccoli, and the 'buy 1 get 1 free" sales at the grocery store feature junk food, not wildcaught salmon. Still, there are some foods that are incredibly good for you, while also being easy on the wallet. Cabbage is one of those foods, and this is my favorite way to prepare it. P.S. I never liked cabbage until I tried this recipe."

Sabine presents Lamb Pastilla posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "A Moroccan sweet and hearty lamb dish that will satisfy all senses!"

Kris Gunnars presents 12 Graphs That Show Why People Get Fat posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "People are fatter and sicker than ever before in history. Here are 12 graphs that show the true reasons why people are getting fat."

Erica presents Why Paleo and Gluten-Free are not fad diets posted at Life Is Paleo, saying, "A brief discussion on why a Paleo lifestyle and/ gluten free are not 'fads"."

Diane Sanfilippo presents Podcast Episode #155: Paleo Bread, Fat Shaming, Green Juice and food photo table manners? posted at Diane Sanfilippo, saying, "The newest Podcast with kitchen tips, homesteading adventures and a rant about fat shaming!"

Meghanne Reburn RM presents Pregnancy "detoxing" and the 21-day Sugar Detox posted at CaveGirl Plus One, saying, "This week Meg 'the Paleo Midwife", talks about the safety of 'detoxing' in pregnancy and why the 21-day sugar detox may be a great option if you are looking to optimize your diet, increase your nutrient density and stabilize your blood sugars during pregnancy."

Meghan Little presents Paleo Platano Chips, A Plantain Snack posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This recipe for Paleo Plantano Chips is a favorite in our house! Try them with some Paleo Salsa Verde or Paleo Guacamole!"
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Philosophy Weekend: News from Philosophy in Action

By Diana Hsieh

Every Saturday, I post the news of the week from my primary work, Philosophy in Action, where I apply rational principles to the challenges of real life. Here's this week's update.

Upcoming Radio Shows


Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts live over the internet on most Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Below are the episodes upcoming this week. I hope that you join us! More upcoming episodes can be found here: Episodes on Tap.

Sunday morning, 31 August 2014: Q&A on The Friend Zone, Hard Choices, Reforming Courts, and More

I'll answer these questions on the live broadcast of Philosophy in Action Radio on Sunday morning, 31 August 2014.
  • Question 1: "The Friend Zone": Is there any validity to the concept of "the friend zone"? The "friend zone" is used to describe the situation of a man who is interested in a woman, but she's not interested in being more than friends with him. Then, he's "in the friend zone," and he can't get out except by her say-so. So "nice guys" in the friend zone often use the concept to describe the frustration of watching the women they desire date "bad boys" while they sit over to the side waiting for their chance to graduate from being just friends to being something more. Feminists suggest that this concept devalues a woman's right to determine the context and standard of their sexual and romantic interests, that it treats a woman's sexual acceptance as something that a man is entitled to by virtue of not being a jerk. Is that right? Or do women harm themselves by making bad choices about the types of men they date versus the types they put in the "friend zone?"
  • Question 2: Making Hard Choices: How can a person make better hard choices? How to make hard choices was the subject of a recent TED talk from philosopher Ruth Chang. Her thesis is that hard choices are not about finding the better option between alternatives. Choices are hard when there is no better option. Hard choices require you to define the kind of person you want to be. You have to take a stand for your choice, and then you can find reasons for being the kind of person who makes that choice. Her views really speaks to me. In your view, what makes a choice hard? How should a person make hard choices?
  • Question 3: Judges Exercising Discretion: Should judges refuse to hear cases from lawyers behind frivolous suits? In your 15 May 2014 show, you expressed curiosity about possible improvements to the justice system. I came up with the following idea after sitting on a jury for a civil trial where, after the plaintiff presented his case, the judge dismissed the suit without even having the defendant present his defense. In cases where a judge thinks everyone's time and money were wasted by a pointless case, the judge should refuse to hear any future cases from the lawyer for the losing side. That would cause the lawyer to think twice about representing any frivolous cases, since he would risk being banned from the presiding judge's courtroom henceforth. In addition, judges who know each other could share lawyer blacklists, preventing the lawyer from wasting other judges' time as well. Would this be possible? Would it fix the problem of frivolous lawsuits?
The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 31 August 2014. The podcast will be posted later that day. For more details, check out the episode page.


Recent Podcasts


The podcasts of last week's radio shows are now available. Check out the full collection of past radio shows in the podcast archives, sorted by date or by topic. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast RSS feed too.

24 August 2014: Q&A on Reclaiming Personality, Debating Ethics, Conning Jerks

I answered these questions on Sunday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

Can I reclaim lost personality traits? Why is the Objectivist ethics superior to Christian ethics? Is it wrong to con jerks and blowhards?

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more, including audio files for individual questions.

28 August 2014: Kelly Elmore on "Why Growth Mindsets Matter"

I interviewed educator Kelly Elmore about "Why Growth Mindsets Matter" on Thursday's Philosophy in Action Radio:

"Carol Dweck's book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success offers a new perspective on learning. People with a "fixed mindsets" believe that traits like intelligence or social skills are fixed and cannot be changed much. People with "growth mindsets" believe that humans have the potential to change the traits they possess and constantly learn and improve. As a part of the research for her dissertation, Kelly Elmore has explored the psychological research conducted by Dweck and other cognitive psychologists that led to Dweck's development of the concept of "mindsets." In this interview, Kelly explained what mindsets are, how they impact our lives, and how we can develop growth mindsets in ourselves and encourage them in others." Kelly Elmore is working on her PhD in rhetoric and composition at Georgia State University, teaching freshman composition, helping her 10 year old daughter educate herself, and working with students from 8-18 on writing, Latin, grammar, and rhetoric at a local homeschool co-op. Kelly is in the planning stages of writing her dissertation, which will focus on Carol Dweck's concept of mindset and its relevance to writing. She also cooks (homemade mayo, anyone?) and practices yoga and mindfulness. She doesn't have spare time because she fills it all up with values, happiness, and breathing in and out.

You can listen to or download the podcast below, and visit the episode's page for more.

Recent Blog Posts


Here are last week's posts to Philosophy in Action's blog NoodleFood, ordered from oldest to newest. Don't miss a post: subscribe to NoodleFood's RSS Feed.
If you're interested in more from Philosophy in Action, be sure to like our Facebook Page and subscribe to our Newsletter!

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar

Read more...

Friday, August 29, 2014

The Paleo Rodeo #228

By Diana Hsieh

Welcome to this week's edition of The Paleo Rodeo!

The Paleo Rodeo is a weekly blog carnival featuring the best paleo-related posts by members of the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. The past editions of the Rodeo are collected on this page.

What is "paleo"? As I say in Modern Paleo Principles:

A "paleo" approach to health uses the evolutionary history of homo sapiens, plus the best of modern science, as a broad framework for guiding daily choices about diet, fitness, medicine, and supplementation. The core of paleo is the diet: it eschews grains, sugars, and modern vegetable oils in favor of high-quality meat, fish, eggs, and vegetables.
The purpose of The Paleo Rodeo is to highlight some of the best blogging of the ever-growing paleosphere.

Here is this week's edition:
Ruth presents Apple Cider Vinegar Can Relieve Acid Reflux posted at Paleo Diet Basics, saying, "Yes, it sounds counter intuitive, but if you're into paleo you already know that so many things 'everybody" knows to be true simply aren't. Give this cure a try - it really works!"

Meghan Little and Angel Ayala Torres presents Paleo Vanilla Bean Ice Cream, A Summer Dessert posted at Paleo Effect, saying, "This Paleo Vanilla Bean Ice Cream is our Paleo version of a classic American dessert - you'll never know it's dairy free! Goes great with our Paleo Apple Pie or Paleo Chocolate Cake!"

Meghanne Reburn RM presents The problem with stevia and the start of my 21-day Sugar Detox posted at CaveGirl Plus One, saying, "Fall is in the air here in the Canadian Rockies and the gentle transition has me reflecting on making some positive changes. This week's post is all about why I'm going to join the 21-day Sugar detox Sept 1st and quit my addiction to stevia (and ice cream)! Want to join me on my journey? Check out the post to learn more and stay tuned, next week I talk all about the use of sugar and sugar substitutes during pregnancy."

Sabine presents Whole30: Day 34 Reintroduction part 2 "Don't be an idiot like me" posted at Cave Food Kitchen, saying, "The title describes it already: When finishing your Whole30, make sure you follow the reintroduction guidelines!"

Eileen Laird presents Sweet Coconut Shrimp Curry posted at Phoenix Helix, saying, "Being on a healing diet, I spend a lot of time in the kitchen. It's a requirement when you need to make all of your meals from scratch. Some meals are worth a lot of effort, but my favorite recipes are the ones that are absolutely delicious, yet fast to prepare. This is one of those recipes. From start to finish, you can have this on the table in under 30 minutes."

Kris Gunnars presents 15 “Health Foods” That Are Really Junk Foods in Disguise posted at Authority Nutrition, saying, "Some of the world's unhealthiest foods are often mistakenly believed to be healthy. Here are 15 'health foods" that are really junk foods in disguise."

Steve Kirsch presents Deadlifts, doughnuts and happiness. A.K.A. Food is just food. posted at The Paleo Drummer, saying, "A friend excitedly told me about her deadlift PR and how she 'earned" the right to eat a doughnut. I congratulated her on the deadlift, but told her she had already "earned" the doughnut just because adults get to eat whatever they want; the key is figuring out what you really want."

Nell Stephenson presents Welcome Back to School with a Healthy Lunch posted at Paleoista, by Nell Stephenson, saying, "Paleo expert Nell Stephenson gives suggestions to help keep your kids' lunches healthy at school."

Tarah Chieffi presents Paleo Baby Banana and Avocado Smoothie posted at What I Gather, saying, "A simple Paleo smoothie recipe for your baby...and you, too! :)."

Laura P presents Homemade Two Oil Mayo posted at Rising Moon Nutrition, saying, "Homemade mayo is my favorite condiment and it is a breeze to make! Mine uses extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, which are much more healthful than the storebought mayos made with refined canola oil."
Many thanks to the PaleoBloggers who submitted to this edition of the The Paleo Rodeo! We love new members! So if you blog on paleo-related matters and you'd like to submit your posts to the carnival, please subscribe to the PaleoBloggers e-mail list. You'll receive instructions and reminders via that list.

Read more...

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